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  1. #15
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    Radia Djouzi :


    Lundi 14 Avril 2008 -- Après avoir signé au début de mars dernier les statuts de la société mixte dénommée «El Djazaïria El Omania lil asmida» Spa, les trois partenaires, à savoir la Compagnie nationale des hydrocarbures Sonatrach, le groupe omanais Suhail Bahwan et le groupe japonais Mitsubishi industries (MHI), signeront aujourd’hui à Alger, le contrat EPC (Engineering, procurment & construction) pour la réalisation du complexe de production d’ammoniac et d’urée, a rapporté hier l’APS, citant la Sonatrach. En effet, cette société, qui sera chargée de la réalisation et de l’exploitation de cette usine, est détenue à 49% par Sonatrach et à 51% par les deux groupes omanais et japonais.

    Le délai de réalisation de cette usine est de 43 mois, elle sera implantée dans la zone industrielle d’Arzew (Oran) sur une superficie de 90 ha. D’après la même source, les capacités de production de l’usine portent sur 7 000 tonnes d’urée et 4 000 tonnes d’ammoniac par jour, destinés à l’exportation sur la base de contrats à long terme. Le coût global de l’investissement est de l’ordre de 2,4 milliards de dollars, dont une bonne partie, soit 65 à 70% du montant du projet, sera financée par les banques algériennes dont le chef de file est le CPA, tandis que le reste s’articulant entre 30 et 35% devra provenir des fonds propres des trois groupes.

    Dans les clauses du contrat d’association, il est également question d’exporter des produits finis via une nouvelle jetée à financer et à réaliser par le groupe national Sonatrach seul et dont l’utilisation sera facturée à la société mixte de production. La Sonatrach devrait également développer trois autres projets de la même envergure dans le domaine de la pétrochimie. Il s’agit des projets d’ammoniac et d’urée avec le groupe Orascom (Egypte), de cracking d’éthane et de production d’oléfines avec Total (France) et du complexe de méthanol avec le consortium international Almet. En ce qui concerne la création de l’emploi, la Spa «El Djazaïria El Omania lil asmida» prévoit la création de 4 000 postes de travail au démarrage du chantier et de 1 500 une fois l’usine mise en service.

  2. #16
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    Business Today Egypt, April 2008:


    Over the past 18 months, Algeria has launched a series of projects to develop new petrochemical plants and to upgrade existing facilities. One of the major planks in its campaign to expand downstream capacity is a series of new projects at the port of Arzew in the country’s west. Oil Minister Chakib Khelil intends to spend $28 billion (LE 154 billion) on petrochemical projects over the next five years, and Egypt’s Orascom Construction Industries (OCI) has taken its place as a leader in the sector.

    One such project is a joint venture between Algeria’s state-owned hydrocarbons company, Sonatrach, and OCI. The two have formed a company called Sorfert, which will build a new ammonia/urea fertilizer plant at Arzew, due to be completed in 2010.

    The plant is expected to produce one million tons of ammonia/urea fertilizer, along with an additional 700,000 tons of ammonia. Local press reported that as many as 7,000 jobs will be created during the construction phase of the project, more than twice the original estimate.

    Ammonia and urea are produced by taking nitrogen from the atmosphere and lining it with hydrogen from hydrocarbons. As using natural gas for this process is the most cost effective and environmentally friendly option, Algeria, with deep reserves, has the wherewithal to become a market leader.

    The 33-hectare site of the facility is located close to the port of Arzew, which has been extensively developed for chemical exports from existing facilities in the region and has assured supplies of gas.

    According to the Algerian Investment Promotion Agency, Orascom’s diverse holdings in Algeria, which are spread across the telecommunications, cement and water desalination industries, in addition to its involvement in the Arzew project, total an estimated $10 billion (LE 55 billion). Such was OCIs enthusiasm for the project that initial work began before financing was locked in. At the end of June last year, Sorfert signed an agreement with German firm Uhde — part of the ThyssenKrupp group — to design and provide technology for the plant.

    On January 11, the project took another step forward when British firm Wellman was awarded a contract by Uhde to supply five sets of vacuum condenser packages to Sorfert, part of the essential equipment for the new plant.

    A further ammonia plant, also to be located at Arzew, was announced earlier the same month. Suhail Bahwan Group Holding (SBGH) of Oman signed a $2.4 billion (LE 13.2 billion) agreement with Sonatrach, with the plant expected to produce 4,000 tons of ammonia and 7,000 tons of urea per day. Similar to the OCI project, Sonatrach will take a 49% stake in the joint venture, which will be financed by banks including Credit Populaire d’Algerie.

    High gas costs in Europe and the United States are putting pressure on producers in both regions. However, with vast supplies close at hand, Algeria’s domestic gas costs are around 12% of those in Europe or the US.

    According to Osama Bishai, OCI’s director of projects, rising gas prices are resulting in the shifting of gas-based industries from the developed world to developing countries. “Lots of plants in Europe are being shut down and their markets are being served by new plants in Algeria, Egypt and the Gulf,” Bishai said in a media interview last December.

    Algeria already has a chemical fertilizer industry. An ammonia production facility sited at Arzew has an annual output of 365,000 tons and an associated urea plant that is able to turn out 146,000 tons per year. However, the original facilities were built in the early 1970s and, while upgraded in the late 1980s, do not have the same capacity or modern technology as the new plant.

    Demand for chemical fertilisers is growing and Sonatrach must be confident its joint ventures will prove lucrative. In addition to the advantage of low production expenses, it will benefit from Algeria’s proximity to European markets, meaning that Sorfert can keep shipping costs down.

    Bishai said that OCI was looking at an annual return on its investment of between 16% and 18%. “There are good margins now and we are very optimistic about the future,” he said. “Once we are in production, we expect to enjoy relatively good margins, and if shipping costs continue to be high we will have a major advantage.”

    With global fertilizer prices at near record highs, prompted by increased demand due to drought conditions experienced in many parts of the world and soaring gas prices, Algeria’s policy of investing in downstream industries could result in a rich harvest.

    OCI is not the only foreign firm interested in tapping into the potentially lucrative Algerian petrochemicals sector. On a recent visit to Moscow, Algerian Prime Minister Abdelaziz Bouteflika discussed the potential for cooperation with Russia in energy and industry. Moscow’s industry and energy minister Viktor Khristenko indicated that the Russian company Itera was close to signing an agreement to develop a petrochemicals plant in the North African country, in partnership with firms from Canada and Finland.

    Algeria will, however, face tough competition in building up the petrochemicals industry. Several countries in the MENA region are looking to develop their own downstream sectors. Libya, for example, has seen a great deal of interest from international investors and a trade promotion office recently established by the Taiwanese government has explicitly stated that petrochemicals are to be one of its main focuses; Russia’s Gazprom is also already heavily involved in upstream exploration and production, which could open the door for firms such as Itera.

    Further east still, Gulf countries are enjoying huge incomes from their oil exports, and some are looking to build up their downstream capabilities. While Algeria has benefitted from the sharp increases in energy prices, it does not have the resources that countries such as Qatar and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) possess to invest in their petrochemical industries and the infrastructure to support them.

    Algeria can focus on its competitive advantages, though — its location on the Mediterranean providing easy access to European markets and relatively low labour costs being two of the most important that it has over Gulf states. Continued reform of labour and business legislation to make it easier to set up shop and invest in the country will be invaluable in ensuring Algeria remains a competitive place to both invest in and export from.

    As with most of Algeria’s industries, it is also worth citing the potential currently untapped that Algeria could use to develop export markets. The disappointingly low level of trade with the country’s Maghreb neighbours is repeatedly highlighted by the International Monetary Fund and other analysts — including the Maghreb’s European trading partners — as a factor holding the countries of North Africa back from fulfilling their potential.

    While Morocco and Tunisia are not huge markets and Libya and Mauritania have budding petrochemicals sectors of their own, it would make sense for Algeria to look to export some of its new output to its neighbours. Lower tariff barriers, better transport and co-ordination between industries to promote specialization rather than overlap, would boost intra-Maghreb trade and provide better access to the growing regional markets for Algeria. Morocco, for example, currently imports significant amounts of petrochemical products from Iran — not exactly next door.

    There is currently plenty of potential in Algerian petrochemicals, hence the attraction for OCI, due in no small part to the government’s drive to develop the sector. With momentum behind reform, investment and trade promotion, the promise of the sector could be realised.

  3. #17
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    Lundi 14 Avril 2008 -- La société société nationale des hydrocarbures Sonatrach a signé lundi à Alger deux contrats d'un montant global de 4,5 milliards de dolllars pour la réalisation de deux complexes de production d'ammoniac et d'urée dans la zone industrielle d'Arzew, près d’Oran.

    Sonatrach a signé un premier contrat pour la construction d'un complexe de production d'ammoniac et d'urée avec la société Al Aldjazairia Al Omania Lil Asmida, détenue à 49% par le groupe Sonatrach, et 51% par le groupe Omanais Suhail Bahuan avec le consortium japonais Mitsubishi heavy industries (Mhi). Le coût global de ce projet est estimé à 2,4 milliards de dollars. La capacité de production de cette usine est de 7 000 tonnes par jour d'urée et 4 000 tonnes par jour d'ammoniac, selon la Sonatrach.

    Le second contrat, signé entre la Sonatrach et le groupe égyptien Orascom, porte sur la construction d'une autre usine de production d'ammoniac et d'urée à Arzew d'une capacité de 4 400 tonnes/jour d'ammoniac et 3 450 tonnes/jour d'urée, destinés à l'exportation, selon la même source. Le coût de ce projet s'élève à 2,16 milliards de dollars.

  4. #18
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    ALGIERS, April 14, 2008 (Reuters) - Algeria's Sonatrach and Omani and Egyptian partners signed contracts with major construction companies on Monday for two ammonia and urea projects worth a total of $4.5 billion, the official APS news agency reported.

    An Algerian-Omani joint venture called Al Aldjazairia Al Omania Lil Asmida signed an engineering, procurement and construction contract with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries to build a factory costing $2.4 billion at Arzew, 600 kilometres (373 miles) west of the capital Algiers, APS reported.

    The joint venture between Sonatrach and Suhail Bahwan Group Holding (SBGH) of Oman has said the plant will produce 4,000 tonnes of ammonia and 7,000 tonnes of urea per day.

    The Omani group has a 51 percent stake in the project and Sonatrach 49 percent. Algerian officials say that the plant is due to come onstream in three and a half years.

    APS added that a joint venture between Sonatrach and Egypt's Orascom Construction Industries (OCI) signed an engineering and construction contract with Germany's Uhde, the plant engineering unit of ThyssenKrupp, also for an ammonia and urea plant at Arzew worth $2.16 billion.

    The joint venture, called Sorfert Algerie, plans to produce 4,400 tonnes a day of ammonia and 3,450 tonnes a day of urea, APS reported. OCI has a 51 percent stake in the venture while Sonatrach owns the remaining 49 percent.

    The North African country is rapidly expanding output of oil and natural gas and wants to invest heavily in petrochemicals to diversify the range of products for export and get more value from its energy supplies.

  5. #19
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    April 15, 2008 (Bloomberg) -- Daewoo Engineering & Construction Co. announced a $626.5 million contract to build part of a fertilizer factory in Algeria, helping it reach more than half of its 2008 target for overseas orders in less than four months.

    South Korea's biggest builder will help construct the $2.42 billion plant for El-Djazairia El-Omania Lil Asminda SpA, the Seoul-based company said in a regulatory filing today. The facility in Oran, about 350 kilometers west of Algiers, will be ready by April 2012. Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. also won part of the factory order, Daewoo Engineering said.

    The transaction raises Daewoo Engineering's overseas orders for the year to $1.66 billion, compared with its full-year forecast of $3 billion. South Korean construction companies have won overseas orders at a record pace this year, as economic growth and surging oil prices boost spending on refineries and infrastructure in the Middle East.

    The Algerian plant will have the capacity to produce 4,000 tons of ammonia a day, 7,000 tons of urea and 7,000 tons of ureal granulate, the company said.

    Daewoo Engineering gained 0.2 percent to 20,800 won as of 11:51 p.m. in Seoul. The stock has dropped 8.4 percent in the past year, compared with a 15 percent climb for South Korea's benchmark Kospi index.

  6. #20
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    Sonia Lyes :


    Mardi 15 Avril 2008 -- Le sud-coréen Daewoo Engineering & Construction a annoncé avoir signé un contrat de 625,5 millions de dollars pour la construction d’une partie d’une usine de fertilisants dans la région d’Oran, rapporte l’agence financière Bloomberg qui cite un porte-parole de la société.

    Cet accord qui porte sur un montant total de 2,42 milliards de dollars été conclu avec El-Djazairia El-Omania Lil Asminda SpA. Le groupe japonais Mitsubishi fait également partie du tour de table. D’une capacité de production de 4000 tonnes d’ammoniac par jour, de 7000 tonnes d’urée et de 7000 tonnes d’urée granulée, cette usine sera construite d’ici avril 2012.

  7. #21
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    April 15, 2008 (Bloomberg) -- Orascom Construction Industries, the biggest publicly traded builder in Egypt, and Sonatrach, the Algerian state-owned oil and gas company, received a 1.1 billion euro ($1.7 billion) loan for an Algeria fertilizer project.

    The loan will be used to finance the construction of a nitrogen-based fertilizer production plant in northwest Algeria, the Cairo-based company said in an e-mailed statement today.

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