+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... LastLast
Results 29 to 35 of 66
  1. #29
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Ali Idir :


    Vendredi 30 Janvier 2009 -- Les groupes chinois continuent de décrocher des marchés dans le secteur des travaux publics en Algérie. La direction des travaux publics (DTP) de la wilaya de Tipaza a annoncé jeudi avoir confié à la société nationale de construction de chine CSCEC la réalisation d'une autoroute de 48 km entre Bou Smail et Cherchell pour un montant de près de 19 milliards de dinars (190 millions d'euros).

    Le groupe chinois, qui s'est engagé à livrer le projet dans un délai de 28 mois a remporté, le marché en présentant l'offre la moins chère, selon la DTP de Tipaza. Le groupe CSCEC a décroché d'importants contrats dans le bâtiment en Algérie, notamment avec l'Agence d'amélioration et de développement du logement (AADL).

  2. #30
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Eileen Byrne:


    Algiers, March 11, 2009 -- Four Chinese telecoms engineers - three men and a woman - sip orange juice in a café on an Algiers square, opposite a statue of Emir Abdelkader, the 19th-century nationalist leader.

    Three are children of farmers back in China, but the most senior, 25-year-old Yuan Hua, is son of an engineer. Slightly homesick, they say the locals are welcoming but they wish public transport was more user-friendly for visitors with little Arabic or French.

    Employed by Shenzhen-based Huawei Technologies, they are developing mobile phone networks both for the former state monopoly, Algerie Telecom, and its private-sector rival, Djezzy, owned by Egypt's Orascom. They are glad for the work, even if expatriate salaries are not as good as they once were.

    As China seeks to expand its presence in Africa, it is looking north to Algeria, with which it has historic ties of friendship. China was the first non-Arab country to recognise Algeria's nationalist government in exile in the late 1950s. There are now about 30,000 Chinese nationals living in the north African country, according to the embassy in Algiers.

    The bulk are employed by Chinese engineering, construction and other infrastructure companies, mainly state-owned. Their client is more often than not the Algerian state. President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, who at 72 still enjoys the backing of the military elite, is seeking re-election for a third term on April 9.

    He has been in a hurry to use the proceeds from oil and gas exports to modernise the country's infrastructure, aiming to spend about $200bn (€157bn, £144bn) on such projects by the end of 2009, and has turned to Chineseknowhow to get things done fast.

    "In certain fields, Algeria very much resembles China in the 1980s and 1990s," when infrastructure had to be modernised to attract foreign investors, explains Jinhui Peng, China's commercial attaché in Algiers. "They are following almost the same route to development."

    The largest infrastructure contract, a $5.67bn deal to build a 525km stretch of a east-west highway, went to a joint venture between China's state-owned CITIC Group and CRCC, formerly part of Chinese state railways. An impressive new foreign ministry in Algiers is being built by China State Construction Engineering Corporation, which houses its imported workers in a cavernous dormitory building just across the road.

    Algerian officials believe that, with its strong foreign reserves, the country can maintain the pace of development even if oil falls as low as $20 a barrel.

    Projects include water supply works, airport terminals, university facilities and upgrades to the power infrastructure, with a strong emphasis on housing.

    Close to the main square in Oran, the second city, families live in squalor in decrepit blocks of flats dating from before independence in 1962. The shanty-town population was swelled by violence between Islamist groups and the army in the 1990s, which sent villagers scrambling for safety in the towns. Now, however, Oran is ringed by new tower blocks and university buildings, many Chinese built.

    As the oil price rose, Algeria was a rich source of jobs for construction workers from China, along with engineers, managers, interpreters - even canteen cooks.

    The main opposition parties are boycotting next month's poll, claiming that it will be far from an exercise in democracy. But it can do Mr Bouteflika no harm to point to the progress under his period in office, even as a rump of Islamist fighters continue to hold out in the hills. Many Algerians, battered by the vicious violence of the 1990s, appreciate better housing, water and electricity supplies and college places for their children.

    However, the press has noted the paradox of importing Chinese workers when unemployment remains high. Officials from both countries emphasise the numbers of locals employed and training opportunities offered, but a local skills shortage remains.

    In Oran, 30-year-old Khalid's complaint is typical: "They pay the Chinese well, and us nothing. If they paid us like they pay them, we would work better." He and his friendswork in odd jobs in the informal economy, as they dream of emigration.

    The pay differential is confirmed at a building site operated by Zhongding International Engineering Company, which completed a $53m upgrade to Oran's sewerage system in November.

    Algerian workers lack skills, a ZIEC employee says on condition of anonymity. And besides, he adds, wage expectations in China are higher. ZIEC employs a few Algerian welders, steel drivers or carpenters at 680 dinars (£6.60) a day.

    Its Chinese blue-collar workers, housed in sparse breeze-block rooms, are better paid but have no holidays during their two-year contract, just "one or two" days off a month, he says.

    As for direct investment, Chinese companies have, along with other foreign companies, been given pause by recent tax changes and a ban since last summer on holding majority stakes in Algerian companies.

  3. #31
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Mardi 31 Mars 2009 -- L’invasion de l’économie Chinoise provoquent une certaine inquiétude dans les milieux officiels Européens, et ce selon les rapports publiés par la commission Européenne et l’Union Européenne, après l’expansion du secteur du développement rapide Chinois vers en Afrique du Nord, qui était dans un passé récent dans la zone de l’invasion Européenne. Pékin a tracé un programme économique pour le prochain quinquennat, parallèlement avec la réservation d’un fond d’investissement spécial d’une valeur de 1 milliards de dollars. L’investissement Chinois en Afrique du Nord est diversifié entre plusieurs secteurs, le bâtiment, les travaux publics et le foncier en sont les plus importants. L’exportation Chinoises vers l’Algérie a connu une augmentation rapide et considérable, puisque Pékin est devenu le premier fournisseur commercial de l’Egypte avec 5. 810 milliards de dollars, et le troisième exportateur vers l’Algérie avec une valeur de 3. 987 milliards de dollars, après la France et l’Italie avec, respectivement, 6. 465 milliards de dollars et 4. 342 milliards de dollars. Les exportations Chinoise vers l’Algérie ont augmenté avec un taux de 82,66 %, comparées à l’année 2007, et représente plus de 10.18 % importations Algériennes de l’Etranger. On constate que le nombre de sociétés Chinoises a multiplié pour atteindre en fin 2008 à plus de 578 entreprises et sociétés Chinoises opérant en Algérie, alors que la Chine apparaît comme étant le troisième fournisseur pour l’Algérie depuis l’année avec 1.708 milliards de dollars, puis en 2007 avec 2.116 milliards de dollars.

  4. #32
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Safia Berkouk :


    Mercredi 20 Mai 2009 -- Des micro-ordinateurs portables à seulement 18 000 dinars devraient être commercialisés en Algérie par Eepad à partir de septembre prochain, et ce à la faveur d’un protocole d’accord de partenariat que l’entreprise privée a conclu hier avec un leader chinois dans le domaine de l’électronique et de l’informatique, China Great Wall Computer Shenzhen (CGWC). En vertu de cet accord, les deux partenaires créent une joint-venture qui se chargera de fabriquer en Algérie des cartes mémoires pour les PC portables actuellement assemblés par Epead. Le président-directeur général de cette entreprise, M. Nouar Harzallah, a indiqué lors de la conférence de presse qu’il a animée à Alger, à l’issue de la signature, qu’il s’agit d’»une opération de délocalisation complète de l’usine et des machines de fabrication du partenaire chinois». Cette opération va permettre à l’Eepad de «gagner du temps et de réduire les coûts, notamment de transport», pour arriver à vendre un laptop à un prix réduit, en précisant que le groupe asiatique «a porté son choix stratégique sur l’Algérie après des mois de réflexion». Cet accord va désormais «faire bénéficier l’Eepad du transfert technologique» et créera «des perspectives plus larges pour le développement de la coopération scientifique, stratégique et technique entre les deux pays», a déclaré le P-DG de CGWC, M. Zhou Gengshen.

    Selon M. Harzallah, la société mixte qui a été créée sera détenue majoritairement par l’Eepad et dotée d’un capital de 4 millions de dollars. Il est prévu qu’elle investisse 20 millions de dollars pour le lancement du projet qui portera sur la réalisation de trois unités de fabrication de cartes mémoires à Bouira, Blida et Annaba. L’investissement sera réalisé à travers «un montage financier étranger», a précisé M. Harzallah, en ajoutant que l’Eepad sera chargée de «l’intégration et de la commercialisation» avec la création prévue de quelque «3 000 emplois». Il est prévu que la fabrication des cartes mémoires débute en septembre de cette année avec une capacité de 200 000 unités la première année et d’un million à partir de la deuxième année. Le P-DG de l’Eepad a assuré que «la maintenance sera également disponible localement» et que «le développement du contenu fera partie du partenariat car la compagnie chinoise est également spécialisée dans le développement des logiciels». M. Harzallah a souligné dans ce cadre qu’il y aura «beaucoup de formation pour les techniciens algériens», évoquant même la possibilité de «créer un centre de recherche en Algérie». Le conférencier a en outre précisé que la priorité sera de fabriquer pour le marché local avec des ambitions «d’exporter au niveau régional et international», d’autant que l’entreprise chinoise exporte déjà en Europe, aux Etats-Unis et vers des pays arabes.

    Présent à la cérémonie de signature, l’ambassadeur de Chine en Algérie a estimé que l’accord signé constitue «un nouveau pas important vers le développement de l’investissement et le transfert technologique entre les deux pays et une nouvelle impulsion à la coopération stratégique bilatérale». Toutefois, a-t-il ajouté, «il ne faut pas s’en contenter. Nous devons faire plus et mieux». Fondée en 1987, China Great Wall Computer Shenzhen est une filiale du groupe étatique China Electronics Corporation Group. Elle est présente sur les marchés des cinq continents avec des ventes annuelles de plus de 100 000 millions de dollars.

  5. #33
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    Mercredi 20 Mai 2009 -- L’opérateur de services sur internet, Eepad et le holding chinois China Great Computer Shenzhen ont procédé, hier à Alger, à la signature d’un protocole d’accord de partenariat pour la fabrication des cartes mères pour microportables, Lap Top, et des accessoires en Algérie. Selon Nouar Harzallah, PDG de l’Eepad, l’accord prévoit la création d’une société en joint-venture entre les deux entreprises, dont le capital estimé à 4 millions de dollars revient majoritairement à l’Eepad. Cette joint-venture a nécessité un investissement de 20 millions de dollars et débouchera, concrètement, sur la réalisation de quatre unités de production qui seront implantées à Rouiba (Alger), Blida et Annaba où l’Eepad possède déjà une usine de montage de micro-ordinateurs portables. Dès septembre prochain, les trois unités seront opérationnelles et produiront, pour un premier temps, 200 000 cartes mères. Après la première année, la capacité de production passera à 1 million d’unités, affirme Nouar Harzallah. Et d’ajouter que la priorité sera donnée au marché local, sans pour autant délaisser le marché international, où l’entreprise compte placer ses produits à travers les pays voisins du Maghreb et de l’Afrique. Notons que la société China Great Computer Shenzhen est l’un des plus grands constructeurs et distributeurs chinois de produits informatiques.

  6. #34
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    May 21, 2009 -- Algerian company EEPAD and Chinese China Great Wall Computer Shenzhen on Tuesday in Algiers signed a joint-venture for the production of accessories and motherboards for laptops, Echourouk reported on Wednesday (May 20th). Some 3,000 jobs will be created at three new manufacturing facilities to be built in Blida, Rouiba, and Annaba.

  7. #35
    Guest 123 is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    0

    BEIJING, May 25, 2009 (Xinhua) -- China Great Wall Computer Shenzhen Co. Ltd. announced May 24 its cooperation with Algerian broadband network operator EEPAD for establishing a joint venture in Algeria requiring 4 million U.S. dollars. Great Wall Computer contributed 1.2 million dollars, accounting for about 30 percent of the total equities. Besides, the domestic computer manufacturer's procurement application for a 99 percent stake in China Great Wall Computer (Hong Kong) Ltd. was approved by the Ministry of Commerce on May 22.

    As a result, Great Wall Computer will control 26.58 percent of the shares in Taiwan-based Envision Monitors, a display manufacturing giant, indirectly, vs. the 27.25 percent equity held by the latter's largest shareholder Koninklijke Philips Electronics. The computer maker aims to strengthen its computer business and accelerate the exploitation of overseas markets by grabbing the market opportunity of netbook, a small portable laptop computer designed for wireless communication and access to the Internet.

    The joint venture plans to produce 100,000 units of netbooks in the first year, and 200,000 units in the second year. Its annual production capacity will eventually reach 500,000 units. Zhou Gengshen, president of Great Wall Computer, expects a 50 percent growth in the company's computer set business this year, and hopes for the company to rank among China's top three homemade PC makers and become No. 1 PC exporter in the country.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 5 of 10 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts