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  1. #36
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    São Paulo, January 15, 2008 – Shipments of women's shoes by Brazilian brands Piccadilly and Via Uno to the Arab market are growing. Of all Brazilian exports of female shoes to Oman, for example, 19.5% are by Piccadilly. Via Uno, which exports 6% of production to the Arab countries, in turn, believes that sales to the region of greater value-added products should continue rising.

    Both companies are exhibiting at the 35th Couromoda – the International Shoes, Sportsgoods and Leathergoods Fair – and received Arab importers yesterday, the first day of the event. Via Uno hopes to close a new order with a client in Dubai, who already has five franchises in the United Arab Emirates. "Dubai is an interesting market and is growing very much," stated the export manager at the company, Jadir Bergonsi.

    According to the export manager at Piccadilly, Micheline Grings Twigger, the company also hopes to meet its exclusive clients from the Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. "The Middle Eastern market has been growing as a destination for our exports," he said. In company exports, the Arab market only loses to South and Central America.

    The female shoes by Piccadilly also have strong representation in Kuwait, to where the company is responsible for 17% of all Brazilian female shoe exports. To Lebanon, the company had 14.2% participation in exports, and to Bahrain, 13%. "We sell all shoe lines to the Arabs, and make no modification," stated Micheline.

    According to her, the company already works with exclusive clients in nine countries. "The search for our brand is great. Many Arabs seek us wanting to be distributors," she said. Piccadilly, which started exporting to the Middle East in 2000, wants to win the countries of North Africa this year, including Tunisia, Algeria, Egypt and Libya. "For the brand to continue growing on the Arab market we want to have an exclusive client in each country," she finished off.

    Piccadilly exports to 70 countries and around 30% of production is turned to the foreign market, being 10% to the Arab market. "It is a very important market to us," stated Micheline. At the fair, the company is bringing a new line of female shoes: Sport Comfort, which makes very comfortable shoes in varied colours. Apart from closed shoes, Piccadilly is exporting boots, sandals and sneakers.

    The Via Uno stand is also bringing novelties in shoes and female handbags. The winter colours that the company is betting on this year are tones of grey, graphite, violet, red and black. The leather textures have been given finishing in varnish, which should be successful among Brazilian and foreign women.

  2. #37
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    São Paulo, January 17, 2008 – More than growing, trade between Brazil and the Arab countries has diversified in 2007. Brazil exported 2,253 different products to the region last year, against 2,099 in 2006, an increase of 7.34%. The number of items sold by the Arabs, in turn, rose from 654 to 783, growth of almost 20%.

    "This is work developed by the Chamber that has proved itself successful: the diversification of the export basket," said the president at the Arab Brazilian Chamber of Commerce, Antonio Sarkis Jr. "Brazilian agribusiness, for example, is already important to the Arabs, it has been identified and is renowned. But we are also working on placing manufactured products on that market," he added.

    Agribusiness products – basic, semi manufactured and manufactured – answer to 66% of Brazilian exports to the Arabs in 2007. The chamber is also trying to expand the sales of greater value-added products in this area, focussing on industrialized foods.

    The main destinations for Brazilian exports in 2007 were Saudi Arabia, which imported the equivalent to US$ 1.4 billion, Egypt, whose imports totalled US$ 1.2 billion, the United Arab Emirates (US$ 1.2 billion), Algeria (US$ 501 million) and Morocco (US$ 438 million).

    The main suppliers to Brazil were Algeria, which exported the equivalent to US$ 2.2 billion, Saudi Arabia, whose exports were US$ 1.7 billion, Libya (US$ 992 million), Morocco (US$ 553 million) and the Emirates (US$ 320 million).

    Apart from diversification of products, the Chamber also wants to expand the Brazilian participation in other Arab markets, like Oman and Yemen. According to the organisation, the economy of Yemen and the country's exports are expected to grow.

    Oman, in turn, already presents strong demand for several products and has in development several projects in the fields of tourism and building. To have an idea, exports from Brazil to Oman generated US$ 93.5 million in 2007, an increase of 57% over 2006.

  3. #38
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    São Paulo, January 18, 2008 – At least 35 Brazilian companies are going to participate in the Gulfood, the main fair in the food and beverage sector in the Middle East, to take place in Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates, between February 24th and 27th. Out of the total, 12 companies should be taken by the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply and by the Arab Brazilian Chamber of Commerce, which will have its own stand at the fair for the first time. The others are associates of the Brazilian Beef Industry and Exporters Association (Abiec), the Brazilian Poultry Exporters Association (Abef) and the Brazilian Fruit Institute (Ibraf).

    Yesterday, representatives of several companies were at the Arab Brazilian Chamber offices in São Paulo to discuss the details of the trip with representatives from the organisation and from the ministry. "The growth of Brazilian exports to the Arab countries is greatly due to agribusiness, but there is still space for products from Brazil, especially foods," stated the secretary general at the Chamber, Michel Alaby, who gave details about the market in the region.

    Agribusiness exports to the Arab world generated US$ 4.6 billion last year, 66% of all that Brazil sold to the region. The director of the Trade Promotion Department at the Ministry of Agriculture, Eduardo Sampaio Marques, pointed out, however, that business is still greatly concentrated on few products, like cattle beef, chicken and sugar.

    Marques gave examples of niches in the countries of the region that may be better explored by Brazilian companies, among them dairy products, biscuits and bakery products, fruit, chocolate, cocoa and coffee products in Saudi Arabia, dairy products, fruit, chocolate, rice and spices in the Emirates, soy, maize and dairy products in Egypt and coffee, maize, apples and dairy products in Algeria.

    Brazil already exports products in these sectors to the Arab countries, but the existing demand permits further expansion of sales. Algeria, for example, is the second main buyer of Brazilian dairy products, losing only to Venezuela, but the country imports the equivalent to US$ 650 million in sector products per year, and the Brazilian participation is just US$ 55 million.

    Gulfood, like several of the fairs that take place in Dubai, serves as a meeting point for importers from several countries in the region and outside it. According to Alaby, 40% of the visitors to the fair are foreign. Last year, 37,618 visitors from 140 countries participated in the event.

    Alaby pointed out, however, that in the Gulf market Brazil competes with other strong suppliers, like the United Stats, countries in Europe and also in Asia. "The product must be differentiated," he said. As examples he mentioned organic food and halal baby food, prepared according to Islamic demands. He also pointed out that halal certification for food serves as quality certification of the product, not just in the religious point of view, but also in the sanitary aspect.

    The secretary general at the Arab Brazilian Chamber added that the market in the Gulf has few tariff barriers and should be seen as a complementary market for Brazilian products, especially at a time in which the European Union imposes barriers to imports and in which there is uncertainty regarding the economy in the United States.

    "We must work the Gulf market a little more," he said, recalling that the smashing majority of agribusiness products consumed in the region are imported. Alaby added that on entering the Arab countries food producers may start selling to other Islamic countries, like Iran, Indonesia and Malaysia.

    He also pointed out that the Emirates serve as a distribution centre to the "expanded" Middle East, which includes North Africa, the Levant region (Syria, Lebanon, Palestine and Jordan), the Gulf and Asian nations, like Pakistan and the former Soviet republics. To give an idea: the country which has a population of just 4.9 million inhabitants has annual exports of US$ 172 billion and imports of US$ 134 billion, i.e., bilateral trade greater than that of Brazil, aligned with average annual Gross Domestic Product growth of around 7%.

    Among the companies to participate in the Chamber and Ministry stand at the fair are suppliers of coffee, dairy products, cheese, pasta, chocolate and sweets, among others. One of them is Itambé, one of the main dairy producers in Brazil, to participate in the fair for the first time. "It is a very important market for powdered milk and we have already sold large volumes to Jordan and Iraq," stated the export manager at the company, André Luiz Massote Monteiro. "We have recently been travelling to Africa and the Americas very much, it is now time to focus on the Middle East," he added.

    The company sells regularly to Algeria, Sudan, Libya and Lebanon and, during the Gulfood, wants to learn about the market in the Gulf and prospect potential clients. The organisation is going to offer powdered, condensed and evaporated milk. "Our idea is to open new captive markets with greater value-added products," said Monteiro.

    Another company to participate in the fair is Tirolez, a maker of cheeses. According to the person responsible for the export department, Paulo Hegg, the company had previously decided to concentrate its efforts on two of the main food fairs in the world, Anuga, in Germany, and Sial, in France, but is now expanding its horizons.

    "This is the first time that we are going to actively participate in a fair other than the two main ones," stated Hegg. He wants to learn about the main competitors in the market, find importers, check what product modifications are necessary and complete deals. In the region, Tirolez already exports to Lebanon and is going to offer cheese like provolone, mozzarella, cottage cheese and Parmesan.

    Another company interested in participating is Florestal Alimentos, the owner of chocolate brand Neugebauer. The company intends to show a broad line of products, like chocolates, sweets, lollipops and chewing gum. The company, according to Daniella Padilha, in the export area, has already been selling to the Arab market for over 10 years and has Palestine as one of its main destinations in the region. The company has never participated in the Gulfood. "Participating in the fair is good to keep relations with clients and develop new business," stated Daniella.

    Another company that already traditionally exports to the region is Cacique, the owner of Pelé Coffee. According to Argélia Andrade, who is responsible for the company's business in the Arab world, the company wants to consolidate markets where they do not yet have representatives, like Dubai, Saudi Arabia, Algeria and Egypt. "We want to find a representative and to close deals," she said.

    Gulfood has been taking place since 1987. At the end of last year, the event brought together 2,471 exhibitors from 75 countries in 56 pavilions. According to Alaby, this year the fair should cover 20% more space. The event is only open to the visitation of professionals in the area who are over 21 years of age.

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    São Paulo, January 21, 2008 – The Association of the Manufacturers of Medical and Dental Products (Abimo), in partnership with the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil), is going to take 38 companies to Arab Health, a sector fair to take place in Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates, between January 28th and 31st. "Last year's edition of the fair was excellent, and we hope that this year's edition will be too," stated the executive director at Abimo, Hely Audrey Maestrello.

    Last year, the 34 Brazilian companies that participated in the fair closed deals of approximately US$ 1.3 million at the event. For this edition, the forecast of the organisations is to close deals of US$ 1.5 million. According to Maestrello, the contacts made at the fair may generate over US$ 12 million in contacts over the next 12 months. "It is a market with great potential," he said. Apart from that, the Abimo director bets that the sympathy the Arabs have for Brazilians may help close new deals.

    According to Maestrello, exports of medical, hospital and dentistry products to the Arab countries are growing. He estimates that sales last year may have grown 30% over 2006, when they reached US$ 5 million. The Arab nations that import most Brazilian sector products are Algeria, the United Arab Emirates, Lebanon, Jordan, Yemen, Egypt, Morocco, Syria, Iraq, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia.

    According to Maestrello, the Arab nations are not yet the main destinations for Brazilian exports, but they are among the most important. "There are already companies that turn 30% of their exports to the Arab market," he said. The main products shipped to the region are for the dentistry sector, cardiac monitors, surgery equipment, hospital beds, anaesthetic equipment and inhalers, among others.

    Apart from Arab Health, which the Abimo is going to participate in for the 5th time, the organisation is also planning participation in another fair in Dubai this year, the AEEDC, in the dentistry sector. This will be the second time that Brazilian companies are going to participate in the event. According to Maestrello, the number of companies participating in the fair has also been growing. This year, 18 companies have already enrolled, against 14 in 2006, the last edition in which Abimo participated.

    According to the director at the organisation, Arab Health is already considered the second most important fair for the association, losing only to Medica, in Germany. "The Arabs buy all the showrooms companies take. That is great. They do good business," stated Maestrello. Even with the question of appreciation of the Brazilian real against the dollar, Maestrello believes that good deals will be closed at the fair. "We have quality products with high technology," he said. "Brazil has been gaining more and more credibility," he finished off.

    Brazilian dentistry and medical-hospital products are already exported to over 100 countries. According to Maestrello, the Brazilian dentistry sector has already been on the foreign market for a while and serves as an example to the medical and hospital sector.

  5. #40
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    São Paulo, January 25, 2008 – The government of Brazil is going to create the position of agricultural attaché at its diplomatic representations abroad, with the objective of aiding ambassadors in questions involving the agricultural sector. The measure was announced yesterday, in São Paulo, by the Agribusiness Foreign Relations secretary at the Ministry of Agriculture, Célio Porto, during a meeting with private sector representatives to discuss the foreign market priorities for 2008.

    This employee will aid in the negotiations with foreign governments supplying the embassies with technical information, which will grant greater agility to processes and will expand the negotiation capacity of diplomats, especially with regard to the sanitary and phytosanitary areas and also in removal of non-tariff barriers. In the case of sanitary problems being suspected, for example, the embassy will be able to provide information about the true situation faster, avoiding an eventual block of imports or removing a ban more rapidly.

    According to Porto, in formal meetings with representatives of foreign governments, the diplomats will still be responsible for the negotiation, but nothing bars direct meetings between the attaché and the technical personnel. "They will be allocated to diplomatic representations in countries considered strategic," said the secretary.

    Porto stated that these countries have not yet been defined, but initially eight embassies should have these professionals, and they will probably be in Europe and Asia. The decree creating the position, signed by the ministries of Agriculture, Planning and Foreign Relations, should be published after Carnival (in early February). There should then be a process for selection of the employees and, after approval, they will undergo a training course at Rio Branco Institute, the Brazilian diplomatic academy.

    The need for a more technical approach to negotiations was one of the priorities raised yesterday by private-sector representatives during the seminar in São Paulo. Another point discussed was the possibility of expanding the number of visits by Brazilian authorities in the field to importer countries, even when there are no problems to be solved. "The idea is to be more proactive, and also to visit when things are good, not only when there are problems," said Porto.

    In this respect, the executive director at the Brazilian Beef Industry and Exporters Association (Abiec), Antonio Jorge Camardelli, pointed out the importance of the presence of public sector representatives, together with the private initiative, in the opening of new markets. "The government's presence helps unbar negotiations. In Algeria, for example the result was brutal. In Dubai we had a 100% increase in exports and from there we also sold to Iraq," he said.

    The businessmen also want the country to be more aggressive in the knocking down of trade barriers placed by other countries, using the bargaining weight it has. One of the most mentioned examples was that of Chile, which imposed barriers to the import of Brazilian beef, without, in the sector's evaluation, any justification. In the mean time, Brazil still imports large volumes of agribusiness products from the country, including fruit and salmon.

    In the trade area, the director of the Trade Affairs Department at the Secretariat, Benedito Rosa, crossed figures that show the markets Brazil must prioritise. The calculation included factors like the growth of the GDP of the import country, its import needs and tariff and non-tariff barriers. In the list of 20 nations with the greatest import potential, called the "fillet" by Rosa, are Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

    "These countries are good markets because they are incapable of producing for their own consumption and, with the growth of their economies, their populations are going to buy more and more food. We must arrive first," he stated, referring to the Arabs and other emerging nations.

    According to Porto, the suggestions raised will be used to build a strategic sector program for the foreign market in 2008. Apart from him and Rosa, figures were also presented by the director of the Sanitary and Phytosanitary Negotiations Department, Luiz Carlos de Oliveira, and by the director of the Trade Promotion Department, Eduardo Sampaio Marques. From the private initiative, there were representatives of the cattle beef, pork, dairy, jelly and other sectors. In the afternoon there was another similar seminar for representatives of the sectors of products of plant origin.

  6. #41
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    São Paulo, January 27, 2008 – The Brazilian government is betting on the promotion of official visits and trade events in the Arab world to increase agribusiness exports to the region even further this year. "The Middle East is the regional bloc to which our exports grew the most, and we detected the need for closer relations," the secretary of Foreign Relations in Agribusiness at the Ministry of Agriculture, Célio Porto, said in an interview to ANBA.

    In addition to the participation at Gulfood, a trade fair for the food sector to be held in Dubai, where the ministry will have a stand in partnership with the Arab Brazilian Chamber of Commerce, the secretary wants to go to Saudi Arabia in late February. These should be the first actions in a series that should involve a visit by the minister of Agriculture, Reinhold Stephanes, to the region in the first half of the year. Furthermore, the Brazilian president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva should return to the Middle East, in the second half.

    According to Porto, Lula should travel to Saudi Arabia, Lebanon and Iran, which is not an Arab country. This will be the president's third trip to the region since the beginning of his term in office. The first trip took place in December 2003. The presidential trip, however, will not be aimed solely at discussing issues pertaining to the agricultural sector, but also to several items in the bilateral agenda maintained by the two regions. On the other hand, Stephanes, who will deal with agribusiness only, should visit Saudi Arabia, Iran, Algeria and Egypt.

    Agribusiness answers to 66% of Brazilian exports to the Arab world. Shipments of the sector to the region totalled US$ 4.6 billion last year. Still, sales are still very much focussed on products such as bovine meat, chicken and sugar, all of which combined account for approximately 80% of total sales.

    The goals in actions such as the Gulfood include encouraging expansion of sales of other goods, such as dairy products, fruits and coffee. The majority of the companies that will showcase their products at the ministry's and the Arab Brazilian Chamber's stand belong in those three segments. Below are the main stretches of the interview with Célio Porto:

    ANBAWhy has the ministry decided to promote these actions in the Arab world?

    Célio Porto – The Middle East is the regional bloc to where our exports grew the most, and we detected the need for closer relations with them.

    Why did you choose the Gulfood, in Dubai?

    We spoke with the private sector, to the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and the Brazilian foreign office (Itamaraty), and it became clear that the United Arab Emirates are a reference, and that the fair is a meeting point for the sector.

    What other activities should count on the ministry's participation this year?

    The president of the Republic should travel to the region this year. According to the preliminary schedule, he should go to at least three countries: Saudi Arabia, Iran and Lebanon. The minister of Agriculture should visit countries that are in our list of priorities, such as Saudi Arabia and Iran, and will also head to Egypt and Algeria.

    The agribusiness export basket to the region is very much centered around a few products. What other goods can be promoted?

    Dairy products, fruits and coffee. Some of the commodities for which Brazil is a large exporter, such as soy and maize, are not widely consumed in the region.

    Will you attend Gulfood?

    I will head to Dubai, where our intentions will be economic and institutional. Then I will travel to Saudi Arabia, but it will be strictly an institutional mission.

  7. #42
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    São Paulo, February 13, 2008 -- Importers from eight Arab companies are going to participate today in the International Business Meeting promoted by the Brazilian High-End Furniture Manufacturers Association (Abimad), in São Paulo. The event precedes the Abimad Fair, to take place between February 14 and 17 at the Imigrantes Exhibition Centre.

    According to Rafael Molon, the organiser of the event and also the person in charge of the foreign relations department at Abimad, most of the buyers were recommended by Abimad associates and have already participated in other sector fairs in São Paulo. Of the eight Arab companies, three are from the United Arab Emirates and the others are from Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Oman and Algeria.

    "In the last edition (of the Abimad fair), our sales expectations to the region were not reached, and for this edition we have invited buyers who already know Brazilian furniture and who should place larger orders," stated Molon.

    One of the companies from Dubai that already buys from Brazilian companies is Western Furniture, which is coming to the Abimad Fair for the third time. The second company from Dubai that is going to participate in the event is Al Shakora Trading, which participated in the International Trade Fair for Furniture Exports and Sales (Fenavem) last year and the third company is UMG Dubai, which is coming for the first time. "Of the group of Arab companies, those from the Emirates are our main buyers," said Molon.

    According to him, one of the reasons for this concentration of companies from the country in the Gulf is that, apart from the Emirates currently being living a construction sector boom, Abimad companies generally participate in the Index, the largest furniture and decoration fair in the Middle East, which takes place in Dubai. "Some Brazilian companies are already known in the country," he added.

    For today's business meetings a total of 59 buyers from 30 countries have been invited to meet with 39 Brazilian companies. According to Molon, the national companies chosen are part of the Abimad export program, Quality for Export, and of the Brazilian Furniture, by the Brazilian Export and Investment Promotion Agency (Apex-Brasil) and the Brazilian Furniture Industry Association (Abimovel).

    According to figures supplied by the Arab Brazilian Chamber of Commerce, Brazilian exports of furniture and decoration objects to the Arab countries totalled around US$ 10 million last year.

    The Abimad Fair is at its 5th edition and is going to count on the participation of 164 exhibitors from all of Brazil. There are about 50,000 square metres of exhibition area to house the most recent novelties in modern and contemporary furniture for external and internal environments, residential and household and accessories for interior decorating. Over 10,000 visitors are expected at the event.

    Abimad Fair
    Date: February 14 to 17
    Local: Imigrantes Exhibition Centre
    Address: Rodovia dos Imigrantes, Km 1,5
    Time: From 10:00 am to 07:00 pm

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