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Rapture Ready: The Unauthorized Christians United for Israel Tour

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  • Rapture Ready: The Unauthorized Christians United for Israel Tour

    Salams All!

    You guys... OMG!! This is a crazy video... Please share what/who these people remind you of

    Rapture Ready: The Unauthorized Christians United for Israel Tour on Vimeo

    ***************
    The Muslims are the enemy. Satan is Behind the Muslims. The Anti-Christ is the person who "forces" a peace treaty between Israel and the Arabs. "If we don't knock out Iran...". "It's [the Bible] just as true as when Moses read it as it is right now"...

    Didn't the bible come AFTER Moses?! ... This is TOOOOOO funny!

    The Jewish guys who are filming/interviewing got kicked out of the convention for no reason...




    oh yeah! Don't forget to read the comments

  • #2
    They're proper nuts alright. Albeit not as funny as the evangelicals in the Youtube I posted

    Sadly, there's a lunatic fringe in every religion - it's a bit like the lunatics who commit horrific acts supposedly in the names of Islam or Judaism.

    We've all got 'em



    V

    Comment


    • #3
      that is funny
      It seems as if one fails to conceive
      The meaning my name strives to achieve

      To a biological form you cannot relate-
      Because a reproductive cell is a gamete not gamate!

      It means to unite, -to become consolidated
      So without me in a.com, is there hope we'd be amalgamated?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by voltaire View Post
        They're proper nuts alright. Albeit not as funny as the evangelicals in the Youtube I posted

        Sadly, there's a lunatic fringe in every religion - it's a bit like the lunatics who commit horrific acts supposedly in the names of Islam or Judaism.

        We've all got 'em



        V
        What's funny is that these people are supposedly intellectuals and the words that are coming out of their mouths are just logical fallacy after logical fallacy... it's so coated in s*** that they can't tell the difference between their pie holes and their *ahem* holes... ...

        It's scary in a way ... but your right... that evangelical stuff is funnier .

        Hopefully the normal people from any group won't be grouped with those psychos.

        Comment


        • #5
          Controversy Stirs at Christians United for Israel Summit


          by: Andy Birkey

          Sun Jul 29, 2007 at 12:10:23 AM


          Christians United for Israel met with Congress members last week as part of the second annual Christians United for Israel (CUFI) Summit. Led by Pastor John Hagee, the group called on Congress to support pre-emptive military action on Iran and to oppose a two-state solution for the conflict between Israel and Palestine. Journalist Max Blumenthal brought a video camera into the summit and interviewed attendees about the motivation behind CUFI. According to CUFI members, the return of Jesus depends on the protection of Israel, and a peaceful coexistence between Israel and its neighbors is contrary to the Biblical prophecy of the Rapture. Blumenthal asked some hard questions and was escorted out of the summit.

          Mac Hammond, pastor and founder of Living Word Christian Center in Brooklyn Park, Minn., served as the Midwest regional director for CUFI and now sits on its executive board, according to Alternet. Hammond could be seen standing (in Blumenthal's footage) beside Hagee at a press conference earlier in the day disputing the groups' focus on end-times theology in its support for Israel.

          Hagee told reporters that "our support of Israel has absolutely nothing to do with end-times prophecy. It has absolutely nothing to do with eschatology." Mac Hammond defended Hagee and said that questions about eschatology (the-ology and philosophy concerned with the final events in the history of the world) "distracted" from the discussion. Alternet's Sarah Posner asked one of Hagee's public relations people about CUFI and eschatology. She said that Hagee wears two hats: one as preacher, the other as political activist.

          At the Night to Honor Israel event at the summit, Hagee said, "God deals with nations, churches and people as they deal with Israel and the Jewish people."

          "It is 1938 all over again," said Hagee. "Iran is Germany, Ahmadinejad is Hitler and he is talking about killing the Jews. The only way to prevent a nuclear war is to make certain it never starts. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad will not give in to sanctions. It is time for America to adopt Sen. [Joseph] Lieberman's words and consider a military pre-emptive strike against Iran."

          Presidential candidate Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., made a surprise visit to the summit. During a presentation he said, "The bond between America and Israel is not just a strategic one, though that is important. The more profound tie between our two countries is a moral one. We are two democracies whose alliance is forged in our common values. To be proudly pro-American and pro-Israeli is not to hold conflicting loyalties. It is about defending the principles that both countries hold dear. That is why today I stand as I believe so many of you do: a Christian, proudly pro-American and proudly pro-Israel."

          While one high-profile Minnesotan, Hammond, is enthusiastically supportive of CUFI, another, Rep. Betty McCollum, D-Minn., is outspoken in opposition to CUFI's message and its leader, John Hagee. "Well-publicized statements by Pastor Hagee demonstrate extremism, bigotry and intolerance that is repugnant," wrote McCollum in an April letter to Hagee declining an invitation to CUFI's a Night to Honor Israel at Mac Hammond's Brooklyn Park church. McCollum's Chief of Staff Bill Harper met with Minnesota members of CUFI last week.

          "[CUFI] is really frankly a radical leadership," Harper told the San Antonio Express News. "They are dangerous to any prospects of ending the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians."

          Comment


          • #6
            On the other hand...

            U.S. Christians voice support for Palestinian state

            NEW YORK: In recent years, conservative evangelicals who claimed a biblical mandate to protect Israel have built a bulwark of support for the Jewish state - sending donations, denouncing its critics and urging it not to evacuate settlements or forfeit territory.

            Now more than 30 evangelical leaders have stepped forward to say these efforts have given the wrong impression about the stance of many, if not most, U.S. Christians.

            On Friday, these leaders sent a letter to President George W. Bush saying that both Israelis and Palestinians had "legitimate rights stretching back for millennia to the lands of Israel/Palestine," and that they supported the creation of a Palestinian state "that includes the vast majority of the West Bank."

            They said that being a friend to Jews and to Israel "does not mean withholding criticism when it is warranted." The letter added, "Both Israelis and Palestinians have committed violence and injustice against each other."

            The letter was signed by 34 evangelical leaders, many of whom lead denominations, Christian charities, ministry organizations, seminaries and universities.

            They include Gary Benedict, president of The Christian and Missionary Alliance, a denomination of 2,000 churches; Richard Mouw, president of Fuller Theological Seminary; Gordon MacDonald, chairman of World Relief; Richard Stearns, president of World Vision; David Neff, editor of Christianity Today; and Berten Waggoner, national director and president of The Vineyard USA, an association of 630 churches in the United States.

            "This group is in no way anti-Israel, and we make it very clear we're committed to the security of Israel," said Ronald Sider, president of Evangelicals for Social Action, which often takes liberal positions on issues. "But we want a solution that is viable."

            "Obviously, there would have to be compromises," he added.

            They are clearly aiming their message not just at Bush, but at the Muslim world and policy makers in the U.S. State Department.

            Sider said he and three other evangelical leaders got the idea for the letter in February at the U.S.-Islamic World Forum in Doha, Qatar, where they met Muslim and U.S. diplomats who were shocked to discover the existence of American evangelicals who favored a Palestinian state. Sider said they would translate the letter into Arabic and distribute it in the Middle East and Europe.

            "We think it's crucial that the Muslim world realize that there are evangelical Christians in the U.S. in large numbers that want a fair solution," Sider said.

            In the past year and half, liberal and moderate evangelicals have initiated two other efforts that demonstrated fissures in the evangelical movement. Last year, they parted with the conservative flank by campaigning against climate change and global warming. This year, they denounced the use of torture in the fight against terrorism. Some of the participants in those campaigns also signed this letter.

            The Reverend Joel Hunter, senior pastor of Northland Church in Longwood, Florida, said: "There is a part of the evangelical family which is what I call Christian Zionists, who are just so staunchly pro-Israel that Israel and their side can do no wrong, and it's almost anti-biblical to criticize Israel for anything. But there are many more evangelicals who are really open and seek justice for both parties."

            The loudest and best-organized voices in the evangelical movement have been sending a very different message: that the Palestinians have no legitimate claim to the land.

            The Reverend John Hagee, who founded Christians United for Israel, was informed of the letter and read most of it. He responded: "Bible-believing evangelicals will scoff at that message."

            "Christians United for Israel is opposed to America pressuring Israel to give up more land to anyone for any reason," Hagee said.

            "What has the policy of appeasement ever produced for Israel that was beneficial?" he added.

            "God gave to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob a covenant in the Book of Genesis for the land of Israel that is eternal and unbreakable, and that covenant is still intact," he said. "The Palestinian people have never owned the land of Israel, never existed as an autonomous society. There is no Palestinian language. There is no Palestinian currency. And to say that Palestinians have a right to that land historically is an historical fraud."

            Christians United for Israel held a conference with 4,500 attendees in Washington this month, and Hagee sends e-mail action alerts on Israel every Monday to 55,000 pastors and leaders.

            There is a crucial theological difference between Hagee's views on Israel and those expressed by the letter writers, said Timothy Weber, a church historian, former seminary president and the author of "On the Road to Armageddon: How Evangelicals Became Israel's Best Friend."

            Hagee and others are dispensationalists, Weber said, who interpret the Bible as predicting that in order for Christ to return, the Jews must gather in Israel, the third temple must be built in Jerusalem and the Battle of Armageddon must be fought.

            Weber said, "The dispensationalists have parlayed what is a distinctly minority position theologically within evangelicalism into a major political voice."

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            • #7
              What's up with the weird dancing in that video. Sorry to say, but some of those people look like they're on something.

              Anyways, the Rapture isn't even a word used in the Bible. The problem is they are taking Bible prophecy too literally. The Bible speaks about a "new Jerusalem", a spiritual one, not literal Israel.

              Oh, and BB, Moses was the writer of the first 5 books of the Bible.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by admin View Post
                What's up with the weird dancing in that video. Sorry to say, but some of those people look like they're on something.

                Anyways, the Rapture isn't even a word used in the Bible. The problem is they are taking Bible prophecy too literally. The Bible speaks about a "new Jerusalem", a spiritual one, not literal Israel.

                Oh, and BB, Moses was the writer of the first 5 books of the Bible.
                haha... i think that that was a SAAAAAAD attempt at dabke. I know the Israelis do that dance as well as the Arabs, so since they're trying to kiss up.... ...

                thanks for clarifying what he said

                Comment


                • #9
                  And there was me thinking that Moses was merely the receptor for the first five books of the Bible



                  V

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by voltaire View Post
                    And there was me thinking that Moses was merely the receptor for the first five books of the Bible



                    V
                    lol! me too

                    Comment

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