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  • Fiji's prime minister goes into hiding following coup threat

    SUVA, Fiji (AP) -- Fiji's prime minister went into hiding Friday in anticipation of a coup, but a deadline set by the country's defiant military commander passed without the threatened ouster of the government.

    Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase said he understood the government had been given a reprieve until Monday to meet the military's demands, but armed forces chief Commodore Frank Bainimarama rejected the idea.

    "Who's saying the deadline has been extended?" Bainimarama told The Associated Press late Friday. "Is he the commander? I am the commander."

    On Saturday, the prime minister and a military envoy held separate talks with Fiji's vice president in apparent efforts to avert a coup.

    No officials made any comment, but the meetings raised hopes that there was still room for negotiation between the two sides despite a noon Friday deadline Bainimarama set for the government to meet a range of demands.

    Bainimarama has demanded the government kill legislation that would grant pardons to conspirators in a 2000 coup in the South Pacific island nation, and quash two other bills that he says unfairly favor majority indigenous Fijians over the ethnic Indian minority.

    He also is demanding the removal of Fiji's police chief, who has threatened to charge Bainimarama with sedition for his comments about toppling the government.

    Qarase, in phone interview with the Legend radio network, said he had made all the concessions he could within the law to Bainimarama, and urged Fijians to show their displeasure at the military's actions.

    "We are really fighting for our democracy," Qarase said. "We want freedom to live within a democratically civil government, where the government is elected by the people. That's what people want. We do not want a dictator."

    Washington has expressed deep concern at Bainimarama's threats and warned U.S. aid to the country could be cut if a coup occurs.

    The U.S. State Department on Friday warned Americans not to travel to Suva, Fiji, because of the uncertain security situation. It recommended that Americans already on the island evaluate their security.

    Foreign ministers from the 16-member South Pacific Forum said a coup would be "a tragedy for Fiji and would have dire consequences for the international reputation of the region as a whole."

    The 53-member Commonwealth of Britain and its former colonies also urged Bainimarama to back down.

    Fiji, a nation of about 900,000 people, is located about 1,800 miles northeast of Sydney, Australia. Fiji was rocked by two military coups in 1987 in addition to the civilian-led coup in 2000.

    Fiji's prime minister goes into hiding

  • #2
    Originally posted by Al-khiyal View Post
    SUVA, Fiji (AP) -- Fiji's prime minister went into hiding Friday in anticipation of a coup, but a deadline set by the country's defiant military commander passed without the threatened ouster of the government.


    Fiji's prime minister goes into hiding
    YAKHI HOUKOUMA CHKOUPI

    Was he afraid some fanatic who may had a bad Jumu3a...?
    A government that robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the support of Paul.
    By: George Bernard Shaw

    Comment


    • #3
      There's a call in Fiji for women to mediate between the government and the military as unease continues with threats of a military coup.

      A key NGO, the Citizens Constitutional Forum, says there's a clear absence of women being used as mediators despite offers of help during the impasse.

      The director of the Citizens Constitutional Forum, the Reverend Akuila Yabaki, claims that most of the members of the Great Council of Chiefs committee set up to mediate between the parties backed the 2000 coup.

      Rev Yabaki says its clear the military commander, Commodore Frank Bainimarama, is not listening to those in the chiefly hierarchy and needs to talk to people on the same level.

      "There are people who are acceptable to both sides. There's a clear absense of women. There's some outstanding women in Fiji who could be used and they are offering their skills, people who are involved in crises of different kinds, former counselling and other things."

      Rev Yabaki says political agendas are overriding efforts to resolve the situation.

      Call in Fiji for women to mediate between government and military over crisis

      Comment


      • #4
        A Fiji newspaper is reporting that the government there is to be overthrown tonight.

        The Sunday Post reported sources as saying the capital Suva would be locked down at 3am local time and road blocks would be put in place on major highways.

        It said the president would dismiss the current Government of Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase and dissolve parliament.

        Military commander Commodore Frank Bainimarama would then install an interim administration.

        Separate speculation in Suva has suggested former army chief Ratu Epeli Ganilau will be named prime minister.

        The Sunday Post also said its staff had been threatened by the military for its reporting and its Australian owner Alan Hickling was supporting applications for asylum in Australia for all employees.

        The unconfirmed report predicting a coup tonight came after Commodore Bainimarama said today there would be no further talks with Qarase.

        Fijilive.com reported him as saying: "I don’t have to meet with him anymore... His time has run out."

        Commodore Bainimarama is expected to give a TV address at 3pm.

        Newstalk ZB reported that police in Fiji are investigating a kidnap plot against Qarase. It is alleged there were plans to seize him on Thursday night.

        There were also rumours that Qarase would dissolve parliament and call a fresh election.

        He was attending a church service this morning and left without speaking to waiting media.

        * The New Zealand and Australian councils of trade unions today issued a joint call for the military and the Government of Fiji to negotiate a peaceful settlement that would maintain the country's democracy.

        They said they were concerned a military takeover could damage the Fijian economy and lead to a loss of jobs disadvantaging large numbers of working families in the country.

        Fiji government to be overthrown tonight - paper

        Comment


        • #5
          SUVA, Fiji — Troops in the South Pacific island nation of Fiji moved in on at least two police compounds Monday and removed weapons from one of them, raising fears the military was acting on its threats to overthrow the government.

          But Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase insisted the civilian government was still in charge, and police at the barracks being disarmed said troops were proceeding with the government's permission.

          Troops did not move on the main police barracks in downtown Suva, the capital, and the city remained quiet.

          It was unclear if the troops' actions were the first steps in a military takeover of the government, or fit within concessions Qarase has already offered to the military to avoid a coup.

          Military commander Commodore Frank Bainimarama has threatened to topple Qarase at any time, after saying last week that a deadline to meet his demands to "clean up" the government had expired.

          Bainimarama has demanded the government kill legislation that would grant pardons to conspirators in a 2000 coup and quash two other land rights bills that he says unfairly favor majority indigenous Fijians over the ethnic Indian minority.

          He also is demanding the removal of Fiji's police chief, who has threatened to charge Bainimarama with sedition for his comments about toppling the government.

          Washington has expressed deep concern at Bainimarama's threats and warned U.S. aid to the country could be cut if a coup occurs.

          As many as six truckloads of soldiers went to the police tactical unit's headquarters outside Suva and began loading weapons onto a truck Monday. Soldiers also showed up at the police training academy in Suva and surrounded a building reported to be a disused armory.

          Police Commissioner Moses Driver denied reports the military had taken over the compound, reportedly calling it a "friendly visit."

          "There is no confrontation of any sort," the Legend radio network also quoted Driver as saying.

          On Monday morning, Qarase said he was in his office in Suva and the government was still in charge. He said he was willing to hold more talks with Bainimarama on his demands but warned a coup would amount to treason.

          Fiji, a nation of about 900,000 people, is about 1,800 miles northeast of Sydney, Australia. Fiji was rocked by two military coups in 1987 and the civilian-led coup in 2000.

          Troop movement raises fears of Fiji coup

          Comment


          • #6


            Fiji troops disarm police

            Fiji police weapons taken to army camp

            Comment


            • #7
              Fiji's military is likely to force the embattled government of Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase to step aside on Monday, military chief Commander Frank Bainimarama said and warned Qarase not to oppose him.

              "Transition is expected to take place tomorrow as a deadline," Bainimarama told Fijian-language television on Sunday.

              Fiji's political crisis has reached breaking point amid widely held fears that the South Pacific island nation's fourth coup in 20 years was imminent.

              Qarase and Bainimarama have been embroiled in a power struggle all year. Bainimarama gave the government a list of "non-negotiable" demands almost a fortnight ago and threatened a "clean-up campaign".

              Bainimarama told Fiji television that he expected Qarase's government, re-elected in May for a second five-year term, to "give in peacefully" and leave office.

              "If resistance happens, the military will not be very kind and will come after first those who are inciting the resistance," he said.

              "It will be in the best interest of the prime minister not to resist his removal," said Bainimarama, who issued the government a deadline of last Friday to meet his demands.

              Qarase said earlier on Sunday that he had called an emergency meeting of his cabinet for Tuesday. Asked if he thought the military was about to remove him from office, Qarase said: "No".

              "What he's been saying, that will be totally illegal, it shall be against the constitution of Fiji, against the laws of Fiji, and it will amount to treason," Qarase told reporters.

              Bainimarama said that if Qarase opposed the military he would be sent to Nukulau island where George Speight, the leader of a 2000 coup by armed indigenous nationalists, is serving a life sentence for treason.

              Bainimarama said he was planning an interim government but that its line-up had yet to be finalised and that the transition would be "peaceful".

              "No one should be frightened about what's going to happen in the next couple of days," he said.

              The streets of the capital Suva were quiet and calm on Sunday as Qarase and Bainimarama joined thousands of church-goers in the deeply religious nation. Qarase had asked his people on Saturday to pray for their country.

              Bainimarama installed Qarase as interim leader after declaring martial law to put down the 2000 coup, but now accuses him of being too soft on those behind that coup and a failed but bloody mutiny linked to it in which the commander was almost killed.

              A Fijian newspaper, the Sunday Post, quoted unidentified government and military sources as saying the military would begin its "clean up" of the government at 3am on Monday.

              Fiji's political crisis has alarmed its South Pacific neighbours, with Australia sending three warships to the area in case it needs to evacuate holidaying nationals. Bainimarama has said his military would oppose any foreign intervention.

              The United States, Britain and the United Nations have all warned Bainimarama not to attempt to take over the government, with concerns that another coup would devastate the fragile local economy based on tourism and sugar.

              Bainimarama has repeatedly threatened to remove Qarase's government unless it drops three pieces of legislation, including a bill that would grant amnesty to those involved in a 2000 coup.

              Qarase has bowed to most of his demands, including suspending the three bills, but Bainimarama is still not satisfied.

              He accuses Qarase of having people associated with the 2000 coup in his government and high public offices.

              Bainimarama warns against resistance

              Comment


              • #8
                Armed Fiji soldiers moved into downtown Suva this morning and the military began seizing government ministers' vehicles, continuing what appears to be the first stages of a coup.

                Soldiers are manning checkpoints and guarding roads around government offices and other key facilities in the Fijian capital.

                At 6.30am about 20 soldiers in battle kit were positioned near roads bordering the old parliament complex, which houses offices of the Prime Minister and cabinet ministers.

                Military checkpoints have been set up nearby on other roads leading to the complex.

                Fiji commercial radio reported that soldiers earlier today removed two government vehicles used by ministers from the car park in the compound.

                Land forces commander Lieutenant-Colonel Pita Driti was quoted as telling the broadcaster all minister's vehicles would be seized, including that of Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase.

                Soldiers fanned out all over Suva and in the western city of Nadi from late yesterday, setting up checkpoints on roads leading to the centre of Suva and near vital assets.

                The military says the checkpoints are to ensure the public's safety because of a potential threat from dissident groups.

                There have been no reports from other sources of any resistance to the military.

                Qarase said he would meet President Ratu Josefa Iloilo this morning after soldiers turned away his vehicle from Government House late yesterday.

                The Prime Minister said the soldiers had wanted him to walk from the entrance gate along an uphill driveway about 400 metres long

                "I refused to do that, so I came back,'' Mr Qarase told the radio station.

                The Prime Minister yesterday flew back to Suva by helicopter from a function outside the capital after a military checkpoint was set up on the road back.

                Police bodyguards who drove Mr Qarase's vehicle handed over their weapons to soldiers at the checkpoint.

                Military commander Commodore Frank Bainimarama later said the bodyguards' weapons had been returned.

                Driti said Mr Qarase's flight home was unnecessary.

                "The PM does not deserve a bullet, let alone be apprehended,'' he told the Fiji Sun newspaper.

                "We only wanted to disarm his bodyguards as part of the clean-up campaign.''

                The campaign is Commodore Bainimarama's term for forcing the government to meet a list of military's demands.

                The Prime Minister has called an emergency cabinet meeting today to discuss Commodore Bainimarama's demands, which Mr Qarase says have changed.

                But the commander has said the Prime Minister's time is up and is demanding his resignation.

                Yesterday Commodore Bainimarama, after receiving a communication from Iloilo, cut short a press conference in which he had been expected to announce his intentions.

                Commodore Bainimarama instead briefly defended the army's seizure of police weapons yesterday and refused to take questions.

                One of Fiji's three daily newspapers was not published today after management evacuated its building yesterday on reports of a military threat against the company.

                The Daily Post is partly owned by the government and has taken a strong anti-military line in its editorials.

                Fiji troops ring PM's office

                Comment


                • #9
                  FIJI'S army began surrounding government offices this morning as sources in the military told The Australian that Commodore Bainimarama would be forced to act one way or another and install and interim government by tonight.

                  The military arrived at the home of Fiji's Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase this morning and tried to cut through the locked gates to gain entry, raising the prospect of an immediate coup declaration.

                  Surrounded by dozens of media and police the army tried to gain access to Mr Qarase's house but failed. They then took the keys to Mr Qarase's official cars and departed, before returning later in the morning and taking the prime minister's two four-wheel drive vehicles with them.

                  More troops were also being sent to take up position around the prime ministerial residence.

                  A short time earlier, Mr Qarase told ABC radio: "I think it's inevitable that they'll move in."

                  "They will certainly take me away to an island location close by," the prime minister said.

                  The military commander has been waiting for a declaration by President Josefa Iloilo of a state of emergency or no confidence in the government to allow him to create an interim government, but that declaration has not been forthcoming.

                  The military may be forced to act because their accounts have been frozen by the Department of Finance, The Australian has learned.

                  Armed Fiji soldiers moved into downtown Suva today and the military began seizing government ministers' vehicles, continuing what appears to be the first stages of a coup.

                  Soldiers are manning checkpoints and guarding roads around government offices and other key facilities in the Fijian capital.

                  At 6.30am about 20 soldiers in full battle armour were positioned near roads bordering the old parliament complex, which houses offices of the prime minister and cabinet ministers.

                  Military checkpoints have been set up nearby on other roads leading to the complex.

                  Fiji commercial radio reported that soldiers earlier today removed two government vehicles used by ministers from the car park in the compound.

                  Mr Qarase has been at home all morning, with his Cabinet ministers coming and going. A Cabinet meeting on the crisis was called. It is expected the Prime Minister will visit the President at some time later today.

                  Government figures have been told to pack their bags and await the arrival of military police.

                  Fiji Public Service Commission chairman Stuart Huggett told The Australian that his chief executive Anare Jale had been called by the military and warned he would be detained.

                  "They called him and said: 'Pack your bags you're going to be arrested'," Mr Huggett said.

                  Mr Huggett, a British-born Fijian citizen who runs a successful architecture firm said a soldier came to his house last night to confirm it was his residence.

                  A soldier was last week spotted videoing the home of an Australian diplomat, security at the homes of High Commission staff has been increased with guards put in place and most staff moving into empty accommodation near the High Commission itself.

                  Many of the staff's family have gone, along with non-essential staff, however the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade intends to keep the High Commission operating throughout any crisis as best it can.

                  Soldiers fanned out all over Suva and in the western city of Nadi from late yesterday, setting up checkpoints on roads leading to the centre of Suva and near vital assets.

                  The military says the checkpoints are to ensure the public's safety because of a potential threat from dissident groups.

                  There have been no reports from other sources of any resistance to the military.

                  Mr Qarase said he would meet President Ratu Josefa Iloilo this morning after soldiers turned away his vehicle from Government House late yesterday.

                  Fiji coup 'inevitable' as troops surround PM

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Prime Minister John Howard says he has turned down a request for military intervention from Fiji's Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase.

                    Mr Howard has confirmed a coup is under way in the Pacific nation, with the President joining military leader Frank Bainimarama in a move against the Government.

                    Mr Howard has condemned the action as a tragic setback for democracy in Fiji.

                    Australia will cut defence ties with Fiji if the Government is removed from power, but Mr Howard says that will not mean sending troops.

                    "We discussed this at some length at the national security committee of Cabinet a short while ago," he said.

                    "We took the view then and have remained steadfast in the view that it is not appropriate for military intervention.

                    "In reality, if military action were taken now we'd be, in effect, invading the country and we have absolutely no intention of doing that."

                    Foreign Minister Alexander Downer says if the Mr Qarase is removed from office, Australia will suspend defence cooperation and ban Fijians involved in the coup from entering Australia.

                    Commodore Bainimarama has repeatedly threatened to topple Mr Qarase's Government, which won a second five-year term in May, claiming it is corrupt.

                    Mr Qarase was left isolated in his Suva residence on Tuesday when troops surrounded his home.

                    Heavily armed troops set up roadblocks throughout Suva on Monday, including around Mr Qarase's office and other towns like Nadi, the tourism hub in the west of the main island of Viti Levu.

                    The military appeared on the verge of taking control in what would be the nation's fourth coup in two decades as it tightened its stranglehold on the Government and the country.

                    "Up to now the Government is working under my leadership, but for how long we don't know," Mr Qarase said.

                    Mr Qarase said Fiji's President had granted Commodore Bainimarama "the go-ahead" to take power, but vowed he would not resign.

                    He said the President's office had given him two options - agree to a list of nine demands issued by Commodore Bainimarama, or resign.

                    "I cannot do either of those," Mr Qarase said.

                    He said that while he had no means to resist a military coup, he would not step down, and accused Commodore Bainimarama of wanting to become a military dictator.

                    "We are totally unarmed. We can't give in to the commander's demands and I am not prepared to resign voluntarily or even by force," he said.

                    "I am still prime minister and I'm not resigning."

                    Howard refuses Fijian request for military intervention

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Reports are coming in from Fiji that the president has given the military the go-ahead to take over running the country.

                      Local media is reporting that Fijian President Ratu Josefa Iloilo has signed an order dissolving Parliament.

                      Armed soldiers in Fiji have entered the grounds of the Prime Minister's residence in Suva and seized ministerial cars. Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase was inside meeting several cabinet ministers.

                      Meanwhile, New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark has condemned Fiji's President for telling the country's military commander that he can remove the government.

                      Miss Clark says Fiji's constitution only allows the President to remove the Prime Minister if he has lost the confidence of Parliament.

                      She says that is clearly not the case.

                      Miss Clark is urging both the president and the head of the military, Commander Frank Bainimarama, to pull back from “the brink” immediately.

                      She says if they don't they will cause irreparable damage to Fiji's economy and people.

                      Fiji’s president dissolves parliament: Report

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Fiji PM reported to be under house arrest

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Fiji's armed forces have staged the country's fourth coup in 20 years after a long-running political crisis.

                          The bloodless seizure of power - ending weeks of tension between the military commander and the Prime Minister - was played out in a typically leisurely Melanesian fashion, and resulted in immediate international sanctions.

                          Commodore Frank Bainimarama said yesterday he had temporarily assumed the country's presidency and sacked Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase and his ministers, who he accused of bribery and corruption.

                          "We consider that Fiji has reached a crossroads and that the government and all those empowered to make decisions in our constitutional democracy are unable to make decisions to save our people from destruction," he told a press conference yesterday.

                          The Commodore claimed the government, which had won a second five-year term in May, was too lenient with those behind Fiji's last coup in 2000. He had first threatened to overthrow Mr Qarase in July last year.

                          The Prime Minister, who is under house arrest, has refused to resign. He had previously asked Australia and New Zealand to send troops to Fiji to prevent the coup but was refused.

                          The Commonwealth's secretary general, Don McKinnon, warned that Fiji faced suspension from the 53-nation organisation which champions democratic principles. The country was suspended in 1987 and 2000 following military interventions.

                          "The likelihood of Fiji to be suspended is very high," said Mr McKinnon, a New Zealander who convened a meeting of eight Commonwealth foreign ministers in London on Friday which is expected to take the decision to suspend Fiji. Britain immediately suspended bilateral and military assistance, although it has no troops in Fiji. The Foreign Secretary, Margaret Beckett, said the coup was, "a major setback to the process of democracy in Fiji".

                          The political crisis has alarmed countries in the region and Australia sent three warships to Fiji in case its nationals had to be evacuated. The unrest follows trouble in the nearby Solomon Islands.

                          New Zealand's Prime Minister, Helen Clarke, attacked the "arrogance" of Commodore Bainimarama, saying she could only conclude he was, "severely deluded". "He called on people not to break the law - the military commander has just ripped up Fiji's constitution and chucked it out the window," she said.

                          New Zealand, which hosted crisis talks between the two Fijians last week, joined Australia in suspending defence ties with Fiji and barred those involved with the coup from entering either country. A ban on sporting contacts is also possible in the future.

                          Heavily armed troops set up roadblocks throughout the capital Suva and in Nadi, the tourism hub in the west of the main island of Viti Levu.

                          Last night, the situation in Suva was described as calm but uncertain by Romanu Naceva, a former sergeant major in the Royal Artillery and head of the British Servicemen's Families Association.

                          "What has happened is regrettable, it's illegal but what can we do? The only support the commodore has had is within his own establishment," he said.

                          It was announced the interim prime minister would be a doctor, Jona Baravilala Senilagakali, who is not a member of the military and has no political experience.

                          Four military coups in 20 years

                          May 1987

                          Since gaining independence from Britain in 1970, Fiji is wracked by ethnic tension between the country's Fijian and Indo-Fijian ethnic groups. The army, led by Colonel Sitiveni Rabuka, topples the Indo-Fijian government of Prime Minister Timoci Bavadra in a bloodless coup.

                          September 1987

                          A second coup declares Fiji a republic and gives native Fijians a much larger share of power despite the Indo-Fijian population being marginally larger. Amid international outcry, Fiji is thrown out of the Commonwealth and thousands of Indo-Fijians flee.

                          May 2000

                          Although Fiji is readmitted into the Commonwealth in 1997, its membership is suspended after nationalist George Speight takes PM Mahenrda Chaudry, an ethnic Indian, hostage, sparking another coup. Speight is jailed for treason and Laisenia Qarase is made Prime Minister.

                          December 2006

                          Mr Qarase proposes an amnesty for the plotters of the 2000 coup - a move bitterly opposed by the military. Relations reach rock bottom as the Prime Minister tries to fire Fiji's military leader Frank Bainimarama who refuses to step down and launches the fourth military coup.

                          Fiji's military faces sanctions after seizing power from PM

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Fiji's military chief, Commodore Frank Bainimarama, has placed advertisements in the country's newspapers calling on people to apply to be part of his caretaker government.

                            The military chief who led the coup says he is calling on people who have the welfare of the nation at heart to apply for a position in his interim government.

                            Commodore Bainimarama says he has already been contacted by people who are interested in rebuilding Fiji.

                            "We have already received written applications from some and we are receiving a lot more phone calls from people offering their services to be part of the caretaker government," he said.

                            Commodore Bainimarama says he will also appoint a team of investigators to examine alleged corruption within Fiji's elected government.

                            Church statement

                            Meanwhile one of Fiji's christian churches has accused Commodore Bainimarama of being dictatorial, manipulative, threatening and intimidating the nation.

                            The Christian Mission Fellowship says it strongly opposes the overthrowing of the democratically elected government.

                            In a statement, the church says Commodore Bainimarama's coup is the manifestation of darkness and evil and it has appealed to the military chief to hand back power to the elected government.

                            The Christian Mission Fellowship says it believes the cycle of coup culture in Fiji must be broken because it is based on lies and deception.

                            Fiji coup leader looks to fill government positions

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Fiji's deposed Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase has called on public servants not to obey the instructions of the new military regime.

                              In a radio interview this morning, he said there is a good chance the military coup led by Commodore Frank Bainimarama will fail.

                              Mr Qarase sounded defiant, insisting that any instructions given by the military-backed government are illegal.

                              He has also encouraged people to take part in acts of passive resistance in order to protect democracy and the rule of law.

                              As far as he is concerned, he is still the Prime Minister and any public servants who obey the army will be breaking the law.

                              "If they follow the orders of the military, they would be acting under an illegal authority," he said.

                              "There is only one legal authority in the country at this point, and that is the democratically elected government which I lead."

                              Meanwhile the United Nations (UN) Security Council has called for the early reinstatement of Fiji's democratically elected government.

                              Members of the 15-member UN Security Council have said in a statement they hope "the democratically elected government (of Mr Qarase) will be reinstated as soon as possible".

                              The statement, read out by Qatar's UN Ambassador Nasser Abdulaziz al-Nasser, also urges restraint and "a peaceful solution in accordance with Fiji's constitution".

                              It says the Council welcomes and backs "efforts by the Pacific Islands Forum and other regional and international entities to resolve this situation in a peaceful and last manner".

                              Don't obey military regime, Qarase pleads

                              Comment

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