+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 7 of 50
  1. #1
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Le commerce informel / Algeria's black market economy:

    ALGIERS, June 12 (Reuters) - Algeria's Islamist-driven black market could pose a political menace if it keeps growing, a business leader said on Tuesday, adding intelligent foreign investment was the best way of countering a "bazaar" economy.

    Redha Hamiani, president of the Business Leaders Forum, said the informal sector, long tolerated by the state as a safety valve for youth unemployment, now had a sizeable hold on the weak non-energy sector of the north African country's economy.

    "The informal sector poses a lot of danger," Hamiani, a former government minister, told Reuters in an interview.

    "If there isn't a serious revival of investment and growth with a foreign contribution, we risk sinking not only into the informal sector but also into Islamism," he added, referring to an ideology that advocates an Islamic state.

    "If one leaves the national economy to evolve without the contribution of foreign investors and without state regulation the result is a bazaar economy."

    The big country on the southern shores of the Mediterranean is gradually recovering from 15 years of often brutal conflict between Islamist rebel groups and government forces.

    The Islamist revolt has largely been quelled and Islamist groups are on the defensive politically, but they have emerged as important economic players through their black market role.

    The National Economic and Social Council think tank estimates the parallel market in OPEC-member Algeria is worth 32 to 38 percent of non-oil gross domestic product.

    The state-owned Council estimates 700 informal street markets emerged in the politically turbulent 1990s, selling everything from counterfeit car spare parts to gold.

    Many are controlled by Islamists, and Hamiani said they now constituted a network of influence outside state control.

    "The informal sector is the translation in economic terms of hostility to the government ... not to obey the rules, the law, not pay taxes and not present bills.

    "Networks of vested interests became established, and today the big actors of the informal sector are Islamic leaders."

    Hamiani, whose forum groups 120 business leaders including bankers who employ a total of 128,000 Algerians, estimated 40 percent of money in circulation is outside the banking system. Officials have tolerated the black market's growth, conscious of the need to create wealth and jobs in order to shore up political stability. The unemployment rate among adults under 30 is more than 70 percent, according to official figures.

    Hamiani said this tolerance had "a high price".

    "The informal sector started with suitcases. Now it's containers - and also a state of mind."

    "This state of mind has brought lots of connections. Before, we had petty corruption but it was manageable and marginal. But with the informal sector, corruption has grown. What is serious today is that the informal sector has a hold on the economy."

    Hamiani said quality foreign investment and firmer state regulation would counter the black market's growth.

    "Quality investment can be made only by foreigners because the key thing they bring is technology and know-how," he said, adding multinational investors' compliance with business standards would rub off on local firms and boost performance.

    Better state regulation was also vital, he said, complaining the antiquated Soviet-style bureaucracy hindered business.


  2. #2
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    ALGIERS, March 12, 2008 (Reuters) - Algeria's informal sector is a threat to economic growth but not to its overall stability, President Abdelaziz Bouteflika said on Wednesday of a growing phenomenon critics say is dominated by Islamist businessmen.

    In written replies to submitted questions, Bouteflika added that the government was trying to modernise the centralised economy, boost the private sector, which was "still young", and reduce the OPEC member country's dependence on oil and gas.

    "Wherever it exists and whoever the culprit, the informal economy is a danger that threatens economic expansion, notably through unfair trade, the decline in production, the loss of tax income, as well as the risks for public health and security," he said.

    "These are phenomena that we find everywhere in varied degrees, including in developed countries. In Algeria this phenomenon exists of course, but not to a level that represents a danger for the stability of the country."

    Economic commentators say the black market, apparently tolerated by state officials as a safety valve for youth unemployment, now has a sizeable hold on the weak non-energy sector and could pose a political menace if it keeps growing.

    The big country on the southern shores of the Mediterranean, almost totally reliant on oil and gas for its foreign exchange earnings, is gradually recovering from 15 years of often brutal conflict between Islamist rebel groups and government forces.

    The Islamist revolt has largely been quelled and analysts say Islamist groups are on the defensive politically, but they have emerged as important economic players through their black market role.

    The National Economic and Social Council government think tank estimates the parallel market in Algeria is worth 32 to 38 percent of non-oil GDP.

    Bouteflika told Reuters the government was fighting graft, money laundering, smuggling and forgery, while promoting control mechanisms and creating "new economic champions".

    "The reforms have...allowed for banks to take a bigger role in the economy, reduced fiscal pressure, the liberalisation of foreign trade, the commercial convertibility of the national currency, simplification of customs formalities."

    The International Monetary Fund said Algerian real GDP growth rose to 4.6 percent in 2007 from two percent in 2006, reflecting strong growth in the nonhydrocarbon sector, driven by services and construction and public works.

    The president, who has launched an $150 billion economic reconstruction programme, is accused by critics of hesitating to reform a command economy dominated by loss-making state banks and blighted by inadequate access to credit.

    But Bouteflika suggested that centralisation of the economy, entrenched after independence from France in 1962 by an embrace of socialism and collectivism, would eventually weaken.

    "The private sector is still young in our country. It is, of course, only the product of our economic history. As you know, our economy was essentially administrative and centrally managed for many decades."

    "Nonetheless you can see that several private Algerian industrial firms are doing business today and have been leaders in different economic sectors for some years now."

  3. #3
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Ali Idir :


    Mercredi 19 Mars 2008 -- Entamée en 2007, la hausse de l'euro sur le marché parallèle des devises se poursuit. La monnaie unique européenne s'approche à présent de la barre symbolique de 120 dinars l'unité. Un record historique. Dans les banques, l'euro s'échange entre 105 et 106 dinars l'unité.

    Après une très forte baisse en 2006 due en très grande partie à l'interdiction d'importer les voitures de moins de 3 ans, l'euro reprend donc l'ascenseur et revitalise du coup le marché noir des devises.

    Le premier facteur qui peut expliquer cette hausse de l'euro sur le marché noir pourrait être l'effet d'annonce par le gouvernement début 2008 de la levée, durant cette année, de l'interdiction d'importer les véhicules de moins de 3 ans. Explications : importateurs et particuliers achètent des euros pour, éventuellement, acquérir des voitures d'occasion à l'étranger, une fois l'interdiction levée. Les banques n'accordent pas de crédits pour financer l'achat de voitures usagées à l'étranger.

    Le deuxième facteur serait la présence de plus en plus importante en Algérie de travailleurs étrangers, notamment asiatiques et africains. Ces derniers sont généralement rémunérés en dinars. Et pour envoyer des devises à leurs familles restées dans leur pays d'origine, ils reconvertissent les dinars en euros dans les bureaux de change clandestins, loin de tout contrôle de l'Etat.

    Le troisième et dernier facteur pourrait être la suppression de la loi des 20 millions de dinars pour la création de sociétés d'importations. Entrée en vigueur en 2007, cette loi n'est plus en vigueur depuis janvier 2008, ce qui a sans doute permis aux petits importateurs, sans grands moyens financiers, de reprendre les opérations d'importation. Pour financer leurs achats à l'étranger, les petits importateurs s'approvisionnent en euros généralement auprès du marché parallèle afin d'éviter les procédures et les lenteurs bancaires pour l'obtention de crédits en devises.

  4. #4
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Dimanche 23 mars 2008 -- Les marchés informels sont à l’origine de la dégradation du cadre de vie et des dysfonctionnements du tissu urbain. Le commerce se pratique en plein air dans les rues, quartiers et cités lesquels, dès la levée du jour, sont envahis par des jeunes, moins jeunes et adultes, qui proposent des marchandises dont on ne connait ni l’état, ni l’origine, encore moins la composante, à des prix attractifs. Ces marchands occasionnels, sans registre de commerce, sont constamment sur le qui-vive, dans la crainte d’être appréhendés par les services de la sûreté. Le soir venu, ils laissent derrière eux des montagnes de déchets et ordures, rendant la tâche difficile aux agents de nettoiement, nuisant ainsi au cadre de vie déjà mis à mal par l’absence d’entretien du bâti, des routes, des espaces verts et des lieux publics.

    Cette situation, qui consacre la clochardisation de la vie sociale, ne peut plus durer, sinon elle mènera celle-ci tout droit à la déchéance, au moment où l’on parle de création de pôles touristiques d’excellence, dont Annaba fait partie. L’association Bled El Anneb tire la sonnette d’alarme, proposant de remédier à cette situation par la préservation du patrimoine historique et du cadre de vie. Celle-ci a présenté, mercredi dernier, à la Chambre de commerce et d’industrie Seybouse (CCI), un projet de création de marchés de proximité, destinés à lutter contre les activités commerciales informelles. Les objectifs de ce projet, proposé par l’association Bled El Anneb, visent à « intégrer les sites périphériques de la ville au périmètre » et à « créer un rapport physique entre les différents quartiers à travers le déplacement croisé des habitants en quête d’un besoin hors de leur espace urbain ».

    Ces marchés de proximité s’inscrivent également dans la lutte contre la promiscuité et l’occupation anarchique des espaces publics, faits pour la circulation, de même qu’ils participent à l’animation qualitative et durable dans les quartiers et cités où ils sont implantés, à la résorption du chômage, et à la création de pôles de rencontres citoyennes. La ville de Annaba compte 6 marchés informels, à savoir Saf Saf, El Hattab, la cité du 11 Décembre 1960, Didouche Mourad, Oued Forcha et place du 10 Août 1956, selon les statistiques de l’association Bled El Anneb, qui estime que « ce nombre ne reflète pas la réalité du commerce informel, qui se pratique même sur les murs ». Ces marchés, qui couvrent plus d’un hectare d’espaces urbains, sont exploités dans la plus totale illégalité par 621 personnes, exerçant le commerce des fruits et légumes, d’habillement et chaussures. Un comité, composé de citoyens de divers horizons socioprofessionnels, a été désigné lors de cette rencontre pour réfléchir sur la faisabilité de ce projet et de son impact sur la société, avant d’être soumis aux pouvoirs publics.

  5. #5
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

  6. #6
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Mercredi 16 Avril 2008 -- Des pharmaciens mettent en garde contre l’achat de médicaments hors circuit règlementaire. Cette alerte donnée par les professionnels vient suite à l’apparition d’un phénomène nouveau sur le marché informel. Un médicament, un corticoïde, est en vente chez les marchands ambulants de la ville nouvelle et de Sidi El Bachir alors qu’il ne peut être commercialisé que sur ordonnance. Ce produit est disponible chez les commerçants africains qui exposent leur marchandise, composée de cosmétiques, herbes et autres à même le sol. Il est présenté aux clients qui souffrent de maigreur et désirent prendre du poids. Selon un pharmacien qui s’est procuré lui-même ce médicament chez l’un des marchands de Sidi El Bachir, «le produit a été acheté à 700 dinars le flacon contenant 100 comprimés et ne comportant aucune notice». Sur l’emballage, une petite boite dorée, est écrit en rouge «Dexamethasone», flacon de 100 comprimés avec un sigle, en forme de feuille, du laboratoire producteur. En bas de la boite, on peut lire en anglais, «manufactured by Unlink Pharma (P) LTD, India». Quant au flacon, il est de couleur grise avec un couvercle vert et portant aussi une étiquette sur laquelle est bien mentionné que le médicament ne doit être vendu que sur prescription médical et doit être placé à l’abri de la lumière et dans un endroit à température moyenne. Cependant, malgré ces indices, le médicament, on ne le trouve pas chez les pharmaciens, mais chez des commerçants clandestins. Contacté pour donner son avis sur ce produit, un pharmacien a été stupéfait de constater qu’un médicament fabriqué pour soigner des rhumatismes, soit recommandé, par des commerçants qui n’ont aucune relation avec la profession, pour les personnes qui veulent grossir. Ce spécialiste dans le domaine affirme qu’effectivement d’après ce qui est mentionné sur la boite, ce médicament est bien un corticoïde et ne doit être prescrit que par le médecin. Il explique aussi que les corticoïdes font grossir et cela ne signifie nullement qu’ils sont destinés pour les personnes maigres.

    Risque imminent

    Un médecin généraliste a indiqué, pour sa part, que de tel médicament peut être dangereux pour la santé s’il est pris sans un avis médical. «Il n’y a que les pharmaciens qui sont autorisés à vendre les médicaments. Un corticoïde n’est donné que par le médecin et sur ordonnance car il peut avoir des effets secondaires. La personne mise sous un tel traitement, ne grossit pas mais peut avoir des enflures». Sur la gravité de prendre ce médicament juste pour prendre du poids, le même médecin affirme que «si une personne prend un corticoïde de façon prolongée, elle peut avoir de graves problèmes de tension artérielle et de reins et peut facilement attraper le diabète». Sur la notice d’un corticoïde, il est clairement mentionné que le produit provoque «gonflements, rougeur du visage, prise de poids, une élévation de la tension artérielle, l’apparition de bleus, trouble du sommeil, fragilité osseuse, trouble de la croissance chez l‘enfant, faiblesse des muscles, ulcère et glaucome». Revenant sur le problème de la disponibilité de ce médicament sur le marché informel, un pharmacien évoque le problème des produits pharmaceutiques qui «échappent» au contrôle. Il affirme que tous les médicaments vendus chez les officines sont contrôlés au niveau des laboratoires, tandis que ceux qui sont sur le marché informel ne peuvent provenir que des particuliers qui transportent des quantités de médicaments dans des valises et les font rentrer dans leurs bagages en voyageant par avion ou par bateau. Aucune mesure n’a été prise dans ce sens pour lutter contre ce phénomène qui touche à la santé publique.

  7. #7
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 8 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts