Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Fiqh notes- Maaliki

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fiqh notes- Maaliki

    Salaam,

    I just wanted to open a thread that could be used as a reference point for anyone who so wishes. Maybe we could compile some notes on basic Maliki Fiqh, covering the basic topics first, such as Purity (water, wudhu, ghusl, tayammum etc), and then Prayer.

    If anyone has any useful sources of information feel free to share them with the rest of us.

    Baraka Allahu Feekoum
    -When the world pushes you to your knees, you are in the perfect position to pray.

  • #2
    The following are two excellent web resources for maliki fiqh:

    http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/ABewley/

    http://lamppostproductions.org/maliki_fiqh_corner.shtml
    -When the world pushes you to your knees, you are in the perfect position to pray.

    Comment


    • #3
      The Risala

      of 'Abdullah ibn Abi Zayd al-Qayrawani

      (310/922 - 386/996)

      A Treatise on Maliki Fiqh

      (Including commentary from ath-Thamr ad-Dani by al-Azhari)

      Abu Muhammad ÔAbdullah, a Maliki faqih known as "Shaykh al-Faqih" and "little Malik". He was the head of the Maliki school in Qayrawan. He wrote ar-Risala and an-Nawadir and several other books.

      http://www.islamic.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/risala.htm

      Comment


      • #4
        A friend of mine who is an Alawi and an extremely intelligent and pious person advised the following site for the Maliki Fiqh

        Its a popular one I know but thought ide post it anyway.

        http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homep.../HomePage.html

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by lamise

          Sorry didnt see that you already posted it, my bad

          The lamposts one you posted is an excellent one as well.

          Comment


          • #6
            The posting on the Aisha site of the following: The Hikam of Ibn 'Ata'llah is excellent, I really enjoyed reading the whole thing. Ibn Ata'llah was certainly a most blessed of scholars.

            Comment


            • #7
              I just started learning these things a year ago with a blessed teacher, so I'm still a novice but my thirst for knowledge has well and truly started alhamdu'lillah.

              I was given a printout with some of the Hikam of Ibn Ata'llah by a colleague at university and found them to be really inspirational. I've been looking for a copy of the complete works for such a long time. Just out of curiosity, was Ibn Atallah a maliki scholar?

              I'm teaching a new revert friend of mine to pray and she is finding it hard to memorise the tashahhud. Is it ok if she recites some other adhkar whilst she is learning it?
              -When the world pushes you to your knees, you are in the perfect position to pray.

              Comment


              • #8
                Shaykh Taj-ud-Din Ahmad Ibn Ata'illah

                Shaykh Taj-ud-Din Ahmad Ibn Ata'illah was born in about 1250 into a distinguished family of religious scholars who followed the school of Imam Malik in Alexandria. His father was a close follower of Shaykh Abu'l Hasn ash-Shadhili. Ahmad ibn Ata'illah became the close follower of Shaykh Abu'l-Abbas al-Mursi after he had completed his study of Islamic Law as transmitted by the school of Imam Malik. Shaykh Abu'l-Abbas al-Mursi predicted that Ahmad ibn Ata'illah would become an authority on both the Sufi path and Islamic Law, and it was in Cairo that this prediction of future greatness came true, for there he led two lives. One was his professional life as a teacher of Islamic Law in accordance with what had been transmitted through Imam Malik in various public institutions and mosques in Cairo, such as Al-Azhar and the newly built Al-Mansuriyyah, together with his public preaching which attracted large audiences; his other life was devoted to his duties as a spiritual master of the Shadhili Order, in which he transmitted the transformative teaching of the Muhammadi code to sincere seekers of wisdom and gnosis. Shaykh Ahmad Ibn Ata'illah was also influential in the Mamluk court, and used to counsel Sultan al-Mansur (d. 1298) on religious matters.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Why Maaliki ? {just asking}

                  Or is there gone be several threads on all the school of thoughts ?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ibn Ata'illah aliskandari famously travelled to Alexandria from Cairo to visit Sheikh ibn Taymiyya so that he could present the true and unfabricated case of Ibn Arabi and his Wahdat al-wujud. By the Grace of Allah (swt) after hearing this this explanation Ibn Taymiyya admits that he had missunderstood the writings of Ibn Arabi on this matter or rather that he had not understood them in the same way as they were expained by Sheikh Ibn Ata illah

                    The transcribed conversation between the two Sheikhs is as follows,

                    http://www.sunnah.org/tasawwuf/scholr25.htm

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Why Maaliki ? {just asking}
                      Only because this is what I have information on, and is the school of thought most N.Africans follow.

                      Or is there gone be several threads on all the school of thoughts
                      That would be really great inshallah. Unfortunately I'm not versed on the Hanafi, Shafi'i or Hanbali schools of thought and don't really want to put information up that is unreliable or that I haven't had verified.

                      For Hanafi's and Shafi'i's

                      I am aware of one website that is excellent:http://www.sunnipath.com

                      If anyone is more knowledgeable on these schools of thought please do post up some information.

                      Allah Bless
                      -When the world pushes you to your knees, you are in the perfect position to pray.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I thought wahabi & Hannafi were the popular school of thoughts in N.A.

                        I like the scholars in SunniPath - and use them all for references.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lamise

                          I'm teaching a new revert friend of mine to pray and she is finding it hard to memorise the tashahhud. Is it ok if she recites some other adhkar whilst she is learning it?
                          Im sorry but I cant answer that I am not well versed in the Maliki fiqh, my cousins would know and if I remember I will ask them next time I phone home, Insha-Allah.

                          As far as the Hani perspective goes on this you are welcome to visit the following link,

                          http://muslim-canada.org/fiqhch13.htm

                          Dont think that fully answers your question, sorry.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by HOUDA-K
                            I thought wahabi & Hannafi were the popular school of thoughts in N.A.

                            I like the scholars in SunniPath - and use them all for references.
                            Absolutely, sunnipath is very useful mashaAllah. About N.A, I'm not too sure but I think traditionally it was dominated by the Maaliki school of thought. There has definitely been a growth in the following of the wahhabi movement. But I wasn't aware of N.Africans following Imam abu Hanifa? Allahu alam, perhaps it is a recent thing.
                            -When the world pushes you to your knees, you are in the perfect position to pray.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              There isnt a large number of Hanafis in NA but if a Maliki in my experience would change their madh'hab it would be to the Hanafi fiqh because the two are very similar and the closest of the Madhaahib.

                              Hanafis are concentrated in the Indian sub-continent, Syria and Yemen. Tradtionally the two hubs of the Hanafi fiqh are Pakistan and Syria, the late Sheikh Kuftaro of Syria was one of if not the highest Hanafi Sheikhs out there.

                              Whilst al-Azhar is tradtionally a Shafa'i institution it has many Sheiyoukh from across the madhaahib and all students studying there choose one of the Madh'habs for their fiqh classes and they are seperated and taught accordingly.

                              Comment

                              Unconfigured Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X