Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Situation en Tunisie en Égypte et en Libye : Quelles conséquences pour l’Algérie ?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Comment



    • April 12, 2011 -- The Movement of Independent Youths for Change (MJIC), launched last month, aims to bring together youths of all walks of life to foster positive change in Algeria. Member Sofiane Baroudi is convinced that Algeria's young people need "to believe in the reality of their dreams" to build a prosperous and free country.

      Magharebia: How was your organisation created? What are its aims?

      Sofiane Baroudi: The MJIC was born out of the wave of protests that have occurred over the past few months. There has been an unprecedented level of agitation consisting of riots, marches and rallies. They spurred us to hold meetings with a view to creating a movement of young people, independently of any partisan group, that would seek to embody the aspirations of young people who have never had a voice. In a country that is in a more or less permanent state of turmoil with demonstrations punctuating social life, it seemed necessary to create a movement that can reflect, take action and build a future for us young people, conveying a different vision of society.

      Magharebia: Is your movement attracting Algerian youths? Do you feel that your ideals resonate with people's feelings? Do they believe in change?

      Baroudi: In fact, it seems that young people do share our ideas, because they are broadly-based, innovative, open to discussion and constantly developing. Our movement aims to carry out the will of the people and bring about convergence towards a shared ideal. The most difficult thing is to convey this idea to as many people as possible in order to expand the movement. Young people don't need to believe in change, they need to know that things can change, that the status quo can be turned around if we express our desire for a better tomorrow. We must work together to achieve this ideal, because we're all in the same situation. So we must unite, because we are all being held back by the same obstacles that are preventing us from moving forward. We must have faith in the strength and justice of our ideas.

      Magharebia: The internet seems to be playing a pivotal role in your efforts. Do you think what happened in Tunisia and Egypt is possible in Algeria?

      Baroudi: It's important to point out that the internet is less widely used in Algeria than in neighbouring countries. For instance, the number of Algerian Facebookers is only around 1.2 million out of a population of 35 million. The Internet is still almost a privilege in working-class areas. This means that it cannot be a foundation that a movement can rely on. However, it is a very important medium, especially for spreading ideas (blogs, mailing lists, Facebook groups and so on). In addition, let's not forget that the political and social context is different here. The Algerian population remains traumatised by the chaos caused by the struggle for freedom after October 1988. Our generation grew up in a state of emergency and despair that ensued from years of bloodshed. The curtailing of freedoms and the feeling of marginalisation by young people wore them down. That said, we have a lot in common with the Arab nations that have staged rebellions. In Algeria, all the ingredients for a social explosion are in place. What is happening in the Arab world transcends borders and forms part of a global movement. Nations are rejecting totalitarianism and injustice. They aspire to chart a new course and will no longer agree to row in the galleys without even being able to look at their horizons. The impetus is the same everywhere, but the conditions are different.

      Magharebia: Is "change" a young person's pipe dream or will it become a reality?

      Baroudi: Until now, we have been forbidden to dream. A wise person once said that you have to take your dreams for realities by believing in the reality of your dreams. I remain convinced that this dream will be the fuel for young people and all those who aspire to a better Algeria.

      Comment



      • ALGIERS, April 18, 2011 (UPI) -- Algeria, a major oil and gas producer, appears to have ridden out the political upheaval gripping the Arab world, largely because the government has bought time by pledging economic and political concessions. Indeed, amid the widening cracks in Algerian society, the most immediate threat appears to be a worsening power struggle between President Abdelaziz Bouteflika and the military and a possible spillover of violence from neighboring Libya. That threat was heightened in recent days. On Saturday, jihadists of the Algerian-led al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb killed 13 soldiers in an ambush in the northern Kabylie region, their deadliest strike in months. Two days later, the military said AQIM killed six security personnel in two attacks in the Boumerdes and Bouira regions east of Algiers. The media put the death toll at 20. Weapons shipments from Libya, where state armories have been plundered in the fighting there, were intercepted along the border March 29 and April 6. If Algeria does erupt, its energy exports could be disrupted, pushing up prices. The country has oil reserves of 12.1 billion barrels and gas reserves of 159.1 trillion cubic feet.

        On Friday, Bouteflika, who lifted a 19-year state of emergency February 24 in a bid to mollify protesters, announced a series of political reforms, including changes to the constitution and the electoral law to widen the role of political parties. He said the reforms would be adopted before national elections scheduled for May 2012. But his proposals got a frosty reception. The El Watan daily said they simply supported a system "which wants to keep things in hand while making it appear it is reforming - which it is not." Protests erupted in Algeria January 3 shortly after riots broke out in neighboring Tunisia, which resulted in President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali being driven from power January 14. A dozen Algerians set themselves on fire and others were killed by security forces in widespread riots over food prices and other social and economic grievances in a country where three-quarters of the population is under 30 and largely unemployed. But the wave of protests never became directed at bringing down Bouteflika's authoritarian regime, in the manner of the rulers of Tunisia and Egypt. Bouteflika contained the unrest by hiking food subsidies, offers of free land, doubling the salaries of state employees and ending the state of emergency. Also, the opposition's lack of cohesion was also a big factor in taking the sting out of the unrest. Protests remain localized and no organized national movement has yet coalesced. It is widely believed that Algerians are reluctant to engage in a nationwide uprising, like those in Tunisia and Egypt, because memories of the bloody civil war between Islamist militants and the government throughout the 1990s remain imprinted on the national psyche. Up to 200,000 people died in that conflict. The protests and strikes have increased in frequency over recent weeks but in general have been small-scale, underlining the lack a popular mobilization.

        The real rivalry for power in Algeria is between Bouteflika, 74, who was elected in April 1999 and is in his third five-year term, and General Mohammed "Tewfik" Mediene, head of the Directorate of Intelligence and Security, known as the DRS. Bouteflika's political "clan" is centered in the northwest around the city of Tlemcen. Mediene's power base is in the ethnic Berber majority. The two men have been at odds for years. But their rivalry heated up in December 2009 when Mediene launched a major counter-corruption campaign that was directly primarily at Bouteflika's political allies. Their power struggle has emphasized fissures within the ruling alliance led by the National Liberation Front and the National Rally for Democracy, which has backed Bouteflika. "If one or both of these parties were to leave the coalition, it would substantially weaken Bouteflika's position," the global security consultancy Stratfor observed in a Sunday analysis. "The Libyan conflict represents a substantial deterioration in Algeria's security situation and raises the threat of terrorism and weapons proliferation among non-state groups looking to profit from the decay of Libyan power in the region." Indeed, Stratfor added, the Algerian regime "fears AQIM could fill the vacuum created if Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was deposed."

        Comment


        • Merouane Mokdad :


          Lundi 25 Avril 2011 -- Mourad Medelci, le ministre des Affaires étrangères, en est convaincu : l’arrivée au pouvoir de l’opposition libyenne, en guerre depuis plus de deux mois contre le régime du colonel Kadhafi, est une hypothèse lointaine. «Nous en parlerons lorsque cela arrivera», a-t-il dit, sûr de lui, dans un entretien au quotidien Echourouk, publié ce lundi 25 avril. «L’Algérie soutient l’unité de la Libye. L’option de la division du pays existe dans certains agendas», a-t-il soutenu. Le départ de Kadhafi n’est pas selon lui une condition préalable ?* une solution pacifique ?* la crise. Autrement dit, le chef de la diplomatie algérienne est contre la position du Conseil national de transition (CNT, opposition) qui a conditionné toute solution politique au conflit par la fin du régime de Kadhafi. Continuant sur la lancée, Mourad Medelci a accusé le CNT de «polluer la vérité sur la Libye». «Il y a des parties qui alimentent la violence en Libye», a-t-il dit sans préciser l’identité de ces «parties». Selon lui, l’opposition cherche ?* amener l’Algérie ?* revenir sur ses positions diplomatiques concernant «la non ingérence» dans les affaires des autres pays.

          À une question sur les responsables de la situation en Libye, Mourad Medelci a eu une réponse curieuse : «La communauté internationale et l’Histoire enregistreront qui est responsable de cette renaissance terroriste». Ainsi, Alger, reprend presque mot pour mot, l’argumentaire du régime de Kadhafi pour discréditer les insurgés. Il les avait accusés d’être «?* la solde d’Al Qaida» sans aucune preuve. «Nous avons pris toutes les dispositions pour renforcer la sécurité ?* nos frontières et notre responsabilité diplomatique et politique est d’avertir les parties concernées pour faire de la lutte contre le terrorisme une préoccupation non seulement algérienne mais internationale», a déclaré Mourad Medelci. D’après lui, l’Algérie «respecte» la Résolution 1973 du Conseil de sécurité de l’ONU sur la Libye. «Nous disons que nous respectons cette résolution si ses objectifs sont humanitaires avec la protection des civils, mais la réalité sur le terrain a montré qu’il existe des visées non prévues par cette résolution», a-t-il dit, suggérant ainsi que l’Algérie n’est pas obligée d’appliquer la résolution onusienne. Selon lui, la position algérienne sur la Libye sera celle de l’Union africaine. «La médiation africaine est porteuse de solutions politiques», a-t-il argué.

          Revenant sur les révoltes arabes, il a estimé que le soulèvement en Tunisie était réellement populaire. «On ne peut pas dire qu’il existe un ordre donné de l’extérieur, mais pour ce qui s’est passé en Egypte, puis au Yémen et d’autres pays arabes, peut-on se dire que cette propagation est liée ?* 100% ?* la volonté de peuples ou est-elle ?* mettre sur le compte de calculs ou volontés internationales ? Seule l’Histoire pourra répondre ?* cette question», a-t-il souligné. À propos des relations de l'Algérie avec l’Egypte, le chef de la diplomatie a soutenu que la page de la crise née après le match de football qualificatif ?* la coupe du monde en 2009, a été tournée sur le plan officiel. «Mais sur le plan populaire, il y a toujours des sensibilités. Avec le temps, il faut œuvrer ?* réaliser la réconciliation totale», a-t-il dit. Il a indiqué que l’Algérie n’a présenté aucun candidat au poste de secrétaire général de la Ligue arabe et n’a pas fait de choix entre les deux prétendants en course (un Egyptien et un Qatari).

          Enfin, pour lui, les frontières ne doivent pas rester fermées éternellement entre l’Algérie et le Maroc. «Il faut ouvrir ces frontières, mais avant il faut créer les conditions nécessaires. Lorsque la décision sera prise, elle sera appliquée d’une manière honnête et équilibrée dans l’intérêt des deux parties. On peut y arriver en poursuivant les consultations entre les deux parties. Cela a été entamé, il y a trois mois et nous nous sommes entendus ?* continuer l’échange de visites dans des secteurs sensibles. Des visites qui vont continuer jusqu’?* la fin de l’année», a indiqué Mourad Medelci.

          Comment


          • Comment


            • Merouane Mokdad :


              Lundi 2 Mai 2011 -- «Non, il n’y a pas de printemps arabe. Ce concept est raciste. Comme si les peuples étaient l?* soumis ?* des régimes dictatoriaux et attendaient que quelque chose se passe. Ils sont comme tous les peuples. Il y a des similitudes entre des pays arabes et d’autres européens par rapport notamment ?* l’orientation économique», a déclaré ce lundi 2 mai, Louisa Hanoune, invitée de la Chaîne III de la radio nationale.

              La secrétaire générale du Parti des Travailleurs (PT) a qualifié de «vraie» la révolution en Tunisie. «Une révolution sociale qui a posé la nécessité de se débarrasser d’une dictature qui était soumise ?* l’Union européenne, au FMI et aux grandes puissances. Une révolution que nous soutenons». Mais, selon elle, «en Egypte, le processus a été contrarié par la prise du pouvoir par l’armée. Dans les autres pays, il y des soulèvements populaires. Il y a des aspirations ?* la liberté et ?* la démocratie. Et, en même temps, c’est un mélange avec des plans. Le plan du Grand Moyen Orient. Il n’y a pas de révolution en Libye. C’est une guerre civile réactionnaire», a-t-elle dit.

              Pour la Libye, elle a affirmé ne soutenir ni le Colonel El Kadhafi ni le Conseil national de transition (CNT, opposition). «Il ne peut pas y avoir une révolution sous l’égide d'une intervention multinationale. C’est un non sens. Le peuple libyen est sous les bombes de l’OTAN. On ne peut pas comparer la Tunisie, la Syrie, le Yémen ou la Libye. Il s’agit de situations différentes. Il y a un plan de partition de l’Africom», a-t-elle relevé. Selon Mme Hanoune, la Syrie, où le régime de Bachar Al Assad réprime les manifestations dans plusieurs villes, est en danger. «Il y a des manipulations», a-t-elle dit.

              Louisa Hanoune a estimé que la diplomatie algérienne a été lente ?* réagir après la révolution en Tunisie. «Nous sommes entièrement d’accord sur la position officielle de l’Algérie sur la situation en Libye. Une position contre l’ingérence», a-t-elle déclaré soulignant que les richesses libyennes seraient convoitées par le système capitaliste. «Les grandes puissances vendent les armes ?* toutes les parties en conflit. La crise du système capitaliste est féroce en ce moment, elles ont donc besoin de relancer l’industrie de l’armement», a-t-elle expliqué.

              L’intégrité territoriale de l’Algérie est, d’après elle, en danger avec les 900 km de frontières partagées avec la Libye. «Il y aussi des pressions qui s’exercent sur nous pour s’immiscer dans cette guerre. Tout le monde est en train de constater ?* quoi sert l’ONU, ?* qui sert cette chose, ce machin qui donne l’aval ?* toutes les guerres et qui est complètement dépassé. Cela nous fait rire de parler de la légalité internationale», a-t-elle ajouté.

              Selon elle, Oussama Ben Laden, dont l’annonce de la mort a été faite dimanche soir par le président américain Barack Obama, était un agent de la CIA. «Des responsables de la CIA l’ont annoncé sur des chaînes de télévision. Il y a une crise aux Etats-Unis liée ?* l’austérité budgétaire que veut imposer Obama. Il a donc besoin de faire diversion. La mort d’Oussama Ben Laden ? Bof ! Cette mort ne va influer sur rien. Al Qaida sera toujours l?*. Ils ont besoin de cette nébuleuse pour leur politique guerrière», a-t-elle noté. Selon elle, les grandes puissances provoquent des crises pour détourner l’attention.

              Comment


              • Riyad Hamadi :


                Jeudi 5 Mai 2011 -- En 1991, la victoire des islamistes du FIS lors des législatives en Algérie avait conduit ?* la démission du président Chadli Benjedid et ?* l’annulation du processus électoral par l’armée en janvier 1992. La Tunisie risque‑t‑elle de connaître le même scénario si les islamistes venaient ?* gagner les législatives du 24 juillet prochain ? Pour l'ex‑ministre de l'Intérieur du gouvernement tunisien de transition, Farhat Rajhi, la réponse est oui. Ce dernier a suscité jeudi un vif émoi dans son pays en dénonçant la préparation d'un «coup d'État militaire» dans le pays en cas de victoire des islamistes aux élections du 24 juillet. «Si le mouvement islamiste Ennahda gagne les prochaines élections, le régime sera militaire», a affirmé M. Rajhi dans une vidéo postée sur Facebook dans la nuit de mercredi ?* jeudi, dont il a confirmé la teneur jeudi sur la radio tunisienne Express FM. «Depuis l'indépendance (de la Tunisie), la vie politique est dominée par les gens du Sahel tunisien, et après le changement de situation – la chute de l'ex‑président Ben Ali le 14 janvier, ndlr – ces gens ne sont pas prêts ?* céder le pouvoir», a‑t‑il accusé.

                Alger informé ?

                Selon Farhat Rajhi, les Algériens auraient déj?* été informés des intentions du pouvoir de Tunis. «Le dernier voyage du Premier ministre tunisien Béji Caïd Essebsi ?* Alger (le 15 mars) a consisté ?* se coordonner sur ce point», a‑t‑il encore accusé. «La nomination, le 18 avril, du général Rachid Ammar au poste de chef d'état‑major inter‑armes (terre, air, mer) n'est qu'une préparation ?* ce coup d'État», a encore affirmé M. Rajhi. Lors de sa visite ?* Alger, M. Caïd Essebsi a eu un long entretien en tête ?* tête avec le président Bouteflika. Il est reparti avec une aide de 100 millions de dollars, l’une des plus importantes jamais accordées par Alger ?* un autre pays. Les deux hommes se connaissent de longue date, bien avant l’indépendance algérienne. En 1959, le président Bouteflika avait séjourné dans la maison de la famille de Caïd Essebsi. Les déclarations de M. Rajhi interviennent alors que les islamistes sont donnés largement favoris des prochaines élections. Le gouvernement transitoire tunisien a aussitôt condamné ces déclarations, soulignant qu'elles «portaient atteinte ?* l'ordre public», selon des propos rapportés par l’AFP. Plusieurs personnes ont manifesté jeudi dans l'avenue centrale Habib Bourguiba dans la capitale en faveur de M. Rajhi avant d'être dispersées, parfois violemment, par la police.

                Comment



                • Lundi 16 Mai 2011 -- L'Union européenne estime "crucial d'écouter les aspirations du peuple algérien" clairement exprimées depuis le début de l'année, a déclaré ce lundi 16 mai ?* Alger le Commissaire européen ?* l'Elargissement Stefan Füle. "Il est évidemment crucial de se mettre ?* l'écoute des aspirations du peuple algérien, aspirations qu'il a clairement exprimées depuis le début de l'année", a-t-il déclaré lors d'un point de presse concluant des discussions dans la matinée avec le chef de la diplomatie, Mourad Medelci. "L'Union européenne, a-t-il ajouté, salue l'annonce de la levée de l'Etat d'urgence et les réformes prochaines. Nous espérons qu'elles répondront aux aspirations du peuple algérien", a également ajouté le commissaire, arrivé dimanche soir pour une visite de deux jours en Algérie. M. Füle, dont c'est la seconde visite depuis juin 2010 en Algérie, a évoqué depuis les changements intervenus dans la région indiquant qu'avec ces révolutions l'UE était aussi en train de changer ses rapports avec ces pays du sud. Dans ce contexte de "révolutions historique dans cette partie du monde", a-t-il ajouté, l"'Union Européenne apporte son soutien total ?* l'Algérie et aux Algériens".

                  Comment


                  • Comment



                    • ALGIERS, May 17, 2011 -- A European Union commissioner said Monday it was crucial the Algerian government listened to the "aspirations of its people", as popular uprisings shake the region. EU Enlargement Commissioner Stefan Fule praised the Algerian government for lifting a state of emergency in February and pledging reforms. "It is indeed crucial to listen to the aspirations of the Algerian people, aspirations they have made clear since the beginning of this year," he told reporters after talks with Foreign Minister Mourad Medelci. "The EU welcomes the announcement regarding the pulling of the state of emergency and upcoming reforms. We hope they will respond to the aspirations of the Algerian people," he said, after arriving for a two-day visit. Fule said the EU was also adjusting its relations with countries shaken by uprisings that have swept the Arab world since protesters in Tunisia forced president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali to quit power in January. "There are historical changes in this part of the world," he said, stressing the EU's "full support toward Algeria and Algerians". Protests in Algeria intensified at the start of the year, with riots during demonstrations against the high cost of living leaving five dead and hundreds wounded. Since then scores of political and social movements have emerged across the country. The government lifted a 19-year-old state of emergency on February 24 and announced a series of political reforms that will be subject to consultations from May 21. They include a modification of the 1996 constitution and a revision of electoral law. The government has also increased public service salaries by up to 70 percent, with the rise backdated to January 2008.

                      Comment


                      • Comment


                        • Comment


                          • Sonia Lyes :


                            Vendredi 3 Juin 2011 -- Le président du RCD, Saïd Sadi, pense que le régime algérien, représenté «par le président de la République et le patron des services de renseignements» n’a aucune volonté de changement. «Bouteflika et Toufik sont absorbés par la sauvegarde du régime qu’ils en oublient la sauvegarde de l’espace national», a déclaré M. Sadi vendredi 3 juin ?* l’ouverture de la session du conseil national du parti. «Ils sont usés, divisés et ont peur, ce qui rend toute lisibilité politique impossible (….). Le pouvoir est totalement déconstruit, le système est incapable de générer une offre politique sur laquelle on peut se positionner», a‑t‑il ajouté.

                            Il rappelle que plusieurs partis, dont le sien, ont tenté de faire évoluer le régime de l’intérieur, mais sans succès. «Tous les partis ont tenté d’élargir des espaces dans le système, tous ont tiré la conclusion, y compris nous, qu’il est impossible d’amender les choses de l’intérieur». Preuve du souci du régime de se maintenir, selon lui, la somme d’argent dépensée depuis les événements de janvier qui seraient «une opération montée par le pouvoir», le vote de certaines lois, comme le code communal qui «vont dans le sens de la fermeture» et l’exclusion, par exemple, des syndicats lors de la récente tripartite. «Depuis janvier, le pouvoir a dépensé 30 milliards de dollars pour éteindre les foyers de tension alors qu’?* l’époque de Zeroual, l’Algérie roulait avec 9 milliards de dollars par an», a affirmé Sadi.

                            Mais cette démarche est porteuse de périls pour la Nation car le changement est inéluctable, estime‑t‑il. «Le retour de manivelle sera dévastateur (…) si on perd encore un peu plus de temps, la Nation va éclater (…) Il faut être naïf pour croire que ce mouvement de révoltes (arabes, ndlr) aussi massif allait s’arrêter ?* nos frontières», prévient‑il. Comme pour justifier l’absence «d’effet domino» sur l’Algérie, Sadi évoque deux raisons principales : des segments entiers de la société ont été «clientélisés» et la deuxième raison, c’est la nature de l’armée, «inculte et violente». «L’Algérie devrait être comparée ?* la Libye et ?* la Syrie et non pas ?* la Tunisie ou ?* l’Égypte», soutient‑il.

                            Face ?* cette conjoncture politique «déterminante», marquée par «un climat pré‑insurrectionnel», Sadi estime, «qu’il faut sortir du combat académique». «Il faut une mise ?* niveau des formes de lutte». Mais il n a pas détaillé ces formes. «Le changement ne viendra pas des élites, mais de la jeunesse», a‑t‑il conclu. Par ailleurs, il a estimé que «c’est la première fois que les puissances occidentales ont compris qu’il ne s’agit plus de composer avec les pouvoirs mais d’enregistrer les aspirations des peuples». «Le choix de l’ONU, de l’UE et du G8 de soutenir les révolutions des peuples, c’est pour éviter que la chute des despotes ne soient remplacée par des dictatures théocratiques», a‑t‑il dit.

                            Comment


                            • Comment

                              Unconfigured Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X