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Features

Chott Melrhir: Algeria's Largest Lake

Extending from the Gulf of Gabès on Tunisia’s east coast, through Algeria to the Sahara Desert, Chott Melrhir is a series of depressions created millions of years ago with the formation of the Atlas Mountain Range. Covering an area of around 6,700 square kilometers, Chott Melrhir is considered to be Algeria's largest lake, despite the fact that for a large part of the year it contains little or no water. Located around sixty kilometers from Biskra, and around eighty-five kilometers from El Oued and Touggourt, the saltpan-lake lies below sea level and is the lowest point of Algeria.

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Features

The Historic Royal Mausoleum of Mauretania

The Royal Mausoleum of Mauretania is sometimes referred to as the Mausoleum of Juba and Cleopatra Selene, and can be found on the road that lies between the cities of Algiers and Cherchell. The mausoleum is an ancient historical site that is of significant importance to Algeria and its history, as it is the final resting place of Juba II and Cleopatra Selene II, who were of the last king and queen of Mauretania. The mausoleum was constructed in 3 BCE.

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Features

Insight into the Kabyle People of Algeria

The Kabyle people form Algeria's largest homogeneous cultural-linguistic-ethnic community, and are considered the most traditional Berbers in North Africa. They have become a dominant group in Algeria, with an estimated forty percent of the Algerian community consisting of Kabyle people, and originate from their homeland, which is located in the northern region of Algeria, in Kabylie.

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Features

Gemellae – Remnant of the Roman Empire

Located on the edge of the Sahara Desert, around five kilometers southwest of the village of M'Lili in the Biskra Province of Algeria, the archeological site of Gemellae is a reminder of the once mighty Roman Empire that wielded power over large parts of the world, including much of North Africa. Historians have established that Gemellae formed part of the southernmost boundary of the Roman Empire, although archeologists have noted that there was already a fortified settlement at the site of Gemellae when the Romans reached that point in their invasion of Africa from the north. In the records of Pliny the Elder, a Roman author and philosopher who lived from 23 to 79 CE, he recounted that at the time Roman consul Lucius Cornelius Balbus was victorious over the Saharan Berber tribe known as the Garamantes in 19 BCE, a fortified settlement referred to as Milgis Gemmella was part of his conquest. It is generally agreed that Milgis Gemmella and the archeological site of Gemellae are one and the same.

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Features

Tlemcen – Capital of Islamic Culture

Referred to as the Pearl of the Arab Maghreb and chosen as the Capital of Islamic Culture for 2011, the town of Tlemcen in Algeria is hosting the International Festival of Folk Dances on from the 12th to the 18th of July, 2011 as part of a series of events highlighting various aspects of Islam. In a message from the President of Algiers, Abdelaziz Bouteflika, he noted that Tlemcen’s rich cultural and historic inheritance made it the perfect choice as a venue for the festival, a choice which was made by the Islamic Organization for Education, Culture and Sciences.

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Features

A Look at Archeology in Algeria

Considered as a branch of anthropology, archeology is broadly defined as a study of humanity and human societies. Archeologists put in a lot of time and effort uncovering relics of the past that either prove and extend what is already known about the development of societies in various countries, or in revealing aspects of human history that have previously not been known. Algeria is a treasure trove of evidence indicating human occupation of this North African region going back to Paleolithic and Neolithic eras.

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Features

The Rustamid Dynasty of Algeria

The Rustamid dynasty of Ibadi Kharijite imam was a Muslim theocracy of Persian origin that ruled in central Maghreb (Morocco, Western Sahara, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and Mauritania) from 776 to 909 AD. The Rustamid's capital was the city of Tahert (also known as Tiaret or Tihert) in present-day Algeria, with its authority believed to have extended east as far as the Nafusa Mountains in modern day Libya. The Ibadi form of Islam is different from the well-known Shia and Sunni forms. While there is dissension as to the origins of the Ibadi movement, some scholars are of the opinion that it is one of the earliest forms of Islam, while others believe that the Ibadis are an off-shoot of the Kharijites, referring to Muslims who rejected the leadership of the Islamic prophet Muhammad's son-in-law and cousin, Rashidun Caliph Alid ibn Abi Talib. Today, there are still Ibadi adherents in Tunisia, Libya, East Africa and Algeria.

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Features

Madjid Bougherra – Algerian Football Star

As one of the top and most sought after football players, Madjid Bougherra has proven to be a rising star in the world of international football. He is known for his diversity as he is able to be a midfielder as well as a defender, and while playing for the national team of Algeria, he also plays for the Rangers. His parents, both Algerian, made the decision to move France, as many other Algerians were doing at the time, with Bougherra's mother giving birth to him in Longvic on 7 October 1982.

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