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Dominique Strauss-Kahn charged in connection with allegations of sexual assault

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    June 6, 2011 -- Now it's confirmed: the maid will be taking the stand against former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn. "She is going to come into this courthouse, sit down on the witness stand and tell the world what he did to her," the maid's lawyer said after court today, according to the Daily Mail. This morning DSK pleaded not guilty to sexually assaulting the 32-year-old maid at the Sofitel last month. Maids yelled "shame on you" at DSK and his wife as they entered and left the courthouse this morning.

    In addition to confirming that his client will take the stand, lawyer Kenneth Thompson also said, "all of Dominique Strauss-Khan's power, money and influence throughout the world will not change the truth of what he did to her in that hotel room." But two former DSK accusers, French journalist Tristane Banon and ex-IMF worker Piroska Nagy said they won't help the prosecution and won't testify in the trial, the Mail reported. Also, "representatives from the French consulate were also at court today – a sign of how gravely the French are taking the allegations."

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    HJune 6, 2011 -- Former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn has pleaded not guilty to the sexual assault of a maid in a New York hotel. The 62-year-old faces up to 25 years in prison if convicted of charges including attempted rape, sex abuse, a criminal sex act, unlawful imprisonment and forcible touching. The former favourite for the French presidency was booed by a crowd of onlookers as he arrived at court in New York arm-in-arm with his wife, French TV journalist Anne Sinclair. A group of hotel workers had gathered at the court in solidarity with the alleged victim, an African immigrant. Peter Ward, president of Local 6 of the New York Hotel Workers Union, said: "She's our sister and we support her." Strauss-Kahn entered a plea of not guilty and is due to return to New York Supreme Court for a hearing before Judge Michael Obus July 18. The father-of-four spent four days in New York's Rikers Island jail before he was released on $1 million bail and placed under house arrest. He is now living in a luxurious townhouse in Manhattan's TriBeCa district. A prosecutor has estimated that the security arrangements alone would cost $200,000 a month. Strauss-Kahn's lawyer has said that although his client has a net worth of roughly $2 million, his heiress wife is happy to bankroll him while he is on bail.

    The banker resigned as managing director of the International Monetary Fund a few days after he was arrested on May 14 in the first class section of an Air France plane that was about to leave New York for Paris. He was accused of attacking the maid, described as a 32-year-old single mother, hours earlier when she came to clean his suite at the luxury Sofitel hotel in Midtown Manhattan. Strauss-Kahn's lawyer Benjamin Brafman told reporters his defence is likely to be that any sexual contact with the woman was consensual, saying: "When the evidence is in, it will be clear there was no forcible compulsion." The maid's lawyer, Kenneth Thompson, said: "All of Dominique Strauss-Kahn's power, money and influence will not stop the truth of what he did to her in that hotel room from coming out. She is going to come into this courthouse, get into that witness stand and tell the world what he did to her." Before his arrest, Strauss-Kahn had been widely expected to stand for nomination as the Socialist Party's presidential candidate. He had been a strong favorite to beat Nicolas Sarkozy at the polls next year.

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    "Shame on you!"



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    June 6, 2011 -- Dominique Strauss Kahn, the former head of the International Monetary Fund, has pleaded not guilty to charges he raped a hotel maid. The one-time French presidential hopeful will face trial over the allegations that cost him his job and sent the IMF into crisis. He will be back in court on 18 July. At a brief hearing at Manhattan criminal court he pleaded not guilty in a strong voice, standing between his defence team and watched by his wife, the millionaire former journalist Anne Sinclair. Strauss-Kahn's lawyers said they needed six weeks to assess evidence that has been collected by the U.S. authorities. DNA matching Strauss-Kahn's has reportedly been found in semen on the maid's clothing and on a section of carpet from his hotel room. Experts say the defence will probably argue that any sexual contact between the maid and Strauss-Kahn was consensual.

    Strauss-Kahn was released on $6 million bail three weeks ago. He has been staying in a $50,000 a month townhouse in Tribeca, Manhattan. The former IMF boss is wearing a electronic tag that monitors his movements and must pay $200,000 a month for a private security team that is authorised to use force should he attempt to flee. He is under curfew between 10pm and 6am and allowed out only for court, doctors' visits and religious services. Prosecutors must be notified at least six hours before he goes anywhere. Under his terms of house arrest he can receive up to four visitors at a time besides family. Last month a moving company picked up 44 boxes of furniture, clothes, art and a rug from Strauss Kahn's $4 million Washington DC home and delivered them to the Tribeca townhouse. At the time of his 14 May arrest the 62-year-old economist had been considered a leading contender to run against the French president, Nicolas Sarkozy.

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    May 26, 2011 -- The lawyers for Dominique Strauss-Kahn have suggested that they possess information that would undermine the credibility of the hotel housekeeper who has accused their client of sexual assault. The suggestion was made in a letter sent by Mr. Strauss-Kahn’s lawyers to Cyrus R. Vance Jr., the Manhattan district attorney, that asked him to do whatever he could to stop law enforcement officials from leaking information in the case. In the letter, which was sent on Wednesday and added to the court record, Mr. Strauss-Kahn’s lawyers, William W. Taylor III and Benjamin Brafman, said they were concerned “that our client’s right to a fair trial is being compromised by the public disclosure of prejudicial material even before these materials have been disclosed to his counsel.” “Indeed, were we intent on improperly feeding the media frenzy, we could now release substantial information that in our view would seriously undermine the quality of this prosecution and also gravely undermine the credibility of the complainant in this case,” the lawyers wrote.

    While the stated purpose of the letter was to lodge a complaint about leaks to the news media, it also served as a form of legal gamesmanship — allowing Mr. Strauss-Kahn’s lawyers to hint at damaging information about the victim without revealing it. Indeed, Mr. Vance’s office responded with its own letter, noting that it was dismayed that Mr. Strauss-Kahn’s lawyers “chose to inject in the public record your claim that you possess information that might negatively impact the case and ‘gravely’ undermine the credibility of the victim.” The letter, which was signed by Joan Illuzzi-Orbon, the chief of the hate crimes unit, who was just appointed to the case, indicated that prosecutors knew of no such information. “If you really do possess the kind of information you suggest that you do, we trust you will forward it immediately to the district attorney’s office,” Ms. Illuzzi-Orbon wrote.

    Attacking the credibility of the housekeeper may be a critical part of Mr. Strauss-Kahn’s legal strategy. Although there have been leaks that there is DNA evidence tying Mr. Strauss-Kahn to a sex act, it would not indicate whether that act was forced or consensual — putting greater weight on the credibility of the woman and of Mr. Strauss-Kahn. Both sides have begun the process of accumulating background evidence on Mr. Strauss-Kahn and the housekeeper. Prosecutors, for example, have said they have been in contact with “more than one” woman who said that she had been sexually assaulted by Mr. Strauss-Kahn; at one court appearance, a prosecutor said, without elaboration, that Mr. Strauss-Kahn had “a propensity for impulsive criminal conduct.” The defense has hired investigators from the firm Guidepost Solutions to look into the woman’s background and examine any weaknesses in her account.

    Mr. Taylor and Mr. Brafman also appeared to be using the letter as a way to speed up the discovery process in which the prosecution is supposed to turn over evidence to the defense. In addition to asking Mr. Vance to do everything he can to stop the leaks, the lawyers asked that his office “promptly provide us with copies of all of the scientific reports that have been completed and have already been leaked to various media outlets.” The defense was referring to reports that Mr. Strauss-Kahn’s DNA was found on the uniform of the hotel housekeeper. The letter also asked the prosecution to turn over all police reports and formal statements made by the accuser because her statements already had been reported by the press. The letter said all of the leaked information was attributed to sources within the New York Police Department. But the defense lawyers said they wanted to bring the issue to Mr. Vance’s attention. The lawyers also cited what they characterized as a “wide array of prejudicial information about Mr. Strauss-Kahn, including information which even if true, would never be admissible in any court.”

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    May 26, 2011 (Reuters) -- The possibility of a payoff arises frequently in cases such as Dominique Strauss-Kahn's sexual-assault charge, where the defendant has power and wealth and the accuser has neither. It came up again after The New York Post reported on Tuesday that friends of the indicted former International Monetary Fund chief tried to pay off the alleged victim's family in exchange for recanting her claims that Strauss-Kahn tried to rape her and forced her to perform oral sex on him: What would happen to the prosecution's case if the Sofitel hotel maid decided to retract her allegations? On Wednesday Reuters reported that Strauss-Kahn's lawyers denied the report, and there is no evidence that a payoff attempt occurred. But the conjecture alone raises complex legal and ethical issues.

    Prosecutors confronted with a suddenly recalcitrant witness must contend with the requirements of the Confrontation Clause of the Sixth Amendment, which guarantees a defendant the right "to be confronted with the witnesses against him." Their paths around this mandate are limited and not particularly appealing, analysts say. First they could subpoena the witness, requiring her to testify and hoping she would decide to stick with her original story. But such a move could backfire if the witness backed the defendant's version of events. If the witness delivered a different account of events on the stand, prosecutors could impeach her credibility by pointing out that she told a different version to police or to the grand jury. The threat of perjury is also available if the witness previously testified under oath - as she did last week in front of the grand jury. Normally the hearsay rule prohibits prosecutors from introducing previous out-of-court statements, experts say. But there are exceptions, several of which could be applicable in the Strauss-Kahn case.

    According to authorities, the alleged victim immediately told hotel staff and police officers that she had been assaulted. These statements could be admissible under the "excited utterance" exception to the hearsay rule, which allows unsworn statements made spontaneously following a shocking event to be submitted as evidence of what occurred. "Most likely, there were a whole bunch of excited utterances - to hotel staff and to the first police officers that arrived," said Daniel Bibb, a former Manhattan prosecutor. "This kind of evidence is common." Another hearsay exception, known as "immediate outcry," and available only in sex-crime prosecutions, would permit prosecutors to submit certain out-of-court statements the alleged victim made following the incident, Bibb said. This exception is often used to bolster the credibility of alleged victims who do not report the crime to authorities right away. Prosecutors could also proceed without her testimony altogether, relying on the physical evidence collected at the scene, for instance. Going ahead even without a victim's testimony is done most frequently in domestic violence cases, which are often hamstrung by witnesses who eventually decline to testify to protect their partners. It's generally known as "evidence-based prosecution." But this would be an unlikely option for Strauss-Kahn's prosecutors. "You don't see that happening in many sex crimes cases," said Anne Milgram, the former attorney general of New Jersey, who doubts a case could be made against Strauss-Kahn without the alleged victim. "The prosecution needs the witness in this case." In many domestic violence cases, lawyers say, there is additional evidence of a crime: bruises, for example, or neighbors who heard fighting.

    If, however, the prosecution could prove that the alleged victim's sudden change of heart was due to a bribe or threat from Strauss-Kahn or someone associated with him, their options expand. In such a case, the woman's sworn testimony to the grand jury and her statements to police could be submitted as evidence, even though Strauss-Kahn's lawyers had no chance to cross-examine her, according to David Jaros, a former Brooklyn public defender. As long as the defendant has "dirtied his hands" by witness tampering, a judge could decide he has waived his Sixth Amendment right to confront his accuser, Jaros said. But proving such a charge against the defendant himself can be difficult. "They would have to show that the defendant was involved in tampering with the witness before they could access any kind of sworn statement that she had made," Jaros said. On the other hand, a bribe from a third party, not traceable to the defendant, would probably not be enough to erase his right to confront the witness. In such a case, prosecutors could only introduce grand jury testimony to impeach the alleged victim if she changed her account. They could not use it as evidence of what actually happened. Any bribe paid at Strauss-Kahn's behest would be illegal and subject him to additional charges. In theory, prosecutors could go after anyone who tried to bribe the alleged victim's family although arresting a foreign national - whether in France or Africa, where the maid's family lives - might prove difficult. "If people offer bribes to folks in Africa for the purpose of interfering with the testimony of a witness in New York, that conduct would be cognizable by the New York courts, and they might be criminally liable for it," said John Moscow of Baker Hostetler, a criminal defense lawyer in New York.

    The more likely way in which money might play a role in ending the case would be through a civil lawsuit filed by the alleged victim. In general, legal experts say, crime victims are better off waiting for the criminal case to be resolved before proceeding with a civil complaint, for a variety of reasons. But they occasionally proceed simultaneously. On Wednesday night, Reuters reported that the maid's lawyer, Jeffrey Shapiro, has added two attorneys to her legal team, in part to decide "whether there is a civil case going forward," he said. He noted that any civil suit would need to be filed within one year of the incident. When basketball star Kobe Bryant was charged with rape, his alleged victim filed a civil lawsuit shortly before the criminal case was dismissed, reportedly because she decided she didn't want to testify. The case eventually settled for an undisclosed sum. In another celebrity case, pop singer Michael Jackson paid millions in 1994 to settle a civil lawsuit brought by a boy who accused him of sexual assault, even as two grand juries were convening to consider charges. No charges were ever filed, in part because the accusing witness said he would not testify. If a civil suit has been filed, lawyers can work out a settlement at any time, though they must comply with ethics rules mandating that the criminal and civil cases remain separate. The suggestion that a witness's testimony in a criminal trial would be affected by a civil settlement could draw obstruction of justice charges and disbarment.

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  • Guest 123
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    NEW YORK, May 26, 2011 (Reuters) -- In the days since Dominique Strauss-Kahn's arrest for the attempted rape of a hotel maid, lurid details of the ex-IMF chief's past sexual exploits - both alleged and admitted - have continued to fill the tabloids. But legal experts say that prosecutors will face an uphill battle if they try to introduce any of the encounters as evidence in the criminal case against Strauss-Kahn. "What the courts want to avoid is showing that he's done it so many times that it's more likely that he did it this time, and to substitute that reasoning for evidence," said well-known defense lawyer Gerald Shargel, who has represented such clients as John Gotti Jr. and disbarred attorney Marc Dreier. Existing New York law is "tantamount to a presumption" that prior acts of sexual misconduct cannot be introduced at trial. But there is a limited set of exceptions under which such evidence can be used, for example to show there is something unique about the way a defendant conducted prior sexual activity, to rebut a defense of consensual sex, or to impeach a defendant's testimony. In contrast, the federal rules of evidence - which do not apply to New York courts, where Strauss-Kahn's case is being heard - permit prior sexual acts to be introduced in a sexual-assault case for any purpose.

    On May 15, Strauss-Kahn, 62, was pulled off an Air France plane by authorities after a maid at the Sofitel Hotel in midtown Manhattan said he had attempted to rape her and forced her to perform oral sex on him. Strauss-Kahn, who has vehemently maintained his innocence, stepped down from his post at the IMF last week. After spending several nights at Rikers Island jail, he was granted bail on May 19 on the condition that he be placed under the 24-hour watch of armed guards. He was indicted on seven counts, including attempted rape and first-degree criminal sexual act.

    Meanwhile, the media have painted a picture of Strauss-Kahn as a well-known womanizer who has been repeatedly excused for his past behavior on both sides of the Atlantic. In 2008, Strauss-Kahn admitted to a consensual affair with Piroska Nagy, an economist he worked with at the IMF. While the IMF reprimanded him in that instance, he was cleared of any abuse of power. In a letter to the IMF board, Nagy, who has since left the Fund, said she "got sucked in" by the "charismatic" ex-IMF chief's persistent advances. She characterized Strauss-Kahn as "a man with a problem that may make him ill-equipped to lead an institution where women work under his command." Law enforcement sources told Reuters they are reviewing the Nagy case.

    During Strauss-Kahn's arraignment last week, assistant district attorney John McConnell said that Strauss-Kahn had reportedly "engaged in conduct similar to the conduct alleged in this complaint on at least one other occasion." A source close to the investigation told Reuters that McConnell was referring to an alleged encounter with Tristan Banon, a journalist who has accused Strauss-Kahn of violently attacking her while she interviewed him in 2002. Banon is reportedly considering filing charges, but her lawyer told Reuters last week she would not testify to U.S. investigators. And on Tuesday, a law enforcement source told Reuters that the day before the alleged attack on the maid, Strauss-Kahn asked another Sofitel employee if she would meet him after she finished work. The employee reportedly declined, saying that it was against hotel policy and that she could lose her job. Even moments before his arrest, the New York Post reported, Strauss-Kahn made a sexually suggestive comment to an Air France flight attendant. Can prosecutors convince a judge to allow them to use any of this information in a possible trial against Strauss-Kahn? Legal experts suggest there is little doubt that they will try.

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    May 26, 2011 -- Lawyers for accused sex attacker Dominique Strauss-Kahn have sent a letter to Manhattan prosecutors demanding an end to leaks to the media. "Our concern is that our client's right to a fair trial is being compromised by the public disclosure of prejudicial material even before these materials have been disclosed to his counsel," Strauss-Kahn's big-name defense lawyers, Benjamin Brafman and William Taylor, wrote. The letter, released Thursday, was addressed to Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, but the lawyers noted: "We are not accusing you." They did claim police officials are leaking confidential information about the investigation into a hotel maid's allegations that the former International Monetary Fun chief tried to rape her. That includes DNA results that show the Frenchman's semen was on the accuser's shirt after the May 14 confrontation at the Sofitel in Times Square. The lawyers said that because of the leaks, prosecutors should "promptly provide" them with copies of scientific reports and the accuser's statements to authorities. Under rules of evidence, those reports are typically not handed over to the defense lawyers until the case has progressed further. Strauss-Kahn, 62, is under house arrest - in a $14 million Tribeca townhouse - after being indicted last week.

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    May 26, 2011 -- The alleged victim of Dominique Strauss-Kahn’s attempted rape and sexual attack hired additional legal counsel in anticipation of an assault on her reputation and credibility, her lawyer said. Attorney Norman Siegel, former director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, and former Assistant U.S. Attorney Kenneth P. Thompson, who prosecuted the New York City police officers for the beating and torture of Abner Louima, have begun to work on behalf of the 32-year-old hotel maid from Guinea, according to Jeffrey Shapiro, who has been representing her. “We anticipate the defense in this case is going to mount some sort of an assault on her,” Shapiro, a New York personal-injury lawyer, said today in a telephone interview. “It requires a team effort” to protect her, he said. Siegel and Thompson did not immediately return calls for comment. Shapiro said a civil suit had not been discussed at this point.

    The trio met yesterday, and another meeting is planned for tomorrow, Shapiro said. “In any case like this, they will try to discredit her in some manner, so she needs to be protected,” Shapiro said. The alleged victim is doing well, the lawyer added. “She’s very strong,” he said. “She’s with her daughter. She’s happy to be done with testifying to the grand jury. She’s going to be okay.” The woman has a 15-year-old daughter and, until the incident, they lived in the Bronx. “She has not been able to go back to work,” Shapiro said. “The hotel has continued to pay her, but that is not a long-term solution. That’s an interim solution.” He said no one else is providing her with support, and that her housing must be dealt with in the long term. Shapiro said he had no knowledge that anyone had approached the maid’s family in Guinea with offers of money to make the case go away, as the New York Post reported. William Taylor, a lawyer for Strauss-Kahn, said in a statement yesterday that reports of Strauss-Kahn’s attorneys’ or representatives’ being in contact with the woman or her family are false.

    Shapiro said he hasn’t spoken with his client about Strauss-Kahn’s being allowed out on bail. The former French finance minister was released from Rikers Island, New York’s main jail complex, on Friday after he met conditions imposed by a state judge. Among the terms are $1 million bail, a $5 million bond and security measures that include electronic monitoring and cost an estimated $200,000 a month. Strauss-Kahn was housed temporarily in Lower Manhattan after arrangements on the Upper East Side fell because of news media attention. He moved last night to Manhattan’s Tribeca neighborhood, near the courthouse where he is to go on trial. According to a sales listing for the 153 Franklin Street building on the StreetEasy real estate website, the property is a 6,804-square-foot townhouse. The four-bedroom unit, which was on the market for almost $14 million, includes a roof deck and garage, according to the listing.

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  • Guest 123
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    Bruno Béziat, Jeudi 26 Mai 2011 :


    Quelles sont les chances de DSK d'échapper à la prison ? De plus en plus minces, à ce stade de l'affaire. Dominique Strauss-Kahn est toujours présumé innocent. Mais il ressemble de moins en moins à la victime d'un coup monté. À moins que ses brillants avocats ne conservent dans leur manche une information fracassante ou une astuce juridique pour le disculper, la balance ne penche guère en faveur de l'ex-directeur du Fonds monétaire international. À ce stade de l'affaire, l'accusation semble avoir une longueur d'avance sur la défense. Même si quelques éléments vont encore dans le sens de Dominique Strauss-Kahn. État des lieux :

    1. Une version crédible

    Le récit de Nafissatou Diallo n'a pratiquement pas varié depuis le début de l'affaire. Et il est pour l'instant corroboré par des éléments matériels recueillis dans la suite du Sofitel et par des témoignages du personnel de l'établissement. La description qu'elle a faite de son agression est terrifiante pour Dominique Strauss-Kahn. Selon les éléments parus dans la presse américaine, vraisemblablement de source policière, il se serait précipité nu sur elle en lui touchant les seins, aurait déclaré à plusieurs reprises : «Tu sais qui je suis». Elle l'aurait supplié d'arrêter pour «ne pas perdre son travail». Dominique Strauss-Kahn l'aurait traînée dans la chambre après avoir fermé la porte, aurait tenté de la déshabiller, de la violer, l'aurait forcée par deux fois à pratiquer une fellation. Le personnel interrogé aurait retrouvé Nafissatou Diallo en pleurs, crachant sur le sol, prise de nausées.

    2. Des éléments à charge

    Toujours selon des éléments parus dans les médias américains proches des enquêteurs, l'ADN trouvé sur les habits de la victime présumée appartiendrait bien à Dominique Strauss-Kahn. Il proviendrait de son sperme. Les cartes magnétiques des portes n'ont apparemment pas contredit non plus le scénario de l'accusation. Le témoignage d'un garçon d'étage explique également pourquoi la femme de chambre guinéenne est entrée dans la suite, motif d'étonnement au départ de l'affaire. En outre, deux employées du Sofitel auraient témoigné d'avances très directes faites par DSK la veille des faits dénoncés par Nafissatou Diallo. Si tous ces éléments se confirment, même en partie, il va être difficile pour la défense de ne pas reconnaître qu'il s'est passé quelque chose dans la suite 2806. L'avocat a d'ailleurs déjà laissé entendre la possibilité de rapports consentis.

    3. La personnalité de la victime

    Mais le portrait de la victime présumée, tel qu'il commence à se dessiner, ne va pas l'y aider. Il est celui d'une jolie femme qui vit très modestement dans le Bronx, musulmane pratiquante, qui compte le moindre dollar, immigrée courageuse et débrouillarde dans un univers inconnu, une femme élevée en Guinée dans la crainte de l'autorité des hommes. Ce travail dans un hôtel chic était de toute évidence une chance pour Nafissatou Diallo. Difficile de supposer, dans ce contexte, que la jeune femme ait subitement accepté des rapports sexuels avec DSK en le voyant débouler nu dans la chambre, même contre de l'argent. Comme l'immense majorité des Américains, elle ne savait très certainement pas qui il était, pas plus qu'elle ne savait ce que représente le FMI. Simplement qu'il s'agissait d'une personnalité importante. On peut en revanche imaginer qu'elle est restée quelques instants tétanisée de peur, ne sachant probablement pas comment réagir à des avances plus ou moins agressives.

    4. Ce qui plaide pour DSK

    Que reste-t-il alors en faveur de l'innocence de DSK ? D'abord le mystère qui continue à entourer la victime. Même si son silence, comme celui de ses proches, peut se comprendre, la volonté de son avocat et de la communauté guinéenne de ne livrer que très peu d'informations laisse tout de même planer le doute sur un portrait parfois un peu trop idyllique. Autre aspect plutôt favorable à l'ex-patron du FMI : l'attitude de la police new-yorkaise. Comme plusieurs affaires l'ont déjà montré à New York, elle a parfois tendance à en rajouter dans le sens des victimes d'agression sexuelle. Il reste d'ailleurs dans les déclarations de Nafissatou Diallo un détail un peu surprenant, contradictoire avec l'accusation de tentative de viol. Elle a indiqué dans un premier temps que Dominique Strauss-Kahn avait tenté de la déshabiller, sans y parvenir apparemment. Mais cette incohérence pèse bien peu face à l'ampleur de l'accusation.

    Guinée : Des frères « choqués »

    «Nous sommes choqués et nous estimons que nous avons été touchés et souillés dans notre dignité», a déclaré à des médias français Mahmoud, le frère aîné de Nafissatou Diallo, qui demeure toujours à Tchiakoullé, le hameau d'origine de la famille, dans le nord de la Guinée. Un autre frère, Mamadou Dian, parle même d'humiliation. Il affirme que sa sœur a grandi avec lui et qu'ils vivaient ensemble à Conakry avant qu'elle ne parte «aux États-Unis en 2002». Selon lui, la jeune femme, veuve, a eu deux filles avec son mari, dont l'une «est décédée à l'âge de 2 ans». L'autre, adolescente, vit avec elle à New York. Selon lui, sa sœur, musulmane, «est une fille calme, pieuse, qui fait les cinq prières de la journée, quelle que soit son occupation. Elle parle peu, n'élève jamais la voix, demande toujours conseil avant de prendre une décision». Il dit ne vouloir qu'une seule chose : aller aux États-Unis «à côté» de sa sœur, mais n'en a pas «les moyens». Ces deux frères sont deux des six enfants (trois garçons, trois filles) nés d'un des mariages de leur père, prénommé Thierno Ibrahima, qui avait deux épouses. Le troisième frère est décédé.

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    Le Français Dominique Strauss-Kahn, ex-président du Fonds monétaire international, riche, puissant, célèbre, boursouflé d’arrogance et de vanité, est accusé d’avoir essaye de violer et d'avoir soumis, contre sa volonté, à des actes sexuels, une femme de chambre, une immigrée africaine musulmane sans histoires travaillant dur à New York. Parce que l’ambitieux Dominique Strauss-Kahn - autoproclamé futur président de la République française - se dit de gauche, parce qu’il était le favori du parti socialiste français à l’élection de 2012, une partie de la classe dirigeante française, sous le choc, s’est empressée de nier les faits, révélant ainsi son racisme, son sexisme, son islamophobie et son mépris total pour les plus humbles.

    Au nom de la présomption d’innocence, l’accusé est devenu victime et la victime présumée a été immédiatement désignée par les médiocres «élites», expertes en désinformation, qui occupent le terrain médiatique en France, comme coupable d’avoir participé à un prétendu «complot». Le viol est devenu un «troussage de domestique». Il a été minimisé parce qu’il n’y avait « pas mort d’homme ». On a plaint l’agresseur présumé pour sa «fragilité». Enfin, la mise en accusation du violeur présumé a même été présentée comme une «nouvelle affaire Dreyfus».

    Les témoins de moralité de Dominique Strauss-Kahn sont les mêmes que ceux qui apportaient naguère leur soutien aux racistes Georges Frèche et Pascal Sevran. Pourtant Dominique Strauss-Kahn, que ses amis présentent comme un «séducteur», n’a certainement jamais séduit que des proies faciles. Il est plutôt connu pour n’être qu’un obsédé sexuel notoire et avoir harcelé maintes et maintes femmes, y compris à Sarcelles, avec un certain goût pour la «diversité». Cette attitude misérable, qui rappelle plus volontiers Pervers Pépère que Don Juan, donne une image déplorable de la France, dont Strauss-Kahn ambitionnait d’être le représentant suprême.

    Pour exprimer ma condamnation du racisme, du sexisme et de l’islamophobie, pour montrer qu’au pays des droits de l’homme, il ne suffit pas d’être milliardaire et de se dire de gauche pour avoir toujours raison et être au-dessus des lois, pour protester contre l'impunité systématique dont bénéficient en France ceux qui s'en prennent à des Africains ou à des Afro-descendants, je rejoins le comité de soutien à Nafissatou Diallo, dite "Ophélia", victime présumée de Dominique Strauss-Kahn, accusé de tentative de viol, d'actes sexuels non consentis sur un tiers et de séquestration.

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    Jeudi 26 Mai 2011 -- La communauté noire de France déplore que la presse insiste autant sur la couleur de peau de Nafissatou Diallo, la jeune femme d'origine guinéenne qui accuse Dominique Strauss-Kahn de viol. "Inutile, outrancière, dégradante." Tels sont les commentaires de la communauté noire de France pour désigner la reprise systématique des médias français du qualificatif "noire" pour parler de Nafissatou Diallo dans l'affaire DSK.

    Alors que la couleur de peau de la jeune guinéenne est un élément d'information, sa mention même dérange. "Ca devient une habitude dans les médias, déplore Babacar, jeune français d'origine sénégalaise. L'opinion semble de moins en moins choquée par ce type de détail." Pour les "blacks" de France, la Guinéenne Nafissatou Diallo est dénigrée. "Il y a derrière une volonté de la décrédibiliser, estime Samira, parisienne originaire des Comores. Qu'elle soit noire ou blanche ne change rien à la problématique de l'affaire. Pas plus que de savoir son adresse ou sa religion. Un acte de violence est répréhensible en soi."

    Pour le président du Conseil Représentatif des Associations Noires (Cran), Patrick Lozès, "cette précision rend mal à l'aise. Dire qu'elle est noire entraîne un tas de stéréotypes qui font plus de mal qu'autre chose. En plus, il est mentionné que c'est une femme faisant des ménages dans un hôtel, vivant dans un immeuble pour séropositif, veuve, on entend même qu'elle est moche". Le Cran a envisagé un temps de publier un communiqué et attend maintenant la suite des évènements.

    Les noirs que nous avons interrogés prêtent aux médias diverses intentions, consciemment ou non. "On veut peut-être faire passer Nafissatou Diallo pour une allumeuse car certains voient les femmes noires comme plus libérées sexuellement", déplore Fanny, originaire de Martinique. "Cela peut être aussi une façon de contribuer à l'idée d'un complot avec l'idée qu'elle souhaitait profiter de la popularité de DSK pour se faire de l'argent", s'interroge Babacar. "Quoiqu'il en soit, toutes les supputations qui en découlent sont futiles et néfastes tant il s'agit de préjugés sans fondement". D'autres pensent simplement que cette précision joue en la défaveur de Strauss-Kahn, "l'agresseur blanc et la victime noire".

    Jean-Claude Bidoc, responsable d'antenne sur Tropiques FM, qui se définit comme la radio de l'outremer à Paris, confirme que "ce sujet est abordé au sein de la communauté noire. Néanmoins, ne jetons pas d'huile sur le feu, dit-il. Il ne faudrait pas que la victime présumée devienne un symbole communautariste. On ne peut pas dire que sa couleur de peau n'a pas d'importance et dans le même temps se liguer derrière elle sur le seul fait qu'elle soit noire".

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