Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Iraq analysis

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • List of new Iraqi Cabinet Ministers:

    37 men and four women:

    Prime minister: Nouri al-Maliki, (Shi'ite)

    Deputy prime minister: Barham Saleh, (Kurd)

    Deputy prime minister: Salam Zikam Ali al-Zubaie, (Sunni Arab)

    Acting interior minister: Nouri al-Maliki (Shi'ite)

    Acting defense minister: Salam Zikam Ali al-Zubaie, (Sunni)

    Oil minister: Hussain al-Shahristani, (Shi'ite)

    Finance minister: Bayan Jabr, (Shi'ite)

    Trade minister: Abed Falah al-Sudani, (Shi'ite)

    Foreign minister: Hoshyar Zebari, (Kurd)

    Justice minister: Hashim al-Shebli, (Sunni)

    Electricity minister: Karim Waheed, (Shi'ite)

    Industry minister: Fawzi al-Hariri, (Kurd)

    Water resources minister: Latif Rashid, (Kurd)

    Housing and construction minister: Bayan Dazee, (Kurd)

    Agriculture minister: Yarrub Nazim, (Shi'ite)

    Education minister: Khudayer Al-Khuzaie, (Shi'ite)

    Higher education minister: Abed Theyab, (Sunni)

    Health minister: Ali Al-Shemari, (Shi'ite)

    Transport minister: Karim Mahdi, (Shi'ite)

    Migration minister: Abdul-Samad Rahman, (Shi'ite)

    Acting minister of state for national security: Barham Saleh, (Kurd)

    Minister of state for civil society affairs: Adel al-Assadi, (Shi'ite)

    Minister of state for House of Representatives affairs: Safa al-Safi, Shiite.

    Youth and sports minister: Jassim Mohammed Jaafar, (Shi'ite)

    Minister of state for tourism and archaeology affairs: Liwa Semeism, (Shi'ite)

    Planning and development cooperation minister: Ali Baban, (Sunni)

    Communications minister: Mohammed Twafiq, (Shi'ite)

    Labor and social affairs minister: Mahmoud Mohammed al-Radhi, (Shi'ite)

    Municipalities and public works minister: Riyad Gharib, (Shi'ite)

    Environment minister: Narmin Othman, (Kurd)

    Culture minister: Assad Kamal Mohammed, (Kurd)

    Minister of state for womens affairs: Fatin Abdel-Rahman, (Sunni)

    Minister of state for provincial affairs: Saad Tahir Abid, (Sunni)

    Science and technology minister: Raed Fahmi, (Sunni)

    Human rights minister: Wijdan Mikaeil, (Christian)

    Minister of state for Foreign Affairs: Rafaa al-Esawi, (Sunni)

    Minister of national dialogue: Akram al-Hakim, (Shi'ite)

    Minister of state: Mohammed Abbas Auraibi, (Shi'ite)

    Minister of state: Ali Mohammed Ahmed, (Kurd)

    Minister of state: Hassan Rhadi Khazim, (Shi'ite)


    Kurds are predominantly Sunni, but many are Shi'ites (Faili Kurds), and the region they claim control over contains Christians, Sunni Arabs, Shi'ite Arabs, Turkomen and Yezidis yet it is an 'ethnic' rather than a religious marker that is used to identify Kurdish politicians.
    Last edited by Guest 123; 21st May 2006, 00:05.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Al-khiyal
      37 men and four women:

      Prime minister: Nouri al-Maliki, (Shi'ite)

      Deputy prime minister: Barham Saleh, (Kurd)

      Deputy prime minister: Salam Zikam Ali al-Zubaie, (Sunni Arab)

      Acting interior minister: Nouri al-Maliki (Shi'ite)

      Acting defense minister: Salam Zikam Ali al-Zubaie, (Sunni)

      Oil minister: Hussain al-Shahristani, (Shi'ite)

      Finance minister: Bayan Jabr, (Shi'ite)

      Trade minister: Abed Falah al-Sudani, (Shi'ite)

      Foreign minister: Hoshyar Zebari, (Kurd)

      Justice minister: Hashim al-Shebli, (Sunni)

      Electricity minister: Karim Waheed, (Shi'ite)

      Industry minister: Fawzi al-Hariri, (Kurd)

      Water resources minister: Latif Rashid, (Kurd)

      Housing and construction minister: Bayan Dazee, (Kurd)

      Agriculture minister: Yarrub Nazim, (Shi'ite)

      Education minister: Khudayer Al-Khuzaie, (Shi'ite)

      Higher education minister: Abed Theyab, (Sunni)

      Health minister: Ali Al-Shemari, (Shi'ite)

      Transport minister: Karim Mahdi, (Shi'ite)

      Migration minister: Abdul-Samad Rahman, (Shi'ite)

      Acting minister of state for national security: Barham Saleh, (Kurd)

      Minister of state for civil society affairs: Adel al-Assadi, (Shi'ite)

      Minister of state for House of Representatives affairs: Safa al-Safi, Shiite.

      Youth and sports minister: Jassim Mohammed Jaafar, (Shi'ite)

      Minister of state for tourism and archaeology affairs: Liwa Semeism, (Shi'ite)

      Planning and development cooperation minister: Ali Baban, (Sunni)

      Communications minister: Mohammed Twafiq, (Shi'ite)

      Labor and social affairs minister: Mahmoud Mohammed al-Radhi, (Shi'ite)

      Municipalities and public works minister: Riyad Gharib, (Shi'ite)

      Environment minister: Narmin Othman, (Kurd)

      Culture minister: Assad Kamal Mohammed, (Kurd)

      Minister of state for womens affairs: Fatin Abdel-Rahman, (Sunni)

      Minister of state for provincial affairs: Saad Tahir Abid, (Sunni)

      Science and technology minister: Raed Fahmi, (Sunni)

      Human rights minister: Wijdan Mikaeil, (Christian)

      Minister of state for Foreign Affairs: Rafaa al-Esawi, (Sunni)

      Minister of national dialogue: Akram al-Hakim, (Shi'ite)

      Minister of state: Mohammed Abbas Auraibi, (Shi'ite)

      Minister of state: Ali Mohammed Ahmed, (Kurd)

      Minister of state: Hassan Rhadi Khazim, (Shi'ite)


      Kurds are predominantly Sunni, but many are Shi'ites (Faili Kurds), and the region they claim control over contains Christians, Sunni Arabs, Shi'ite Arabs, Turkomen and Yezidis yet it is an 'ethnic' rather than a religious marker that is used to identify Kurdish politicians.
      For me any government formed under US occupation can only be a US client government, a puppet government which will receive its orders from the White House. The only way to resolve this mess is for the US army to leave Iraq and not be seen to be rewarded for its illegal invasion irrespective of what one might think of the previous regime.


      ***Edited your quote to correct the female representation ya Bernaoui***
      Last edited by Guest 123; 21st May 2006, 00:08.
      A dios rogando y con el mazo dando

      Comment


      • No quibbles with that view, ya Bernaoui. Having initially resisted elections, until their hand was forced by Sistani's threats to mobilise his followers, U.S. efforts to subsequently shape the character of party political leaderships and the entire political process are so blatantly anti-democratic and illustrative of the lack of real Iraqi sovereignty as to need little comment. And you are absolutely correct, a war crime should not be rewarded by the installation of a client-regime that serves as a tool for the aggressors.

        And wasn't it George W. Bush, speaking of the Syrian presence in the Lebanon, who said that 'democracy cannot flourish under occupation'? No sense of irony there, eh?

        Comment


        • Quid custodiet ipsos custodes?


          Under a foreign flag: A class of 450 Iraqi police officers graduated last month in Basra

          As chaos swept Iraq after the American invasion in 2003, the Pentagon began its effort to rebuild the Iraqi police with a mere dozen advisers. Overmatched from the start, one was sent to train a 4,000-officer unit to guard power plants and other utilities. A second to advise 500 commanders in Baghdad. Another to organize a border patrol for the entire country.

          Three years later, the police are a battered and dysfunctional force that has helped bring Iraq to the brink of civil war. Police units stand accused of operating death squads for powerful political groups or simple profit. Citizens, deeply distrustful of the force, are setting up their own neighborhood security squads. Killings of police officers are rampant, with at least 547 slain this year, roughly as many as Iraqi and American soldiers combined, records show.

          The police, initially envisioned by the Bush administration as a cornerstone in a new democracy, have instead become part of Iraq's grim constellation of shadowy commandos, ruthless political militias and other armed groups. Iraq's new prime minister and senior American officials now say that the country's future — and the ability of America to withdraw its troops — rests in large measure on whether the police can be reformed and rogue groups reined in.....

          Misjudgments marred U.S. plans for Iraqi police

          7-page article

          Comment


          • WASHINGTON - Forthcoming military investigations into alleged war crimes in Iraq will show that a squad of U.S. Marines killed about 24 Iraqi civilians, including women and children, while on a patrol in Haditha in November - a higher number than first believed - and then gave inaccurate reports on the incident to their commanders, a congressional Republican said Friday.....

            Inquiries may shed light on Iraqi civilian deaths

            Comment


            • The new Italian government will hold a meeting next week to work out a withdrawal plan for Italy's troops from Iraq, Foreign Minister Massimo D'Alema said on Saturday.

              D'Alema, who is also a deputy prime minister, told reporters during a visit to the southern city of Naples that the meeting would likely be held on Wednesday.

              The centre-left government of Prime Minister Romano Prodi has said it wanted to bring home Italy's remaining 2,600 troops from Iraq but has not yet given its own timeframe.

              According to a plan already put in place by the previous government of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, 1,000 more troops are due to return by the end of June and the rest by the end of the year.

              Some government officials have said the new administration could decide to speed up the withdrawal but Prodi has promised to do so in coordination with the Iraqi government and the other foreign forces in Iraq.

              D'Alema said the new government planned to convert Italy's presence in Iraq to one that would be totally civilian in nature and that would continue to help people there.

              "We are not running away but we want to convert our commitment into a civilian presence in the best tradition of Italy," he said.

              Prodi told the Senate earlier this week that the new government felt the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq was a "grave mistake" and that his government wanted no part in what he called an "occupation."

              Italy to decide next week on Iraq withdrawal

              Comment


              • On a day heralded as a new beginning for Iraq, many Iraqis were divided on whether the newly inaugurated national unity government will be able to curtail sectarian violence in the country.

                "We have been waiting for a genuine change in Iraqi life since the fall of Saddam's regime in 2003, but the security ... has deteriorated from worse to worst," said Zakyaa Nasir, 52, in the southern city of Amarah. Her husband was an Iraqi soldier killed during the Iran-Iraq war in the 1980s.

                Issam al-Rawi, the head of the University Professors Association in Baghdad, said a government of Shiite, Sunni and Kurdish representatives will succeed only if Iraqis can set aside sectarian and ethnic divisions to stand together under a national identity.

                "We have some reservations," al-Rawi said. "The ministers have to give up their sectarian and factional and racial affiliations and be loyal only to their country."

                Parliament inaugurated Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and his new Cabinet during a special legislative session in Baghdad's heavily guarded Green Zone on Saturday. But as the new government was formed, attacks continued in the capital and other areas of Iraq.

                The Cabinet nominations took months of negotiations after Iraq elected a new parliament last December. The new 40-member Cabinet is Iraq's first constitutional government since the fall of Saddam Hussein.

                Fuad Ali Kadom, 42, a power station engineer in Baghdad, said the new government was "a real beginning of a new Iraq."

                "We don't care for names as much as we care for the services they will offer," he said. Iraq's infrastructure remains dilapidated and many Iraqis don't have electricity as the summer heat approaches.

                One of the new government's programs calls for the restoration of Iraqi infrastructure, including a program detailing an entire reconstruction plan for the country.

                "The forming of a new government is a cheerful day," said Sawsan Yalman, 31, a Turkoman student. "But the government has to solve essential problems, especially the security problem and fighting terrorist and armed groups."

                The violence raised doubts on how effective a government could be, said al-Saied Mohammed, 44, a former Iraqi soldier who lives in Amarah.

                "I am pessimistic," said Mohammed. "They are working for their personal interests."

                Iraqis split on government's effectiveness

                Comment


                • As a new 'national unity' government prepares to take power in Baghdad, Ghaith Abdul-Ahad reports from behind the lines of a vicious sectarian conflict rapidly spiralling towards civil war:


                  Iraqi Sunni children with toy guns at a checkpoint in their neighbourhood of al-Yarmouk, Baghdad

                  Some men hold paper tissues under their noses; others wrap their kuffiya ends around their mouths. It is a hot and humid day at the city's main morgue where 20 men stand in a yard, their faces pressed with silent urgency against the bars of a window, next to a white plastic sign that baldly announces the location of "The Refrigerator".
                  Inside sits the clerk of the morgue, his computer monitor turned towards them. Faces flash on the screen: a man with his face blackened and bruised; another man, older, maybe in his 50s, with a white beard and an orange-sized hole in his forehead; and another on a green stretcher, his arms twisted unnaturally behind him.

                  Occasionally the silence of Baghdad's daily slideshow of death is broken by an appalled act of recognition, as one of the men mumbles "No god but the one God" or "God is great."

                  So many bodies arrive at the morgue each day - 40 is not unusual on a "quiet" day - that it is impossible to let relatives in to identify them. Hence the slideshow in the yard outside. The bodies are dumped in sewage plants or irrigation canals, or just in the middle of the street. Many show signs of torture. Every morning a procession of pickup trucks, minibuses and cars line up with their coffins outside the concrete blast walls of the ministry of health to pick up their cargo. One death often courts another. Many Sunnis say the mourners are attacked en route. When they go to retrieve the body of a relative, family members often wait in the car clutching their weapons in anticipation.

                  The ministry is under the control of the Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, and a large mural of his dead ayatollah father decorates the entrance to the compound. Most of the security guards in the morgue and the ministry are affiliated to his militia, the Mahdi army, one of the militias thought to be behind the sectarian killing going on in their neighbourhoods.

                  "Why do you want to go inside? Those inside are all terrorists, Sunni terrorists," said Captain Abu Ahmad, the officer in charge of security at the morgue, when the Guardian presented a document granting permission from the ministry of health to visit. "If you want to see innocent victims, go to the hospitals and see the victims of Sunni terrorism on Shia civilians."

                  After months of argument about whether Iraq is teetering on the verge of civil war, a "national unity" government is due to be inaugurated today. Legislators plan to swear in a new prime minister and cabinet, and much will be made in London and Washington of the fact that this completes a democratic transition that began in December with the election of its parliament. But the reality encountered during three weeks behind the barricades of Baghdad's increasingly bloody sectarian conflict has more in common with the "ethnic cleansing" of the Balkans than the optimistic rhetoric to be heard on the manicured lawns of the embassy compounds and in western capitals......

                  Continue reading Inside Iraq's hidden war

                  Comment


                  • Suicide bomber kills at least 12, injures 14 inside downtown Baghdad restaurant

                    Comment


                    • Iraq's Prime Minister Nuri al- Maliki said on Sunday he will name defense and interior ministers for his government of national unity in the next "two to three days."

                      Maliki told a news conference after his first cabinet meeting his government would use "maximum force" against guerrilla violence but will also hold out the prospect of dialogue with those prepared to join the political process.

                      Iraq's Maliki to name key security posts in days

                      Comment


                      • New dawn for Iraq marked by bloodshed

                        Comment


                        • Seeking priority care for their wounded, Iraqi soldiers, police attack physicians:

                          On a bad day in Baghdad's busiest Iraqi ER - and they're all bad - the men wielding AK-47 assault rifles and pistols can outnumber the men and women with scalpels and stretchers 2 to 1.

                          "Help us out here!" called a blood-soaked man who had hauled his third pickup-truck load of dead and wounded men and women from a recent market bombing to the emergency room at Yarmouk Hospital.

                          But armed Iraqi soldiers in camouflage and flak vests ignored the plea. Instead, they hustled comrades wounded in a clash with insurgents into the already crowded ER, where gunmen in civilian garb had brought their own bleeding friends.

                          "We have no problems with pistols and AK-47s, but sometimes they come with their bigger machine guns into this small ward," Nail Ali Hussein, a pediatric surgeon turned trauma specialist, said as he made his way around four Iraqi soldiers in battle gear clustered around a comrade with a chest wound. "A scratch," Hussein said dismissively of the injury.

                          Located in west Baghdad, the bloodiest half of the Iraqi capital, Yarmouk has coped for three years with an unrelenting daily stream of wounded, dying and dead. The U.S. emergency room depicted in the HBO documentary "Baghdad ER," airing for the first time Sunday night, does similar work for wounded U.S. military personnel and Iraqi civilians, but compared to this one it's secure and well equipped......

                          Continue reading Violence invades Baghdad's Emergency Rooms

                          2-page article

                          Comment


                          • Image management:

                            TONY BLAIR has instructed his aides to draw up plans for British troops to be withdrawn from Iraq and Northern Ireland by the autumn of next year.

                            The prime minister believes that his best chance of securing his place in the history books is with a legacy as a “peacemaker” after his reputation with the left was damaged by the Iraq war and power sharing in the province collapsed.

                            Blair’s aides, including Sir Nigel Sheinwald, his chief foreign policy adviser, are working on the timetable which would see gradual troop reductions taking place over the next 18 months.

                            Blair is believed to be ready to quit around the time of Labour’s 2007 party conference and make way for Gordon Brown as his successor, provided the chancellor is loyal and backs his agenda until then.

                            This weekend it appeared that Blair and Brown had reached a truce after three months of warring between the two camps.

                            Peace talks about a stable and orderly transition of power are under way, with “honest brokers” Lords Soley and Kinnock being influential in the process.

                            Blair and President George W Bush will announce that they are to begin withdrawing troops from Iraq at a summit in Washington being planned for this week to welcome the formation of a new Iraqi government.

                            The process has been carefully choreographed in an attempt to bolster the popularity of both leaders, which has been dragged down by the war......

                            Continue reading ‘Peacemaker’ Blair wants troops out of Iraq next year

                            2-page article

                            Comment


                            • BAGHDAD, Iraq - Prime Minister Tony Blair said Monday that the establishment of Iraq's unity government means there is no longer any justification for armed insurgency and that the best way to get foreign troops to leave is for insurgents to lay down their arms.

                              He refused, however, to set a timetable for the withdrawal of the 8,000 British troops in Iraq and said their return home was governed by conditions on the ground.

                              Blair was the first world leader to visit Iraq since its new government was inaugurated Saturday. The British leader flew into Baghdad on Monday, arriving by helicopter in the fortified Green Zone for a meeting with his Iraqi counterpart, Nouri al-Maliki......

                              Blair talks of a 'new beginning' in Iraq

                              Comment


                              • At least 24 killed in bombings, shootings in Iraq

                                Comment

                                Unconfigured Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X