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  1. #1
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    Algerian cereals market

    Crop through out the country is developing well despite less rain, should good conditions continue, 2006 crop would be good. U.S. market share for durum declined significantly over the past years due to competition from cheap French and Canadian wheat.

    Algeria still remains one of the largest importer of wheat (5.6 million metric tons imported in CY 2005) and the largest importer of durum wheat (3 million MT in CY 2005). For only the first two months of CY 2006, Algeria imported 898,000 MT of wheat of which 408,000 MT of durum and 490,000 MT of soft wheat. Despite high world prices, high demand and a decline of production in 2005 encouraged imports of wheat and barley in MY 2004 and 2005.

    US market share for durum declined significantly over the past years due to competition from French and Canadian wheat. Excellent durum yields and good quality crops, as well as proximity and good prices because of subsidies have enabled France to become the largest supplier of wheat to Algeria. In CY 2005, Algeria imported 1.5 million MT of durum from France (50 percent of total durum imports). For this same year, U.S. ranked fourth supplier of durum with 172,000 MT behind France (1.5 million MT), Canada (360,000 MT) and Mexico (295,000 MT).

    France still remains the main supplier of soft wheat with 977,000 MT for CY 2005 followed by Russia (670,000 Mt), and Ukraine (336,000 MT).

    For the first two months of CY 2006, Algeria imported from France 157,000 MT of durum and 294,000 MT of soft wheat. For the same period, United States ranked third supplier for durum (62,000 MT) behind France and Canada. Soft wheat is mostly imported from France, Ukraine, Czech and Russia.

    Algeria wheat update: U.S. Durum market share down

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    Algeria wheat imports down at 2.3m tonnes

    Algiers, July 25th (Reuters) - - Algeria, one of the world's largest grain importers, saw its wheat purchases fall slightly to 2.3 million tonnes in the first six months of 2006 from 2.5 million tonnes in the same period last year, according to official data published in a government-owned newspaper.

    Durum wheat imports were at 948,719 tonnes while soft wheat purchases reached 1.358 million tonnes, according to customs figures published in El Moujahid daily.

    The figures showed that the total value of imports stood at $468.59 million against $474.5 million in the January-June period of 2005.

    Algeria spends about $1 billion per year to fill shortfalls in national production.

    It imported 5.02 million tonnes in 2005 versus 5.18 million in 2004, the Agriculture Ministry has said.

    The North African country's cereal harvest reached 3.5 million tonnes in 2004/2005 from 4.0 million in the previous season.

    Government officials said recently they expected the wheat crop to exceed 4.0 million tonnes this year thanks to favourable weather.

    Algeria wheat imports down at 2.3m tonnes

  3. #3
    phylay is offline Guest
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    Erriad-Setif withdraws from the Algiers Stock Exchange where it lost more than 200B DZCentimes.
    Will The Algiers Stock Exchange centre have the activity level DZ desrves?


    http://elkhabar.com/FrEn/lire.php?ida=38507&idc=52

    http://elkhabar.com/FrEn/lire.php?ida=38508&idc=52

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    70% of Algeria's cereal imports from France

    Up to October 2006, Algeria imports of soft wheat reached 900 thousand tonnes while durum wheat imports are estimated at 1.8 million tonnes, 70% from France. To recall, Algeria is among the main importers of durum wheat in the world and among the ten first importers of soft wheat.

    Mr. John Sharza, a member of the French cereals foreign trade union, made clear that Algeria is French importers' best destination and that France is seeking to double the cereals quantity marketed in Algeria, although more than two thirds of Algeria imports are already coming from France.

    During French and Algerians meetings held yesterday at the Hilton Hotel in Algiers, Mr. Sharza provided an exhaustive presentation on Algeria and the operators in this field in order to “raise the French exports” as these bargains will be rewarding to Algeria especially when it comes to the short distance and cheap transport fees.

    Hence, Algeria will remain France first customer since it imported up to the end of October 670 thousand tonnes of soft wheat compared with 190 thousand tonnes Algeria imported from abroad during the same period of time.
    Moreover, a further 1.65 million tonnes quantity is expected to be imported during the 2006 to 2007 season.

    In another context, the same speaker mentioned that the World Council of Cereals called recently to reduce the international consumption owing to wheat production shortages. This call aims at maintaining the balance in the international market and preserving the world’s food security.

    70% of Algeria's cereal imports from France: French exporters seek raising their share

  5. #5
    FORTUNATO is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al-khiyal
    Up to October 2006, Algeria imports of soft wheat reached 900 thousand tonnes while durum wheat imports are estimated at 1.8 million tonnes, 70% from France. To recall, Algeria is among the main importers of durum wheat in the world and among the ten first importers of soft wheat.

    70% of Algeria's cereal imports from France: French exporters seek raising their share
    (1 800 000 000 KG + 900 000 000 KG )X1,3 (TO GET 100%)= 3 510 000 000 KG/32 000 000 PEOPLES= 109 KG PER PERSON PER YEAR OR 0,3 KG/PERSON/DAY


    HOW MUCH OIL DO WE NEED TO SALES TO COVER THIS STOMAC FEEDING PBM?
    A government that robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the support of Paul.
    By: George Bernard Shaw

  6. #6
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    Algerian durum export market representatives visit North Dakota and Minnesota

    May 15, 2007 -- Top importers and millers representing the majority of Algeria’s private durum purchasing community will visit North Dakota on May 17-19, as guests of the North Dakota Wheat Commission (NDWC) and U.S. Wheat Associates.

    The team is interested in learning more about northern grown durum and the interaction of producers, country elevators, and exporters in delivering product to them.

    Algerian buyers continue to advance their quality demands and are more actively seeking information on the end-use and milling characteristics of the various grades and varieties available from U.S. durum.

    "Teams like this are always a great opportunity to showcase the quality durum produced by our state’s farmers," says Jim Peterson, NDWC marketing director.

    "Algeria has routinely been our top import customer for durum over the years, competing with Italy for that position. Their recent high for purchases was 10.8 million bushels in 2005, most of which is used for making couscous, but they also make a variety of other traditional pasta products."

    Algeria is a consistent buyer of U.S. durum, averaging a little over 9 million bushels per year over the last five years.

    Considering that the world durum market is not as broad or deep as non-durum markets, it is important to maximize market share with big buyers like Algeria.

    It is the largest buyer of durum in the world and often accounts for about one-third of world trade opportunities.

    This makes them a highly sought after market by Canada, the European Union, and other minor exporters, which keeps price competition keen.

    Imports depend on the size of Algeria''s domestic crop, and the bulk of the imports are controlled through the Office of Cereals (OIAC), which controls about one-half of the imports.

    Private buyers account for the balance, and the United States has had more recent success with the private buyers, since the OIAC has tended to operate through an exclusive, very price-competitive agreement with the Canadian Wheat Board.

    The NDWC will work to show Algerian buyers the advantages provided by U.S. hard amber durum, give the team an overview of the U.S. wheat marketing system, and show it how to optimize quality and price to obtain the best value for their purchase.

    While here, the trade team will discuss durum breeding and quality testing with North Dakota State University scientists in Fargo on May 17 and then travel to Minot and visit the Minot Grain Inspection, Max Farmers’ Elevator, and the Richard Haugeberg farm near Max on May 18.

    They will learn firsthand what the prospects for the 2007 durum crop are and what the potential availabilities will be like in the upcoming market year.

    The team also will visit the Port of Duluth and Minneapolis Grain Exchange.


  7. #7
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    May 18, 2007 -- The Magic City had some visitors from across the globe, today. Representatives from Algeria's private durum purchasing community are here as guests of the North Dakota wheat Commission and U.S. Wheat Associates.

    Algeria has been the state's top import customer for durum in recent years. The country's purchases average over 9 million bushels of durum every year. In fact, the four representatives here today account for 80 percent of U.S. durum exports.

    The Algerian durum team was at Minot Grain Inspection today learning how durum is tested and graded in the United States.

    George Galasso, Regional VP, U.S. Wheat Associates, said "We have some very loyal customers in Algeria. We want to ensure that they continue to be good buyers and expand their purchases, and we see the best way of doing that is to show them our industry to give them more confidence and to demonstrate to them why they should continue purchasing from us."

    The group also made stops at the Max Farmer's Elevator and the Richard Haugeberg farm near Max today.

    And if you're wondering what Algeria uses all that durum for, the country mainly uses it to make couscous a type of pasta.


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