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The Notre Dame of Africa

The Cathedral of Notre Dame d’Afrique stands high above the city of Algiers, overlooking the sea. A mixture of Roman and Byzantine styles of architecture, with Moorish influences, it is a magnificent edifice built between 1858 and1872 when Algeria was occupied by the French. Notre-Dame d'Afrique can be seen conspicuously on a shoulder of the Bouzareah hills that stand two miles to the north of the city in the Bab-El-Oued district.

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Features

The Glorious Struggle of Assia Djebar

She is a symbol of the general plight of Algerian women, and has played a stellar role in the emancipation of all Algeria. Oppressed women can find solace in her words, symbolically penned under a surrogate name to placate her literate but conservative family. She has not been recognized by the Nobel Prize Committee, though she has a plethora of awards to her name.

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Gifts from and to Algeria and the World

Music can be a delectable form of history, after from its varied effects on our senses and moods. Folk music is the most telling of music genres, for it has its inspiration in common members of a community, unlike the classical forms which are mostly the preserves of the exceptionally gifted. The folk music of Algeria is a classic example of how art forms breathe tales of the past, because it has as many European and Asian strains in it as from its native continent of Africa.

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Features

Window to Algeria

The media in Algeria is not totally independent. Other mass media such as Television are State controlled, and draconian laws inhibit printed media. Reporting is a hazardous vocation in Algeria, and scores of journalists have been killed, allegedly by extremist groups with religious links. Newspapers in Algeria mark a day each year to protest against the situation.

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Features

The Magic of Tassili N'Ajjer

Pre-historic cave art tells us volumes about our ancestors, and about the glorious and deep past of a nation. Though Algeria is a strife-torn nation today, mired in poor governance and fundamentalism, Tassili N'Ajjer tells us of its cultural greatness, a height to which everyone would hope it will return soon. The paintings date back to more than 6 thousand years before the birth of Christ, and they depict the ecological truth of prosperous living in a desert in most remarkable form.

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Features

Albert Camus and The Plague

Albert Camus is a winner of the 1957 Nobel Prize in Literature who was born in Algeria in the year 1913. At the time of his birth in the small town of Mondovi (known as Dréan today), Algeria had been a French possession for nearly a century and the country had a well-established community of French immigrant stock who considered themselves both French and Algerian. Camus’ father fought and died for France in World War I, having enlisted in one of the Zouave battalions that drew many of their soldiers from emigrant communities in Algeria.

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Features

The Hilton Oasis of Algiers

Rub your eyes, for this is neither Florida, nor the Caribbean! You are just minutes from the center of Algiers, in the country which you thought was all desert and strife! The Hilton in Algiers is like an oasis with luxury, convenience, and security; it is a great place to conduct business, and one should just invite all associates in, and set up a kind of temporary office as such. There must be plenty of Algeria hotels, given its energy resources and tourist potential, but the Hilton really takes the cake!

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Renewal of the Algiers Casbah

A “Casbah”, in its traditional meaning, is the center of a city, usually walled in and fortified to some extent. As such, the Casbahs of cities and towns stretching from Morocco in the west to Damascus in the east are often living museums, a time capsule of the way life used to be centuries ago. Algiers has been Algeria’s leading cities for hundreds of years, and its Casbah is home for tens of thousands of people. The problem, however, is that the Algiers Casbah is rapidly decaying due to an assortment of factors: age, neglect and over-population being the worst culprits.

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