+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 13 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 ... LastLast
Results 22 to 28 of 86
  1. #22
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Jeudi 24 janvier 2008 -- Le rapatriement des familles des expatriés travaillant pour Renault en Algérie fait partie d’un dispositif global qui va concerner dans les prochains jours l’ensemble des entreprises américaines, britanniques et françaises.

    Selon une source proche des milieux d’affaires occidentaux à Alger, les entreprises britanniques et américaines ont été destinataires, il y a quelques jours, d’une lettre confidentielle émanant de leurs gouvernements les invitant à rapatrier l’ensemble des familles de leurs employés expatriés dans les meilleurs délais. Cette mesure aurait également été approuvée par la France. Interrogé par toutsurlalgerie.com, un porte-parole du Quai d’Orsay a toutefois indiqué que les « seules mesures que nous préconisons sont celles contenues dans notre rubrique « conseils aux voyageurs » régulièrement mise à jour. »

    Autre mesure conseillée dans la lettre aux groupes de ces deux pays : le non-remplacement des expatriés qui choisiraient de regagner leur pays d’origine en Europe ou aux Etats-Unis, et ce quelle que soit la raison qui motiverait ce départ. Selon la même source, les ambassades américaine et britannique en Algérie redoutent notamment l’apparition de kamikazes en motos qui prendraient pour cible les ressortissants étrangers à Alger et dans les grandes villes.

    Par ailleurs, une importante réunion regroupant les représentants des principaux groupes étrangers présents en Algérie devrait se tenir, jeudi soir, à l’hôtel Sofitel. Objectif : mettre en œuvre les nouvelles consignes et gérer la situation de crise née de la dégradation de la situation sécuritaire après les attentats du 11 décembre.

  2. #23
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

  3. #24
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

  4. #25
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Samedi 9 Février 2008 -- Société Générale va envoyer dans les prochains jours en Algérie une société spécialisée dans la sécurité afin de voir si les lieux de résidences de ses expatriés sont sûrs et sécurisés, selon des informations recueillies par toutsurlalgerie.com auprès d’une source proche de la filiale algérienne du groupe bancaire français.

    La venue en Algérie de cette société de sécurité a été décidée après la recrudescence des attentats kamikazes dans Alger et sa région. Elle intervient également au lendemain de nouvelles menaces d'Al-Qaïda contre les Occidentaux vivants au Maghreb.

    L'envoi de cette société de sécurité répond aussi aux demandes des sociétés d'assurances qui assurent les cadres expatriés en Algérie. Les assureurs ont augmenté les frais d'assurance des expatriés travaillant en Algérie après la série d'attentats suicides qui a secoué la capitale en 2007.

    Société Générale possède un réseau de 40 agences bancaires en Algérie où elle s'est présente depuis la fin des années 1990. Les groupes français Renault et Michelin ont procédé au rapatriement des familles des expatriés. D'autres conseillent à leurs cadres d'évacuer leurs familles en France pour des raisons de sécurité. En fait, les groupes occidentaux estiment que les attentats suicides vont se poursuivre en Algérie dans les prochains mois.

  5. #26
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    ALGIERS, February 13, 2008 (Reuters) - Al Qaeda attacks in Algeria grab the headlines and the Soviet-style administration approves deals at a glacial pace, yet the north African nation remains a draw for investors lured by its multibillion dollar opportunities.

    That in itself is an achievement, given the enormous obstacles that businesses face.

    A big twin bombing in December, which killed 41 people at a court building and U.N. offices, dented investor confidence, prompted the departure of dozens of dependents of expatriate workers and probably led to delays in exploratory trips by foreign companies interested in investment possibilities.

    But in the two months since the blasts, Algeria has held a crowded pan-Arab business conference, launched an oil and gas licensing round, announced a $46 billion energy investment plan and seen its growing foreign exchange reserves top $110 billion.

    It also assumed the rotating presidency of OPEC, entered the final steps of negotiating a $20 billion deal with Dubai-based Emaar Properties and hosted economic visitors from near and far including New Zealand Trade Minister Phil Goff.

    "For us local investors, the bombings changed absolutely nothing," Abdelouahab Rahim, president of Algerian insurance, retailing and construction firm Arcofina, told Reuters.

    "We are positive in the long term. These temporary, irregular incidents won't brake investment in the country."

    Speaking on the sidelines of a conference in Algiers packed with European and Arab tourism firms, he said Algeria's position would always make it an investment draw. "We're an hour's flight from Marseilles, an hour and something from Geneva."

    Brahim Bendjaber, President of the Algerian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, says extra hotel rooms had to be arranged at the last minute when it became clear that last month's Arab investment conference was oversubscribed.

    "Those people who visited Algiers had already seen the news (of the December bombs). But life goes on," said Bendjaber.

    Al Qaeda's North Africa wing said the December 11 attacks, the second big bombing in a year in the capital, had targeted what it called "the slaves of America and France".

    The government quickly arrested or killed most of the group that planned the attack, but said it could not guarantee that other al Qaeda-aligned cells may not try a repeat performance.

    Foreigners agree. British ambassador Andrew Henderson told a conference in London last week that while he was upbeat about Algeria long-term, as far as attacks were concerned: "We have to face the prospect that there will be more to come."

    Trevor Witton, BP North Africa adviser, said Algeria had responded impressively to the attacks, but added: "Only time will tell whether this will fully restore investor confidence."

    High oil prices have helped Algeria, a developing north African country of 33 million, launch a $140 billion five-year development plan and repay a large part of its foreign debt.

    While no foreign firm has left since December, there may be some who have deferred investing, anxious that security costs may be too big a burden on top of the already onerous task of engaging with Algeria's complex and slow-moving administration.

    "Some investors considering coming to Algeria will have hesitated," said Wolfram Lacher of Control Risks consultancy.

    Oil and gas firms will always find a way of staying in a country with Africa's biggest gas reserves: They stayed put during a much worse period of political violence in the 1990s.

    But other firms able to provide the large numbers of service and industrial jobs needed by a population suffering deep levels of unemployment may have decided to wait and see.

    "I can't think of any firm that has written Algeria off," said Henry Wilkinson, an analyst at Janusian Security Risk Management. "But companies do wobble. There is a concern."

    The attacks have led to a tightening of security in Algiers. But protecting buildings inside the cramped capital is hard.

    The minimum 30-metre gap from curbside to wall sought by security consultants is rarely available in a city of winding narrow streets on a hillside overlooking the Mediterranean.

    Perhaps as potentially damaging to investment is Algeria's relative silence in the face of astute al Qaeda Web-based propaganda, consultants say.

    "Algeria news tends to be bombs. That's what people know, because they don't hear about anything else," said Wilkinson.

    With the notable exception of Energy and Mines Minister Chakib Khelil, Algerian officials can appear reluctant to pitch the case for trade and investment to the media and wider public.

    The habit stems from a long tradition of revolutionary secrecy dating back to the independence war against France.

    Even admirers of Algeria complain that leaves the field free for al Qaeda. Olga Maitland, President of the British Algerian Business Council, wants Algerian officials to speak up: "They have everything. The only thing is, no one knows about it."

  6. #27
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Mardi 19 Février 2008 -- Le ministère français des Affaires étrangères, dans une note postée lundi 18 février sur son site Internet, a, une nouvelle fois, recommandé aux Français se rendant en Algérie «de faire preuve d’une grande vigilance, de limiter les déplacements à l’intérieur du pays (...).»

    Selon le Quai d’Orsay, après l’attentat terroriste qui a coûté la vie récemment à 8 gendarmes dans la région d’El-Oued, «les autorités algériennes peuvent être amenées à déconseiller voire à interdire les déplacements dans certaines zones ou sur certains itinéraires. Il est donc nécessaire de se renseigner précisément auprès des agences de voyage locales (auxquelles il est obligatoire d’avoir recours pour les voyages dans le grand Sud), directement ou par l’intermédiaire d’agences étrangères, afin de connaître les conditions et les itinéraires possibles pour des voyages touristiques dans cette région. »

    «Cette fiche est régulièrement mise à jour. La seule nouveauté concerne la situation dans le sud pays. Nous expliquons seulement que les autorités algériennes pourraient être amenés à interdire les déplacements dans certaines zones de cette région », relativise un porte-parole du Quai d’Orsay.

    Pour Paris, il n’y aurait aucun élément nouveau qui justifierait une modification radicale des conseils aux Français se rendant en Algérie. Pourtant, la semaine dernière, La Lettre de l’Expansion, une publication bien informée, évoquait un rapport de la Direction du renseignement militaire français faisant état d’un risque d’attentat imminent contre des objectifs étrangers en Algérie et/ou en Mauritanie. « Nous tenons compte de l’évolution de la situation sur le terrain », s’est contenté de commenter le porte-parole des affaires étrangères françaises.

  7. #28
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Mercredi 20 Février 2008 -- A peine un mois après que la Coface eut classé l’Algérie parmi «les pays les mieux notés dans le monde» en matière de risques pour les entreprises, le ministère français des Affaires étrangères a, cependant, réitéré avant-hier ses «recommandations» aux Français désirant se rendre à l’intérieur de notre pays, les exhortant «à faire preuve d’une grande vigilance» et de suivre avec «une extrême précaution» les «consignes de sécurité». Un paradoxe qui cacherait des ambitions inavouées ?

    Dans une note «mise à jour», avant-hier, mais qui «reste toujours valable», est-il mentionné sur son site internet, le Quai d’Orsay recommande aux ressortissants français «de faire preuve d’une grande vigilance, de limiter les déplacements à l’intérieur du pays et de suivre avec une extrême précaution les consignes de sécurité». Outre les attentats du 11 décembre dernier et «la menace renouvelée» – et qui «ne peut être ignorée» – d’El-Qaïda à l’encontre des intérêts français», l’attentat terroriste qui a coûté la vie récemment à 8 gendarmes dans la région d’El-Oued, suffisent largement au département de Bernard Kouchner pour tomber dans un alarmisme démesuré.

    Le comble est que Paris considère, en usant bien évidemment d’un curieux langage diplomatique, que les vies des ressortissants français qui se risqueraient à mettre leurs pieds dans le Sud algérien seraient menacées même par les forces de l’ANP qui y mènent des opérations antiterroristes. «A la suite d’attaques menées par des groupes terroristes dans le Sud algérien, notamment dans la région d’El-Oued, et d’opérations menées en réponse par les forces armées, les autorités algériennes peuvent être amenées à déconseiller, voire interdire les déplacements dans certaines destinations et certains itinéraires», est-il en effet écrit dans la note du Quai d’Orsay.

    Pour cela, «il est donc nécessaire, souligne le ministère français, de se renseigner précisément auprès des agences de voyages locales (auxquelles il est obligatoire d’avoir recours pour les voyages dans le Grand Sud), directement ou par l’intermédiaire d’agences étrangères, afin de connaître les conditions et les itinéraires possibles pour des voyages touristiques dans cette région».

    Néanmoins, l’alarmisme dont fait preuve la France quand il s’agit de mettre en garde les potentiels touristes français désirant venir chez nous contredit les appréciations favorables faites, au sujet de notre pays, par la Coface. Cette agence d’assurance française qui évalue le risque dans 155 pays a gratifié, à la fin de janvier seulement, l’Algérie de la notation A4 qui correspond à «un assez bon» risque pour les entreprises et les investisseurs. Quelques jours auparavant, Alain Tovar, représentant de la Coface Algérie Services (Cals), soulignait que notre pays «fait partie des pays les mieux notés par la Coface dans le monde», incitant ainsi «les sociétés françaises à venir investir le marché algérien qui offre le même environnement qu’en France et au Japon».

    En termes plus simples, la France semble dire à ses ressortissants : «N’allez en Algérie que si vous avez des automobiles, des équipements électromécaniques ou des produits pharmaceutiques à écouler, mais jamais en touristes dans le Sahara ou ailleurs.» Mais pour les observateurs avertis, cette ambivalence de la France au sujet des «menaces» qui pèseraient sur le Sud algérien ne peut être assimilée que si elle est inscrite dans le cadre plus large du souci de la France de sauvegarder son «pré-carré africain». Souvenons-nous de l’épisode de l’annulation du rallye Lisbonne-Dakar à cause de présumées menaces d’El-Qaïda. Il ne faudrait pas non plus perdre de vue le dispositif Epervier qui a sauvé la mise au président Idris Déby Itno, mais surtout l’Eufor, force européenne stationnée à l’est du Tchad et de la Centrafrique aux confins du Darfour soudanais, officiellement pour protéger les populations déplacées.

    Cette débauche d’énergie de la France semble plaire à l’allié américain qui nourri de «nobles objectifs» pour l’Afrique à travers son projet de l’Africom. Au début de son périple africain, George W Bush n’a-t-il pas apprécié le «travail responsable de la France au Tchad, dans son rôle de mise sur pied d’une force européenne pour aider les victimes du conflit du Darfour» ? «Je crois effectivement que l’instabilité au Darfour affecte le Tchad et les intérêts français», a-t-il encore ajouté, comme pour rassurer la France sur les chasses gardées postcoloniales des Européens en Afrique. En actualisant le fameux cri romain «Hannibal est à nos portes !» la France persiste à croire, et ce n’est pas le Point qui la contredira, que nous n’avons vraiment rien compris.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 13 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts