+ Reply to Thread
Page 51 of 55 FirstFirst ... 41 49 50 51 52 53 ... LastLast
Results 351 to 357 of 384
  1. #351
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Merouane Mokdad :


    Jeudi 21 Octobre 2010 -- Après des mois de silence, le premier ministre a choisi l’APN pour défendre les mesures sur l’investissement introduites dans la loi de finances complémentaire de 2009 et confirmées dans les lois de finances de 2010. «C’est l’occasion de réagir sans polémique au discours critique mais aussi alarmiste faisant croire que le gouvernement risque de priver l’Algérie de l’apport des investissements étrangers», a-t-il déclaré. Ahmed Ouyahia a indiqué que le gouvernement a d’abord la charge de promouvoir les intérêts de l’économie nationale et de faire prévaloir les intérêts macro-économiques en les traduisant en croissance et en emplois. «Tout cela en préservant l’indépendance financière du pays», a-t-il soutenu. S’appuyant sur les données de la Banque d’Algérie, «institution responsable du suivi des mouvements transfrontaliers des capitaux», il a estimé que les investissements étrangers hors hydrocarbures n’étaient pas présents «substantiellement» avant les mesures prises par le gouvernement. En 2000, la valeur de ces investissements était de 21 millions de dollars. Elle est passée à 589,7 millions de dollars en 2005 avant de s’établir à 1,48 milliard de dollars en 2008. «L’année 2009, ayant vu la mise en œuvre des nouvelles dispositions applicables aux investissements étrangers, n’a pas vu un recul des apports étrangers hors hydrocarbures qui ont atteint 1,66 milliard de dollars», a ajouté le Premier ministre. Il a annoncé que le Conseil national de l’investissement (CNI) a, jusqu’à fin septembre 2010, accordé des avantages à des projets d’investissements directs étrangers, «qui étaient en instance», d’un montant total de 5,5 milliards de dollars et à des projets d’investissements en partenariat, «selon les nouvelles mesures», pour un montant global de 5,6 milliards de dollars. À propos de la règle des 51/49, le Premier ministre a déclaré que l’obligation pour l’investisseur étranger de s’associer avec des capitaux algériens, «tout en gardant la gestion de la réalisation», n’est pas une spécificité algérienne. «C’est une règle en vigueur dans de nombreux pays y compris émergents», a-t-il noté.

  2. #352
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    ALGIERS, October 21, 2010 (Reuters) -- Algeria will not give way to lobbies urging it to change its policies towards foreign firms, Prime Minister Ahmed Ouyahia said on Thursday, in an apparent reference to a row with Egyptian telecom firm Orascom Telecom. Algeria has hit Orascom's local unit with bills for millions of dollars in back taxes, barred it from moving cash overseas, and now wants to nationalise it, putting in doubt a $6.6 billion deal by Russia's Vimpelcom to acquire much of Orascom's assets.

    "Our goal is to guarantee the fundamentals of our economy ... we won't follow lobbies and isolated interests," Ouyahia said in rare public remarks in parliament. "Some foreign investors have been guided by speculative profits, and have neglected to play by the rules," Ouyahia said. "Good growth is not in the services economy if it does not bring any added value ... Algeria doesn't need foreign money, but it rather needs knowhow, technology and modern management."

    Algeria has approved a series of laws in the past two years including limiting the stake a foreign investor can acquire in an Algerian firm to 49 percent. A foreign investor must obtain permission from the government before it can sell on a share in an Algerian company. The change in economic policy coincided with soaring oil prices that enabled Africa's second biggest country to launch several development programmes and to boost its foreign exchange reserves to $150 billion in 2010. Algeria is still intent on buying Orascom's local unit Djezzy, Finance Minister Karim Djoudi said on Thursday.

  3. #353
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    حددت حكومة أحمد أويحيى ثلاثة أهداف كبرى خلال الخماسي القادم، تتمثل في رفع نسبة نمو القطاع الفلاحي إلى 8 بالمائة ورفع حصة الصناعة من 5 إلى 10 بالمائة من القيمة المضافة الشاملة وتقليص نسبة البطالة إلى أقل من 10 بالمائة، وتوجه أويحيى إلى خصومه في السياسة الاقتصادية، وقال إن دور الحكومة هو السهر على الحفاظ على ركائز الاقتصاد الوطني.. المساعدة على تنمية المؤسسات ولكن لا يمكنها أن تنساق وراء منطق المصالح المعزولة أو اللوبيات مهما كانت''.

    اقتصاديا قال الوزير الأول، أحمد أويحيى، إن الجزائر ''ليست حاليا بحاجة ماسة بالضرورة إلى رؤوس أموال أجنبية بقدر ما هي في حاجة ماسة إلى المهارة والتكنولوجيا والتسيير العصري وشركاء قادرين على فتح أسواق أخرى لمنتجات في إطار الشراكة''. ودعا الشركاء الأجانب وعلى رأسهم البلدان الشقيقة والمؤسسات التي تنشط في السوق الوطنية إلى المساهمة في تنمية الجزائر وعصرنة اقتصادها، وذكر في هذا الشأن ''أن بعض المستثمرين الأجانب الذين حققوا نجاحات في السوق المحلية سعوا في البداية وراء الربح عن طريق المضاربة حتى وإن تطلب ذلك تجاهل سلطات البلاد وسيادتها أو مخالفة قوانينها دون عقاب.. الدولة لا يمكنها أن تنساق وراء منطق المصالح المعزولة واللوبيات مهما كانت''.

    وتابع أويحيى بخصوص الاستثمار الأجنبي ''الذي ما انفكت الجزائر تدعو إليه بإلحاح وتطالب به دوما مقابل انفتاح أوسع لسوقها لم يستجب بعد لهذه النداءات''. ورد على قول من وصفهم بـ''البعض الذي يدعي بأننا سنمنع الاستثمارات الأجنبية من المجيء''. فقال إن ''بلادنا خارج المحروقات قد تلقت أقل من 500 مليون دولار كاستثمارات أجنبية في سنة 2005 وأقل من 1 مليار دولار في سنة .2007 وكانت المؤسسات الأجنبية تعتقد بأن إبقاء الجزائر مجرد سوق ذات جاذبية كبيرة أمرا مشروعا بما أن هذه الأخيرة بدا لها أنها في متناولها دون بذل أي مجهود. بل أكثـر من ذلك فإن بعض المستثمرين الأجانب الذي حققوا نجاحات في السوق المحلية سعوا في البداية وراء الربع عن طريق المضاربة حتى وإن تطلب ذلك تجاهل سلطات البلاد وسيادتها أو محاولة مخالفة قوانينها دون عقاب.

    وذكر الوزير الأول ''أنه لمن الوهم تصور ازدهار مؤسسة اقتصادية محلية دون صلابة الاقتصاد الوطني كله''.

  4. #354
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    ALGIERS, November 4, 2010 (Reuters) -- Tough new conditions imposed on foreign firms in Algeria are depressing foreign direct investment (FDI) which the energy exporter badly needs to create jobs, the International Monetary Fund said on Thursday. Algeria experienced a 60 percent drop in FDI in 2009 as the global downturn cut investment worldwide, but while similar economies saw a strong recovery in capital flows in the first half of this year, in Algeria they rose by only 5 percent.

    Joel Toujas-Bernate, head of an annual IMF mission to Algeria, said there was a link between weak investment and a set of restrictions imposed by the Algerian government over the past two years as part of a policy of economic nationalism. "There has been without any doubt an impact from these measures on the behaviour of investors because ... they have taken the position of waiting to see on what terms they can come and invest in Algeria," said Toujas-Bernate. "In 2010, while ... in lots of emerging countries we have observed a fairly significant recovery in capital flows, we have not observed a similar recovery in the Algerian economy with the level of foreign direct investment, which remains very low," he told a news conference.

    The IMF's figures exclude foreign direct investment in the financial and energy sectors. Changes in the rules for foreign investment include a law limiting the stake that a foreign investor can hold in a local firm to 49 percent, and a requirement that foreign bidders for state contracts find local partners. Some investors say a dispute over the local mobile phone unit of Egypt's Orascom Telecom has also sent negative signals about the business climate. The unit has been hit with back taxes and is now set to be nationalised. However, Toujas-Bernate said there were special circumstances involved in the Orascom Telecom dispute and that it did not have an impact on the broader business climate. The IMF mission said Algeria should also allow a greater role for the private sector, reform banking and diversify the economy outside the dominant oil and gas sector to tackle the country's high unemployment.

    Speaking earlier at a conference in Algiers attended by IMF Managing Director Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Algeria's Prime Minister Ahmed Ouyahia set out a different vision. "The state is obliged to provide the bulk of the effort, pending the development of a real domestic private sector and while we wait for our foreign partners to finally agree to offset their profits on the Algerian market through productive investment here," Ouyahia told the conference. Toujas-Bernate said he expected inflation in Algeria to reach 4-4.5 percent this year, above a government forecast of 3.5 percent. Inflation was 5.7 percent in 2009.

  5. #355
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Hakim Arous :


    Jeudi 9 Décembre 2010 -- L'Algérie a attiré 2,31 milliards de dollars d'investissements directs étrangers (IDE) en 2009. C'est ce que révèle le rapport annuel de l'Agence multilatérale de garantie des investissements (MIGA), une institution de la Banque mondiale, publié jeudi 9 décembre. Pour la première fois depuis 2003, le montant des IDE a été inférieur à celui de l'année précédente. En effet, le rapport indique que les IDE étaient en constante augmentation depuis 2003. Ils sont passés de 630 millions de dollars cette année-là, à 880 millions en 2004, 1,08 milliard en 2006, 1,66 milliard en 2007 et 2,65 milliards en 2008. Ce chiffre est une mauvaise nouvelle pour la politique du gouvernement. Car au-delà des conséquences de la crise économique, il vient s'ajouter aux autres variables économiques qui montrent que les réformes menées en Algérie ces deux dernières années ont découragé les investisseurs étrangers.

  6. #356
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Samir Allam :


    Mardi 21 Décembre 2010 -- Le Wall Street Journal, grand quotidien américain des milieux d’affaires, a publié, mardi 21 décembre, une analyse sur les investissements étrangers en Algérie, particulièrement le sort réservé aux groupes russes dans notre pays. En Russie, raconte le journal, il est courant de voir les affaires se conduire à la technique du venik, une branche de bouleau souvent utilisée par un personnage fort musclé qui masse les clients au sauna et les aide à se détendre, parfois en frappant leur dos. Les groupes pétroliers Shell et BP ont eu droit à ce traitement respectivement avec leurs partenaires russes Gazprom et TNK-BP. Mais malgré les coups durs qui leur ont été portés, ils ne veulent pas renoncer à la Russie et à ses importantes réserves de gaz. Il faut croire qu’en Algérie, une technique similaire est utilisée, explique le Wall Street Journal. Mais à la place du venik, les investisseurs étrangers ont droit à la chorba, «une soupe aux saveurs locales et au goût épicé qui traduit le sens de l’hospitalité», souligne le quotidien économique et financier.

    Depuis quelques mois, les Algériens font goûter leur chorba aux Russes. Récemment, les oligarques russes ont tenté de racheter des participations dans les télécommunications (Djezzy) et les hydrocarbures (BP Algérie). Mais en dépit du soutien confirmé du Kremlin, les groupes russes VimpelCom et TNK-BP ont échoué face à une vive résistance du côté algérien, constate le journal. Même la visite en octobre dernier du président russe Dimitri Medvedev, venu plaider en compagnie d’une forte délégation d’entrepreneurs en faveur du rachat de Djezzy par VimpelCom n’y a rien changé. Selon des sources qui ont assisté à l’entretien, le président Bouteflika n’a pas souhaité d’interférences à ce propos et a rappelé que l’affaire «reste entre nous et Djezzy». Selon le Wall Street Journal, l’Algérie a ouvert son marché aux investisseurs étrangers après la décennie noire de 1990. Mais elle semble aujourd’hui regretter que la chorba qui leur a été servie fût un peu trop douce. Elle a donc décidé de changer ses lois. Résultat, la Russie, conclut le journal américain aura compris en tout cas que d’autres pays défendent leurs intérêts nationaux tout aussi bien qu’elle.

  7. #357
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Hamid Guemache :


    Mardi 28 Décembre 2010 -- Nouveau tour de vis dans la politique algérienne de change. La Banque d’Algérie a décidé, il y a quelques jours, d’interdire la réexportation des fonds avancés par les groupes étrangers à leurs filiales locales. But de cette décision qui suscite de fortes inquiétudes parmi plusieurs sociétés étrangères implantées sur le marché algérien : lutter contre l’endettement extérieur de l’Algérie. La dette extérieure de l’Algérie était de 3,7 milliards de dollars à la fin du mois de juin 2010, selon le gouverneur de la Banque d’Algérie, Mohamed Laksaci. Le gouvernement, via cette mesure, compte également mettre fin à certaines pratiques des groupes étrangers qui consistent à créer des filiales en Algérie avec un capital social minimum pour ensuite les financer à coup de dizaines de millions de dollars sous forme de prêts. Or, «cette pratique fait que la dette extérieure de l’Algérie augmente alors que les groupes étrangers ne prennent aucun risque dans le pays. Ce n’est pas normal de créer une filiale avec un petit capital social et ensuite de lui envoyer des millions de dollars pour la financer. Cet argent est ensuite déclaré par ces filiales comme un endettement extérieur à rembourser», explique un banquier. La décision de la Banque d’Algérie vise notamment les sociétés étrangères spécialisées dans l’importation. Elle concerne les sociétés déjà établies et les futures entreprises. «La rétroactivité de la décision pose problème aux sociétés qui ont déjà fait des déclarations d’endettement à la Banque d’Algérie», ajoute le banquier. À défaut de les réexporter, la Banque d’Algérie a suggéré aux filiales des groupes étrangers d’intégrer les fonds avancés par leurs maisons-mères dans le capital social. La décision de la Banque d’Algérie signifie que les filiales algériennes des groupes étrangers ne demanderaient plus à leurs maisons-mères des financements. Ces filiales vont devoir trouver des financements en Algérie, auprès des banques locales. «Mais le marché est dominé par le secteur public qui obéit à des injonctions politiques», regrette un chef d’entreprise.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts