+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 13 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 15 to 21 of 86
  1. #15
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Rafik Tayeb :

    Vendredi 28 Décembre 2007 -- L’instabilité politique au Liban, les attaques d’Al-Qaïda en Algérie et au Maroc figurent parmi les grands défis sécuritaires auxquels ont été confrontés les intérêts américains dans la région Afrique du Nord-Moyen-Orient en 2007, selon une analyse du Conseil de Comité de Sécurité à l’étranger (OSAC), un organisme qui dépend du département d’État américain.

    En Algérie, Selon les analystes de l’OSAC, l’ex-GSPC, devenu Al-Qaïda pour le Maghreb islamique (AQMI) constitue une menace sérieuse pour l’économie du pays. L’OSAC cite notamment les attaques contre des convois de sociétés occidentales qualifiées « d’attaques sophistiquées et ciblées ». «Utilisant une tactique sophistiquée, plusieurs attaques de l’AQMI ont visé des intérêts économiques publics et privés. Parmi elles, trois attaques ont ciblé des convois de société Occidentaux », souligne l’analyse rendue publique le jeudi 27 décembre dans la soirée sur le site Internet du Département d’État américain. Par ailleurs, les tentatives d’attentats suicide en avril dernier au Maroc font craindre le spectre d’une généralisation de l’action terroriste dans toute la région du Maghreb, selon l’OSAC.

    «Ces menaces en croissance sont parmi les nombreuses conséquences - certaines bonnes et certaines mauvaises - de mondialisation accrue », explique l’OSAC dans son rapport. Pour l’organisme américains, les entreprises et les institutions américaines opérant à l’étranger doivent intégrer la sécurité et la gestion des risques dans la pratique de leur métier.


  2. #16
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0
    Bureau of Diplomatic Security
    Washington, DC
    December 27, 2007


    Top 5 security trends in 2007 for the U.S. private sector in the Middle East and North Africa

    Political violence and instability in Lebanon, al-Qa’ida-related attacks in Algeria, and copycat attacks in Morocco were among the top security challenges that U.S. businesses, nongovernmental organizations and academic institutions confronted in the Middle East and North Africa in 2007, according to a year-end analysis by the Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC).

    “These growing threats are among the many consequences — some good, and some bad — of increased globalization,” said Todd Brown, a Special Agent with the Department of State’s Bureau of Diplomatic Security and Executive Director of OSAC.

    “As an increasing number of U.S. businesses, academic institutions, and nonprofits expand the scope of their international operations, they must learn to safeguard their facilities and personnel by incorporating security and risk management into their core business practices,” he said.

    Brown added, “Those U.S. entities that take proactive security postures, manage their risks, and develop an internal culture of resiliency often are better able to survive and even thrive in riskier environments or in the aftermath of disasters.”

    In North Africa, the terrorist group Al-Qa’ida in the Land of the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) demonstrated that it is a serious threat to both the government and private sector in Algeria, according to OSAC analysts. Noting attacks on Western company convoys and various plots to kidnap Westerners, OSAC warned that AQIM is using sophisticated attacks to target economic targets.

    Similar sophisticated attacks in neighboring Morocco have raised the specter of terrorism spreading throughout North Africa. “In Morocco, April suicide bombings at an internet café, the U.S. Consulate, and an American cultural center in Casablanca showed a presence of committed militants,” the OSAC analysis said.

    Political violence and instability posed the greatest threat to the American private sector in Lebanon over the past year, according to the OSAC review.

    OSAC noted that Lebanon had experienced several violent incidents over the past year, including low-level bombings, assassinations of several well-known anti-Syrian figures, and battles between military and extremists in Palestinian refugee camps. “These incidents have increased concerns that terrorist elements or sympathizers could take advantage of the situation in order to establish themselves and plot attacks against Lebanese or Western interests,” said OSAC.

    This year-end security review is based on security analyses and informational products developed by OSAC’s regional specialists and delivered to its private-sector members, explained Brown.

    “By working with our OSAC partners, sharing our analysis, and pushing out our information, we aim to help the U.S. private sector better prepare for, respond to, and recover from the security challenges that may arise in the coming year,” said Brown.

    The following is OSAC’s list of the past year’s top security challenges to the American private sector in the Middle East:

    Political instability in Lebanon

    For much of 2007, Lebanon’s dueling political blocs led some in the private sector to worry that the country could return to civil war if issues are not resolved to the satisfaction of all parties. Lebanon also experienced several tension-inducing incidents in the past year that have been political and/or sectarian in nature, including low-level bombings, assassinations of several well-known anti-Syrian figures, and battles between military and extremists in Palestinian refugee camps. These incidents have increased concerns that terrorist elements or sympathizers could take advantage of the situation in order to establish themselves and plot attacks against Lebanese or Western interests.

    Terrorist attacks in Algeria

    Violent terrorist attacks throughout Algeria over the last year have confirmed that AQIM (al-Qa’ida in the Land of the Islamic Maghreb) poses a serious threat to government and private sector entities. Using sophisticated tactics, several AQIM attacks targeted economic interests, including three attacks on Western company convoys. Other threat incidents included several suicide vehicle bombings (two of which were coordinated attacks on multiple high-profile targets in Algiers), a suicide vest used in an attack targeting Algeria’s president, as well as plots to kidnap Westerners.

    Potential spread of terrorism throughout North Africa

    Terrorist arrests, threats and incidents across North Africa in 2007, especially in Morocco, have led to fears that the impact of al-Qa’ida-linked organizations would be felt beyond Algeria. In Morocco, April suicide bombings at an internet café, the U.S. Consulate, and an American cultural center in Casablanca showed a presence of committed militants. While these attacks have not been directly linked to transnational or regional terrorist groups, they – and other plots uncovered against tourist areas in 2007 – demonstrate that Western interests are being targeted in the region and that they must maintain heightened awareness of their surroundings at all times.

    Terrorist plots in Saudi Arabia

    Large-scale arrests of suspected extremists plotting attacks against Saudi and foreign-owned oil facilities in 2007 demonstrates the country’s continued vulnerability to terrorist attacks. Planned attacks on major oil facilities were thwarted this year by active police work and increased security precautions around potential targets. Although suspected terrorist cells were unable to conduct successful attacks, continued attempts to strike oil-related targets has prompted the Saudi government to form an oil infrastructure protection force that is designed to secure pipelines, oil fields, and processing plants. The continued terrorist threat in Saudi Arabia has prompted the U.S. private sector to maintain elevated security protocols for western nationals operating in Saudi Arabia.

    Anti-Iraqi forces and political instability in Iraq

    U.S. and Iraqi military successes in Baghdad and the western province of Anbar have decreased the daily number of terrorist and militia attacks against Coalition forces and the Iraqi citizenry. However, despite significant Coalition and Iraqi Security Force (ISF) successes against groups such as al-Qa’ida in Iraq, the surge of additional U.S. military personnel and steadily increasing numbers of trained ISF can not yet provide consistent adequate security in specific areas outside of the Kurdistan Region, Baghdad, Anbar, and certain parts of other provinces. Criminal networks remain a significant threat to the conduct of free enterprise in Iraq. The U.S. private sector remains concerned that military successes against terrorist groups and sectarian militias in central and western Iraq could force terrorist and militia groups into the northern Kurdistan region. However, at this time violence associated with terrorist and militia activities has not increased in Kurdistan due to the U.S. and Iraqi military surge.

    ***

    About OSAC

    The Overseas Security Advisory Council was established in 1985 as a Federal Advisory Committee with a U.S. Government Charter to promote security cooperation between the U.S. Department of State and American business and private sector interests worldwide.

    With a constituency of more than 3,500 U.S. companies and other private-sector organizations with overseas interests, OSAC operates a Web site (OSAC - Overseas Security Advisory Council), which offers its members the latest in safety- and security-related information, public announcements, warden messages, travel advisories, significant anniversary dates, terrorist group profiles, country crime and safety reports, special topic reports, foreign press reports, and much more.

    The OSAC staff includes international security research specialists dedicated solely to serving the U.S. private sector. Additionally, OSAC has a network of 100 country councils around the world that brings together U.S. embassies and consulates with the local U.S. community to share security information.

    OSAC is co-chaired by the Director of the Diplomatic Security Service (DSS) and a selected representative of the private sector. The OSAC Executive Director is a Diplomatic Security Special Agent.

    About the Bureau of Diplomatic Security

    The Bureau of Diplomatic Security is the U.S. Department of State’s law enforcement and security arm. The special agents, engineers, and security professionals of the Bureau are responsible for the security of 285 U.S. diplomatic facilities around the world.

    In the United States, Diplomatic Security personnel investigate passport and visa fraud, conduct personnel security investigations, and protect the Secretary of State and high-ranking foreign dignitaries and officials visiting the United States. More information about the U.S. Department of State and the Bureau of Diplomatic Security may be obtained at Bureau of Diplomatic Security.

    Contact:
    Brian Leventhal
    571.345.2499
    FAX 571.345.2527
    LeventhalBH@state.gov

  3. #17
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Samedi 5 Janvier 2008 -- Le commissaire à la paix et à la sécurité de l'Union africaine (UA), Saïd Djinnit, a estimé samedi à Alger que «la menace terroriste dans la région sahélo-saharienne existe mais est exagérée», après l'annulation du rallye Paris-Dakar suite à des menaces d'Al-Qaïda au Maghreb.

    "Il y a certainement une menace et il faut la contenir, mais je pense que cette menace n'est pas aussi grande que certains veulent le faire penser", a-t-il ajouté, lors d'un atelier sur "l'architecture de paix de l'UA et la coopération sécuritaire sur le continent" à Alger. Il a expliqué que le plan d'action africain contre le terrorisme "met l'accent sur le renforcement de la coopération sécuritaire régionale et continentale pour limiter les possibilités d'action des réseaux terroristes".

    Le désarroi des populations africaines les rend vulnérables et sensibles à des idéologies extrêmes", a poursuivi M. Djinnit, préconisant d'"investir en même temps dans le développement du continent et dans la construction d'institutions de défense et de sécurité au sein des Etats africains". La menace terroriste "est là parce qu'elle profite, hélas, de l'absence d'institutions et de moyens, et de la porosité des frontières. Elle profite aussi des trafics en tous genres", a-t-il jugé.

    M. Djinnit a ajouté que l'objectif de la réunion d'Alger était "de prendre acte des progrès réalisés en matière de paix et de sécurité, et de déterminer les meilleures façons de renforcer la coopération entre l'UA et les différents regroupements africains régionaux".

    De son côté, le ministre à la coopération maghrébine et africaine, Abdelkader Messahel, a déclaré que l'Algérie s'employait "à conjuguer ses efforts avec les autres pays africains pour faire du règlement des problèmes de la paix et de la sécurité en Afrique une priorité". "Il est évident que les efforts consentis pour le développement sont tributaires des efforts engagés pour la mise en place d'un environnement définitivement apaisé et réconcilié avec lui-même", a-t-il estimé.

  4. #18
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Samedi 5 janvier 2008 -- L’expert international, M. Francis Perrin, a révélé que les marchés internationaux ont pris en compte les événements survenus en Algérie, et il a indiqué que les dernières explosions figurent parmi les facteurs qui ont contribué à la hausse des prix du pétrole, à l’instar des événements au Pakistan et au Nigéria.

    El Khabar : Les prix du pétrole ont enregistré des niveaux record, en atteignant le seuil de 100 dollars. Quels sont les facteurs qui ont contribué à cette hausse ?

    Francis Perrin : Premièrement. Il faut insister sur un point important : l’enregistrement de prix du pétrole à 100 dollars le baril les 2 et 3 janvier est intervenu dans un contexte particulier, vu qu’il s’agissait d’une période de congés sur les plus importantes places de Londres et New York, ce qui a induit une diminution de l’activité. Cependant, cela ne représente pas, naturellement, le principal facteur.

    El Khabar : Quels sont donc les facteurs qui contribuent à l’augmentation des prix du pétrole de façon inédite ?

    Francis Perrin : En premier lieu, il y a les tentions survenues dans certains pays producteurs et exportateurs, même si elles n’ont pas touché directement les installations pétrolières. Les perturbations que connait la ville de Port Harcourt au Nigéria ont influé sur les niveaux des prix, de même que les marchés ont pris en considération les évènements vécus par l’Algérie, étant donné qu’elle fait partie des producteurs et exportateurs de pétrole, et les explosions ont eu un impact sur la hausse enregistrée. Par ailleurs, les explosions du Pakistan, qui pourtant n’est pas producteur de pétrole, ont eu un impact spécial, du fait de l’assassinat de Benazir Bhutto. On peut ajouter à cela la tension permanente au nord de l’Irak et les opérations militaires turques contre les combattants du PKK, ainsi que ce qui se passe au Kenya et au Venezuela.

    El Khabar : Existe-il d’autres facteurs influents ?

    Francis Perrin : Le second facteur est lié à la situation du marché pétrolier car nous sommes en hiver, et à cette période on enregistre une augmentation de la demande, surtout en ce qui concerne les combustibles de chauffage, au Etats-Unis précisément.

    Il y a aussi un autre facteur relatif aux aspects économiques et financiers, qui concerne le recul du dollar par rapport aux principales monnaies, notamment l’euro.

  5. #19
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Jeudi 17 janvier 2008 -- La branche d’Al-Qaïda au Maghreb islamique (AQMI, ex-GSPC) compterait actuellement environ 1000 terroristes en activité en Algérie, selon les estimations d’une étude du cabinet de conseil britannique Oxford Analytica, rendue publique mercredi 16 janvier. Avec cette force, AQMI est considérée comme l’organisation terroriste la plus puissante de la région du Maghreb. Le chiffre constitue le double de celui avancé récemment par les services français de contre-espionnage : selon la DGSE, le nombre de terroristes affiliés à l’AQMI serait en effet de 500.

    Bien armés, ces militants islamistes - décrits comme le cœur résiduel des groupes salafistes en Algérie - se concentrent, selon le cabinet britannique, dans des zones montagneuses jugées « sûres » car difficiles d’accès pour les forces de sécurité. Selon Oxford Analytica, à l’exception de quelques coups d’éclats menés dans les grandes villes – attentats suicides à Alger et Batna, attaques contre les postes de police à Boumerdès… - les groupes du GSPC éprouvent de réelles difficultés à se déplacer et à mener des actions au-delà de leurs zones.

    « AQIM sait qu'elle ne peut pas affronter directement les forces de sécurité algériennes. Son objectif est de créer un climat d'insécurité dans les villes (…) avec comme objectif de décourager la présence d'étrangers et leurs investissements », notre Oxford Analytica.

    Le cabinet estime également que « la série d'attaques suicide à la bombe, qui ont ciblé à Alger et d'autres centres urbains depuis avril 2007, constituent des signaux d’un changement clair dans la tactique et la stratégie des terroristes en Algérie ». Le groupe terroriste a également modifié la nature de ses cibles : la première est l’État algérien et ses institutions et la seconde concerne la présence internationale en Algérie, avec les attentats contre le siège de l’ONU à Alger et des tentatives d’attaques contre des ressortissants étrangers.

  6. #20
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Lundi 21 Janvier 2008 -- Les groupes étrangers présents en Algérie continuent d'évacuer les familles de leurs expatriés. Après Michelin et Vinci fin 2007, c'est au tour de Renault et de BP de procéder au rapatriement en Europe des familles de leurs cadres expatriés, a appris toutsurlalgerie.com auprès de sources patronales. Le constructeur automobile français et le groupe pétrolier britannique ont pris cette mesure il y a quelques jours. La décision de Renault intervient après une année 2007 particulièrement bénéfique pour la marque au losange, arrivée première au classement général des constructeurs en matière de vente de voitures neuves.

    Les attentats suicides qui ont secoué la capitale le 11 décembre dernier auraient pesé dans la décision de Renault et BP. La recrudescence des attaques terroristes à travers le pays et le retour des attentats kamikazes dans la capitale inquiètent les patrons étrangers et les chancelleries occidentales.

    Les ambassades de Grande-Bretagne et des Etats-Unis déconseillent à leurs ressortissants de se rendre en Algérie, sauf cas d'extrême urgence. Les deux représentations ont évoqué des menaces terroristes sérieuses pour justifier ces consignes de sécurité. « Les patrons étrangers hésitent à venir en Algérie. Ils ont peur des attentats. Nos assurances et nos recommandations ne suffisent plus pour les faire venir », regrette un chef d'entreprise.

    En 2007, quatre attentats à la voiture piégée ont eu lieu dans la capitale : les deux premiers se sont produits le 11 mars et les seconds le 11 décembre. Ces deux derniers ont ciblé et détruit une partie du Conseil constitutionnel à Ben Aknoun et des bâtiments de l'ONU à Hydra.

  7. #21
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts