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  • #16

    Vendredi 5 Novembre 2010 -- Au moins 50 fidèles en pleine prière ont été tués vendredi par la bombe d'un kamikaze dans une mosquée du nord-ouest du Pakistan, selon un nouveau bilan des autorités locales.

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        • #19

          November 11, 2010 -- A giant truck bomb today ripped through a police building in Pakistan's largest city, killing at least 15 people. Television footage of the scene in Karachi showed devastation, with rescuers dragging bodies from the rubble and distressed women and children fleeing the site. Hospitals reported that more than 100 people had been injured and, with more victims thought to be trapped under the rubble, the death toll is expected to rise. Five armed men stormed the heavily fortified provincial headquarters of the Criminal Investigation Department (CID) before the truck bomb went off, the Sindh home minister, Zulfiqar Mirza, said. The blast, which happened close to several five-star hotels and the residence of the Sindh chief minister, was felt in suburbs several miles away. Witnesses said it left a crater up to 15ft (4.5 metres) deep. The CID is the section of the Pakistani police that investigates militancy, sectarian violence and organised crime. Reports suggested arrested militants from the Sunni sectarian group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi were being held in the building.

          The CID is also investigating a Taliban suicide attack on the largest Sufi shrine in Karachi last month, in which eight people died. Violence in Karachi has spiralled to its worst level for more than a decade this year due to a mixture of political killings, sectarian violence, ethnic tensions and militant attacks. According to one count, more people have died violently on the city's streets this year than in Taliban suicide attacks across the whole country. The Edhi foundation, a charity that runs a rescue service, said it had sent 112 ambulances to the scene of the blast. "A Muslim cannot do such things. Killing humanity is not the teaching of Islam," Abdul Sattar Edhi, the charity's head and one of Pakistan's most respected public figures, said. News of the attack triggered a wave of protest on social networking websites such as Twitter, on which several commentators expressed anger at U.S. calls for Pakistan to "do more" in the war against militancy, and on blogs. "No country or set of citizens have suffered more in this war than ours," Ahsan Butt wrote on the Five Rupees blog.

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