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Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi released

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  • Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi released

    The opposition leader will be confined to her home for at least six months more, despite pressure from the U.N. and Western nations:

    BANGKOK, Thailand — The Myanmar government today extended the house arrest of Nobel Peace Prize laureate and opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi despite intense international pressure and a personal appeal from U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.

    Suu Kyi, who advocates peaceful change to bring democracy to the country, has been detained for more than 10 of the last 17 years. She was last arrested three years ago after her motorcade was attacked in an apparent attempt to assassinate her.

    Her detention had been due to expire today. For many, Suu Kyi embodies the democracy movement in Myanmar, also known as Burma, and the decision of the military regime to detain her for an additional period of at least six months was a major setback for the opposition.

    Annan, making a rare televised appeal to the leader of a U.N. member nation, had called on Myanmar Sr. Gen. Than Shwe to free Suu Kyi and allow her party, the National League for Democracy, to participate in rebuilding the country.

    "For the democratic process and the reconciliation process to be truly successful, it has to be inclusive," Annan said during a stop in Thailand. "And she has a role to play. And I'm relying on you, Gen. Than Shwe, to do the right thing."

    Suu Kyi, 60, has been under house arrest or imprisoned on and off since 1989. Her party won more than 80% of the seats in parliament in 1990 and she probably would have become the country's leader, but the military regime refused to honor the election and hand over power.

    Annan's appeal came as Myanmar considered whether to extend Suu Kyi's detention or release her. She was last arrested in May 2003, and her detention has periodically been extended. The regime informed wire services of the latest such move today.......

    More.....

  • #2
    Relative of Myanmar's Suu Kyi files first petition to UN rights council

    WASHINGTON : A family member of Myanmar's jailed pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Thursday filed the first petition with a new UN Human Rights Council challenging her detention by the country's military junta.

    The petition was filed just as the Geneva-based council officially took over at 2200 GMT Thursday from the discredited UN Commission on Human Rights, which has been abolished by the world body as part of UN reforms.

    It was filed on the relative's behalf by American lawyer Jared Genser, who is also president of Freedom Now, a US-based group striving to free "prisoners of conscience" across the globe.

    Freedom Now filed the petition directly to the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention, a five-member panel of human rights experts led by Algerian judge Leila Zerrougui which will operate under the council.

    "I think it is highly appropriate that this first case filed to this new human rights council is on behalf of such an important symbol of freedom, democracy and human rights in the world," Genser told AFP.

    He declined to name the member of the detained leader's family who authorised him to file the petition, saying he had to "maintain their privacy."

    Aung San Suu Kyi is the world's only imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and has spent more than 10 of the last 17 years under house arrest.

    Defying international demands for her freedom, Myanmar's military rulers in late May extended her arrest for another year.

    Previously, the UN working group had declared that her house arrest was in violation of international law.

    "This new petition to the working group is necessary because the latest working group's declaration in 2004 expired when the military junta in Burma (Myanmar) issued a new detention order on May 27, 2006," Genser said.

    "We need to reaffirm that her extended house arrest is a violation of international law," he explained.....

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    • #3
      Aung San Suu Kyi's arrest and sad situation is not bothering America ???? Im surprised .
      If Aung san Suu Kyi was in SYria or Iran , she would have been freed years ago .
      Friendship

      [60:8] GOD does not enjoin you from befriending those who do not fight you because of religion, and do not evict you from your homes. You may befriend them and be equitable towards them. GOD loves the equitable.

      [60:9] GOD enjoins you only from befriending those who fight you because of religion, evict you from your homes, and band together with others to banish you. You shall not befriend them. Those who befriend them are the transgressors

      Comment


      • #4
        And if she was Palestinian, we'd hear about it in the press every day.



        V

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by voltaire
          And if she was Palestinian, we'd hear about it in the press every day.

          V
          Sure about that ya voltaire? Most Palestinian leaders have been subjected to 'targeted assassination' or assassination attempts - hardly material for an extended media presence.

          Comment


          • #6
            The point I was driving at

            Looking at the sheer volume (rightly) of coverage of the oppression in Palestine, relative to the (lack of) coverage of oppression in Burma/Myanmar, I'd say I was pretty much spot on.

            It's a case for more coverage of cases like Aung San Suu Kyi's, not for less coverage of Palestine.

            Similarly, one reads a lot (rightly) about Palestine and Iraq, but almost nothing about the Uighur in China, or even Falun Gong - who are reduced to selling their own stories on street corners in the UK.



            V

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by voltaire
              And if she was Palestinian, we'd hear about it in the press every day.



              V
              I dont think so . there are thousands of Palestinians prisoners , some who have been there for decades , there are 300 of children too , less than 18 years of age but we dont get to hear about them either .

              There is a prison in Israel that has a number only and does not show on any map of israel , and god knows what goes on in there. i heard of it during a documentary.
              Friendship

              [60:8] GOD does not enjoin you from befriending those who do not fight you because of religion, and do not evict you from your homes. You may befriend them and be equitable towards them. GOD loves the equitable.

              [60:9] GOD enjoins you only from befriending those who fight you because of religion, evict you from your homes, and band together with others to banish you. You shall not befriend them. Those who befriend them are the transgressors

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by nesreen
                Aung San Suu Kyi's arrest and sad situation is not bothering America ???? Im surprised .
                America won't be bothered because they are being bribed by the Myanmar military junta by buying billions of dollars worth of goods from America and allowing them to over-invoice.
                Myanmar is in the crescent of opium producing countries.
                The junta makes bilions in opium trade and also allows its friends to make money in this business.
                So why bother if a puny stupid woman is jailed for 10 years!

                Come to think of political justice !
                And fight for establishing democracy and a free society in the world!

                All nations are hypocratic and the United Nations is a grand eye wash:
                And a dubious forum for passing resolutins to serve as excuses for the powerful nations to indulge in rowdyism!

                It is a shame that UN still exists!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by sania
                  It is a shame that UN still exists!
                  Great Post sania .

                  I agree . everytime i see someone unjust or unfair , i wonder what is the UN doing . I just realized it has become a tool in the US and israel hands they cand use it to suit their agenda . i dont think the UN should represent all countries in the world, it represents the Elite only In the west .
                  Friendship

                  [60:8] GOD does not enjoin you from befriending those who do not fight you because of religion, and do not evict you from your homes. You may befriend them and be equitable towards them. GOD loves the equitable.

                  [60:9] GOD enjoins you only from befriending those who fight you because of religion, evict you from your homes, and band together with others to banish you. You shall not befriend them. Those who befriend them are the transgressors

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by nesreen
                    Great Post sania .

                    I agree . everytime i see someone unjust or unfair , i wonder what is the UN doing . I just realized it has become a tool in the US and israel hands they cand use it to suit their agenda . i dont think the UN should represent all countries in the world, it represents the Elite only In the west .
                    lol, funny, the USA doesn't see it that way.



                    V

                    Comment


                    • #12


                      Aung San Suu Kyi turns 61 under house arrest

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        On June 19 Nobel laureate and pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi celebrated her 61st birthday alone, still under house arrest in Myanmar. It capped another tumultous year in which both she and the nation seem even further away from freedom.

                        Just weeks earlier hope had swirled among her party, the National League for Democracy (NLD), and the international community that she would be released. But the ruling military junta in Myanmar dashed those hopes on May 27, extending her house arrest for another year.

                        Since being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, Suu Kyi has risen far beyond her status as leader of the NLD to a legendary global figure, known as the fearless voice of the fight for democracy in Myanmar, the country formerly known as Burma.

                        Every step of the way she has faced harassment, with the regime keeping her in confinement for 10 of the last 17 years, effectively cut off from her party and the rest of the world.

                        Now, as the regime, known officially as the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC), continues to tighten its grip on the Burmese people and concentrate its power, hopes for Suu Kyi and for progress toward democracy in Myanmar seem increasingly dim.

                        The daughter of Burmese independence hero Aung San, Suu Kyi spent much of her adult life studying and working abroad. She was propelled into Burmese politics when she returned to the country to care for her sick mother. It was 1988 and student demonstrations against the regime were raging. Suu Kyi formed the NLD and began publicly calling for democracy — her first speech, in August of that year, was before half a million people in Rangoon (now Yangon).

                        Aung Din was there in 1988. One of the student leaders heading the protests, he led a group of 100 students protecting Suu Kyi during the speech.

                        "I remember her sitting with us at the back of the stage, after her speech, relaxing among the students," says Aung Din, now the policy director and co-founder of the U.S. Campaign for Burma. "The atmosphere in 1988 was like a bomb about to explode. General dissatisfaction among the population on General Ne Win's government was mounting day after day."

                        A bomb did explode in 1988, but in the form of a violent government crackdown that killed an estimated 3,000 people. Ruling General Ne Win had resigned in the meantime, and the generals consolidated power in the form of a new military junta, billed as the State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC). They changed the name to the SPDC in 1997.

                        For Suu Kyi and the NLD, it was the beginning of an ebb-and-flow fight for democracy that has seen occasional glimpses of hope quashed by the regime.

                        Suu Kyi was placed under house arrest in 1989, yet the NLD soared to a landslide victory in parliamentary elections in 1990. The military refused to recognize the results and began sweeping action against the NLD, rounding up leaders and closing offices. Suu Kyi fought on over the next decade, in and out of house arrest. Events came to a head in 2003 when a pro-government militia attacked her convoy during a journey outside the capital. As many as 70 people were killed in the attack and Suu Kyi was detained yet again.

                        Despite the regime's campaign to silence her — or perhaps, because of it — Suu Kyi today remains the sole figure for nonviolent struggle, democratic change and political reconciliation in Myanmar. And the regime, now led by Senior General Than Shwe, knows it.

                        "She has been seized upon as a symbol of democracy, of honesty, of a new peaceful Burma that will be governed by the people — these are the things the military wants to destroy," says Josef Silverstein, a professor emeritus at Rutgers University and author of several books about Burma.

                        Myanmar's leaders play up fears of chaos in order to keep a tight grip on the country, Silverstein says. "That justifies the military maintaining its power. It has to hold the country together, and it can only hold it together by force of arms."

                        As international pressure mounts on Myanmar, with the U.S. campaigning for a resolution in the United Nations Security Council calling for Suu Kyi's release and democratic reform, the ruling junta seems to be digging in further.

                        In a sudden and perplexing move, the regime announced late last year it was moving the capital from Yangon to Pyinmana, in central Myanmar. The shift is ongoing, with government buildings springing up in front of mystified locals in the remote region.

                        Explanations for the move differ. Many reports even cite General Than Shwe's tendency to heed the advice of fortune tellers (as many in Myanmar do) as a major factor.

                        Other reasons include a fear of a domestic uprising similar to 1988 — which could be weathered from an isolated base — and the desire for a more centralized seat of power from which to control the country's ethnic minorities.

                        Silverstein says the move also reflects the military's belief that "the U.S. is leading a world movement to destroy it."

                        "By retreating to this impregnable fortress that they're about to try to build, [the military leaders believe] they'll be able to weather the next charge, wherever it comes from," he says.

                        But Myanmar does have some allies, Silverstein says: "China and Russia are two crucial friends."

                        And both are veto-wielding powers on the Security Council. China's ties to Myanmar run deep. Trade between the two nations amounted to $1.145 billion in 2004, according to the Chinese government, and China is a major military supplier to Myanmar.

                        China's reluctance for a change in the status quo in Myanmar is the main obstacle in the Bush administration's push for a resolution in the U.N. "I would say mostly our discussions are about our disagreements with China," says U.S. mission spokesman Richard Grenell.

                        Meanwhile, the regime continues to promote its "road map," a plan it says will eventually lead to democracy. The first step is a national convention to draft a new constitution. But the NLD is boycotting the convention as long as Suu Kyi remains under house arrest, and much of the international community has labeled the process a sham, especially without NLD involvement.

                        Is there any way out of the stalemate?

                        "I think the regime feels that they're pretty much in the driver's seat right now. They've got everything under control," says Robert Helvey, a retired U.S. colonel who has taught non-violent resistance to groups around the world, including in Myanmar. "What I think they fear most of all is something suddenly happening, which is going to cause everything to unravel."

                        Myanmar's deteriorating economy could be a catalyst for change. Although Myanmar is rich in natural resources, the vast majority of its citizens are poor. Inflation is out of control, with the government raising its own salaries and flooding the market with cash. Even the price of rice is rising.

                        Economics drove the uprising of 1988, Silverstein notes. "The one real uprising by the people ... came largely because the Burmese military government had really hit them very hard in the pocketbook."

                        Aung Din says conditions are similar today to what he saw in 1988: "There is general dissatisfaction among the population."

                        But there is a major difference: Aung San Suu Kyi, the one person with the ability lead the charge, remains isolated in her Yangon villa. For now, all her party can do is hope for small steps.

                        "The NLD, they are very flexible," Aung Din says. "They are asking the military junta to talk. But it is a regime which refuses to talk."

                        As long as Suu Kyi remains under house arrest, it is clear the regime is also refusing to listen.

                        Myanmar: The crackdown continues

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Voltaire

                          I was referring to the UN paralysed by the Palestinian issue , yet ready to condemn anything else .
                          I was referring to Kofi Annan visiting every corner on the planet but not visiting Gaza that is being starved and dying and thirsty and isolated .
                          I was referring to the Dozens of UN resolutions against Israel for years that have been totally ignored and the UN can not do anything about them.
                          I was referring to the arrogance of the Israeli army and how the UN can not use strong words to condemn their disrespect to human rights in the territories.
                          Any Resolution against an Arab or Muslim or a third world country must be implemented ASAP and the envoys get to be sent ASAP , otherwise sanctions cripple that country .
                          Friendship

                          [60:8] GOD does not enjoin you from befriending those who do not fight you because of religion, and do not evict you from your homes. You may befriend them and be equitable towards them. GOD loves the equitable.

                          [60:9] GOD enjoins you only from befriending those who fight you because of religion, evict you from your homes, and band together with others to banish you. You shall not befriend them. Those who befriend them are the transgressors

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Uh-huh.

                            So you're seriously trying to argue that the UN neglects Palestine by comparison with Myanmar?



                            V
                            Last edited by voltaire; 3 July 2006, 12:11.

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