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Articles about Algeria from 18th-19th century

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  • Articles about Algeria from 18th-19th century

    The York Chronicle; And Weekly Advertiser Oct 31st,1772

    Algiers, Oct. 31. The Winchelsea English frigate, Capt. Wilkinson, which sailed from hence the 27th of September, returned the 17th inst. The English gave it out that she had only been to Marseilles to put some dispatches into the post for London, relative to the differences between the commander and this regency, which the Algerines affected to take no notice of. After the usual salutations, the Dey signified to the commandant that he was at liberty to have an audience whenever he pleased, provided he did not bring with him the consul, whom he was determined not to see again, for reasons which he had given his Britannick Majesty. The commandant made answer, that as the consul was an officer appointed by his Majesty, he could not dispense with introducing him, and rather than not bring him, he would have no audience himself. The Dey persisting in his resolution, Capt. Wilkinson was equally determined, and went away again without an audience. During the time that the English frigate was here, all the Christian slaves were chained, for fear they should recover their liberty, and go on board her.
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  • #2
    The Dublin Evening Post, 1736

    "They write from Copenhagen, that a Man of War and two Frigats, were ordered to be fitted out for some private Expedition. The Master at a Swedish Vessel arrived in that Port from Spain, reports, that he met in those Seas an Algerine Rover, and that being forced to go on beard and shew his Pass, he saw the Crew of a Ship from Lubec, which those Rovers were carrying into Slavery to Algiers."
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    • #3
      The National Journal: Or, Country Gazette, 1746
      "The Algerines have taken a Ship from Holland bound for the Streights, and carried her into Algiers."

      Hambourgh, May 5. 1746
      " The College of Admiralty of this City are equipping a Man of War, to cruize in the Mediterranean upon the Algerine Pirates, who do great Mischief to our Commerce: M. Joachim Brokes, who served many Years in England with good Reputation,
      is to have the Command of her."
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      • #4
        The Universal Spy: Or, the Royal Oak Journal Reviv'd - 1732

        Paris, August 15. It is reported here, that the Dey of Algiers has caused the Governor of Oran to be put to Death, and some other principal Officers, for Cowardice inabandoning the Town, and has sent a considerable Army to attack the Spaniards.
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        • #5
          Royal Gazette, 1793
          April 3. The Dey of Algiers has lately conducted himself with some sort of honour in a question about property. A Corsair having secretly seized eight Dutch vessels before the expiration of the thirty days after which his war is to commence against Holland, the Dey has directed them to be restored, and has enforced this order, notwithstanding some tumults, which were provoked upon the occasion by the Vikil Hadgi, his brother-in law. This latter, the sworn enemy of all Christian nations, is now banished, and his office is conferred upon a nephew, of a better character.
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          Last edited by mohovitch; 21st September 2009, 13:47.

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          • #6
            Spirit of the Public Journals, 1797

            PRETTY AMUSEMENTS FOR CROWNED HEADS, FOR A CENTURY TO COME*.
            "WHEN the combined forces have reinstated the monarchy of France, seen the Monk restored to his monastery, and the Nun to her cloister; brought back the feudal system to the most absolute vassalage, and introduced wooden shoes and wretchedness to more than twenty millions of people, they may direct their attention to the Dey of Algiers, and insist upon introducing the Protestant religion into every corner of his black dominions. That point once accomplished, they may sail to Constantinople, and compel the Grand Turk to throw away his turban, and wear in the room a cocked hat and a pig-tailed periwig: this will be very easily performed; and then they will have nothing to do, but to pay a visit to the Emperor of China, and advise him kindly, at the point of the bayonet, to embrace Judaism for the good of his immortal soul, and to oblige his subjects to rise with their b—ks-des foremost. After that, they may step over the Chinese wall; force the Khan of Persia to keep Lent; and then, turning their attention to the Great Mogul, insist upon qualifying all his subjects for the Italian Opera, and that they ride with their heads to their horses' tails. They will then have plenty of leisure upon their hands to pare the lips and pinch the noses of the Tartars into a decent and becoming form. As to the Hottentots, it will take no trouble at all to make them wear ruffled shirts and silk Stockings; and nothing can be more pleasant to the blacks of Guinea, than compelling them to dress in furr cloaks, with black silk bags to their hair. Afterwards they can force the Esquimaux Indians to study the Newtonian system, and oblige the Laplanders to have light all the year round.—Chronicle."

            *: This whimsical plan of operations appeared very shortly after
            we free Englishmen joined the grand confederacy, with a view of
            forcing the French to abandon the dreadful, though voluntary,
            slavery of a representative and republican Government, and to re-
            turn to the rational liberty they formerly enjoyed under their
            Grand Monarque. The rogues "dared kill a king," and were
            insolent enough to think they could live without one!
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            • #7
              Britannic Magazine; or, Entertaining Repository of Heroic Adventures and Memorable Exploits, 1796

              "IN the year 1541, the Emperor Charles V. with an army of 30,000 men, and a vast fleet, formed the siege of Algiers, which was defended by only eight hundred Turks and about six thousand Moors who had no firearms.—Charles, resolving upon a general assault, kept a constant firing upon the town; which, from the weak defence made by the garrison, he looked upon as already in his hands. But while the douwan, or Algerine senate, were deliberating on the most proper means of obtaining an honourable capitulation, a mad prophet, attended by a multitude of people, entered the assembly, and foretold the speedy destruction of the Spaniards before the end of the moon, exhorting the inhabitants to hold out till that time. This prediction was soon accomplished in a very surprising and unexpected manner: for, on the 28th of October, 1541, a dreadful storm of wind, rain, and hail, arose from the north, accompanied with violent shocks of earthquakes, and a dismal and universal darkness both by sea and land; so that the sun, moon, and elements, seemed to combine together for the destruction of the Spaniards. In that one night, some say in less than half an hour, eighty-six ships and fifteen galleys were destroyed, with all their crews and military stores; by which the army on shore was deprived of all means of subsisting in these parts. Their camp also, which spread itself along the plain under the fort, was laid quite under water by the torrents which descended from the neighbouring hills. Many of the troops, by trying to remove into a better situation, were cut in pieces by the Moors and Arabs; while several galleys, and other vessels, endeavouring to gain some neighbouring creeks along the coasts, were immediately plundered, and their crews massacred by the inhabitants. The next morning Charles beheld the sea covered with the fragments of so many ships, and the bodies of men, horses, and cattle, swimming on the waves; at which he was so disheartened, that, abandoning his tents, artillery, and all his heavy baggage, to the enemy, he marched at the head of his army, though in no small disorder, towards Cape Malabux, in order to re-embark in those few vesels which had outweathered the storm. But Hassan, who had caused his motions to be watched, allowed him just time to get to the shore, when he sallied out and attacked the Spaniards in the midst of their hurry and confusion to get into their ships, killing great numbers, and bringing away a still greater number of captives; after which he returned in triumph to Algiers, where he celebrated with great rejoicings his happy deliverance from such distress and danger.The unhappy Spaniards had scarcely reached their ships, when they were attacked by a fresh storm, in which several more of them perished; one ship in particular, containing 700 soldiers, besides sailors, sunk in the emperor’s fight, without a possibility of saving a single man. At length, with much labour, they reached the port of Bujeyah, at that time possessed by the Spaniards. Here the emperor dismissed the few remains of the Maltese knights and their forces, who embarked in three shattered galleys, and with much difficulty and danger reached their own country. Charles himself staid no longer than till the 16th of November, when he set sail for Carthagena, and reached it on the 25th of the same month, severely instructed in the vanity of human greatness. In this unfortunate expedition upwards of 120 ships and galleys were lost, 300 colonels and other land and sea officers, 8000 soldiers and marines, besides those destroyed by the enemy on the re-embarkation, ordrowned in the last storm. The number of prisoners was so great, that the Algerines sold some of them, by way of contempt, for an onion per head. MEMOIRS"
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              • #8
                Hircarrah - 1794
                Extract of a Letter from Madeira, Nov. 13.
                "His Excellency the Governor, here, has received official intelligence, that on the 18th Sept. a peace was concluded between Her Faithful Majesty, of Portugal, and the Dey of Algiers.—The Portuguese squadron, which has so long blocked up the Algerines, in the Mediterranean, is in consequence withdrawn, and they begin to infest the teas in great numbers—By the latest accounts from L[ILL], we [ILL], that during the last three weeks, not fewer than 20 American vessels have been captured by them.—The Algerines have always been at war with America, but the Portuguese sqadron has to completely kept them in check, that their depredations have been but little felt, either by the subjects of Portugal, or those of America. It will, however, be very different now, at least until Congress can sent a naval force into the Mediterranean, sufficient to keep them within the Streights. The peace was signed at Algiers, by the British consul, on the part of Portugal."
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                • #9
                  Britannic Magazine; or, Entertaining Repository of Heroic Adventures and Memorable Exploits, 1802

                  "If our last letters from Algiers may be relied upon, the Dey is preparing to declare war against all Europe. It is principally with Spain, England, and France, that he means to enter the lifts. The capture of the Portuguese frigate, which was carried by boarding, and of which 312 men were thrown into prison, has inflated every one. The Head of the Regency, already disposed to think himself the most powerful prince on earth, no longer fixes any limits to his insolence: “God,” said he, “has placed me on the throne of Algiers, to avenge the true believers upon the infidels. I have men and arms; and, if I am attacked by the mighty, God will assist me.”
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                  • #10
                    Britannic Magazine; or, Entertaining Repository of Heroic Adventures and Memorable Exploits, 1802

                    "ALGIERS, April 25.—On the 21st, an officer of the regency, accompanied by guards, presented himself at the house of Mr. Falcon, the English consul, and summoned him to open one of the lower apartments of his house. Two of the domestics fled, and, as the key was missing, the guards broke open the door, and found two Turkish women. The English consul declared that they could have been introduced only by his domestics. The house was immediately surrounded by a great mob, and Mr. Falcon was exposed to the greatest danger. The women, being conveyed to the regency, were at first condemned to be drowned, but received each 500 blows with a stick. One of the domestic slaves having made a consession at the Marine-office, which criminated the English consul and his secretary, the Dey caused to be signified to them that they must quit Algiers in three days. The prince remained all night at the Marine-office, to inspect the reparation of the vessel destined for their embarkation. On the 22d, the consul represented to the regency, that, being sent to Algiers by his sovereign, he could not leave it but by his orders. The Dey, without giving him time to communicate with any one, caused him to be immediately seized by six tchaoux, who conveyed him on-board at noon, and the vessel immediately sailed."
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                    • #11
                      Nova Scotia Packet; and General Advertiser - 1786

                      HALIFAX, June 1. " A large body of American prisoners, now in slavery at Algiers, have petitioned our Consul there, to represent their miserable situation to the Court of Great-Britain, in order to obtain relief from the state of slavery and hunger which they are reduced to by the Dey, whom they emphatically stile the King of Cruelties."
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                      • #12
                        Nova Scotia Packet; and General Advertiser - 1786

                        Extract of a letter from Malaga, March 16.
                        " The American brig Jupiter, Captain Watson, is arrived here with an Algerine galley of 12 guns, which had attacked her, but was at last herself taken. An account of this matter is sent to Madrid, as the permitting any vessels to bring in prizes, might, it is feared, revive the dispute with the Dey of Algiers, which there is reason to hope is fully accommodated."
                        "April 16. The American ships which trade up the Mediterranean, or to any of the Spanish ports, are most of them armed, and carry from ten to twenty guns each, to defend them against the Barbary corsairs. For their future security,they will also sail two or three together.
                        "An American armed vessel having taken an Algerine corsair, with a number of Moors on board, will probably be the means of either a truce or cartel being settled between those powers, by which a number of unhappy people, who have been confined at Algiers for some time past, will be released from slavery."
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                        • #13
                          Nova Scotia Packet; and General Advertiser - 1786

                          "The ransom-money demanded by the Dey of Algiers for his American slaves, is 600l. for a master of a vessel, 400l. for a mate, and 200l. for each common man! The mate of Captain Stephens's vessel, lately captured and taken into Algiers, officiates as a cook in one of the kitchens of the Royal Palace of the Dey. His head cook is a Spaniard, who has several under him, all slaves, but who have a very good birth. Stephens's mate got his situation by the very generous influence of Mr. Logie."
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                          • #14
                            The London Packet; Or, New Lloyd's Evening Post - 1785

                            "Extract of a letter from Gibraltar, July. 21. An armistice has taken place between Spain and Algiers. There are many Algerine corsairs cruizing between Cape Spartel and St. Vincent's, which had captured several Portuguese vessels."
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                            • #15
                              Daily Advertiser 1790

                              FRANCE. NATIONAL ASSEMBLY. SATURDAY, July 3.
                              THE following letter from the Minister of the Marine to the President was read. "SIR, "I am ordered by the King to make the Assembly acquainted with disorders of a new kind that merit all its attention. These disorders have been committed upon the coasts of the Mediterranean by Frenchmen and soreigners, and may prove of the greatest detriment to the whole kingdom. The laws, the most sacred among civilized nations have been transgressed. Some Neapolitan fishermen,who came to fish upon the coast near Martiques have been driven away, and even ill treated. They complained to the Court of Admiralty of that place, but it was too weak to do them justice. The Captain of a Neapolitan pink, incensed at this conduct, seized the nets of a French fisherman by way of reprisal, and thereby ruined a whole family."The other events are still more interesting to the Commonweal, as they may occasion a rupture with the Barbary States, being a formal violation of the treaty concluded with the Regency of Algiers. This power is at war with the Court of Sicily and the Republic of Genoa. The Algerine corsairs had taken two prizes, and conducted them to the territory of France. One has been retaken by the Genoese, though at anchor upon French ground, near Sciotat: The other was at the great road at Toulon,
                              when the boats of the Neapolitan ships, assisted by some French people, found means to carry it off. "The people at Aiguemortes have thrown stones at a Barbary vessel. These outrages may irritate the Regency of Algiers, and it is much to be feared that they may give orders to attack our commerce. The merchants of Marseilles have written to
                              me on the subject, and I think it would be adviseable for the Assembly to take the affair into consideration."
                              SUNDAY, July 4. The Assembly voted an address of thanks to his Majesty for the measures to be taken to punish the authors of the disorders committed on the coast, and to accelerate the reparation due to the Courts of Naples and Algiers."
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